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The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories…
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The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Twentieth-Century… (original 1999; edition 1999)

by Howard Phillips Lovecraft (Author)

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2,715513,696 (4.01)96
Frequently imitated and widely influential, Howard Phillips Lovecraft reinvented the horror genre in the twentieth century, discarding ghosts and witches and envisioning instead mankind as a tiny outpost of dwindling sanity in a chaotic and malevolent universe. Love craft's preeminent interpreter S. T. Joshi presents a selection of the master's fiction, from the early tales of nightmares and madness such as "The Outsider" and "Rats in the Walls," through the grotesquely comic "Herbert West-Reanimator" and "The Hound," to the overpowering cosmic terror of "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" and "The Call of Cthulhu." The first paperback edition to include the definitive corrected texts, The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories reveals the development of Lovecraft's mesmerizing narrative style and establishes him as a canonical-and visionary-American writer.… (more)
Member:rayrile
Title:The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories (Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics)
Authors:Howard Phillips Lovecraft (Author)
Info:Penguin Classics (1999), Edition: unknown, 448 pages
Collections:Switzerland, Your library
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The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories by Howard Phillips Lovecraft (1999)

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English (50)  Swedish (1)  All languages (51)
Showing 1-5 of 50 (next | show all)
The Call of Cthulu is chilling still - the story builds gently but keeps a creepy eeriness throughout. Impressed by this little world that Lovecraft built. ( )
  ephemeral_future | Aug 20, 2020 |
I enjoyed this book, as a classic. As an inspiration for tons of D&D/RPG 'horror,' however, I just don't get it. ( )
  ca.bookwyrm | May 18, 2020 |
This is a good collection of Lovecraft but not, I feel, a great one, due to a certain amount of sameness and formula in many of the stories. From what I understand editor Joshi put together three collections for Penguin, so no doubt he had some kind of organization in mind for each, but I would have preferred something that was just more varied. This one focuses largely on Cthulhu mythos tales and while that is a great contribution to literature, the stories themselves are not really my favorites. As is usual in my experience with this author, the longer stories seem to drag on and on and on. (The only longer work by Lovecraft that I think is nearly perfect is "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward," not included here.) I regret selecting this particular volume for my book club, as I don't think it is as new reader friendly as another might have been, and in fact it was not a raging success. The most positive thing that was said from anyone reading him for the first time (which was almost everyone) was that it was interesting to read something from the roots of the genre. But I don't think any of them really liked it. Perhaps [b:The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories|564318|The Thing on the Doorstep and Other Weird Stories|H.P. Lovecraft|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1327885492l/564318._SY75_.jpg|551435] would have been a better choice. ( )
  chaosfox | May 1, 2020 |
Of course, I’ve heard of H P Lovecraft for years, but I’d never bothered to read anything by him. Just not my genre of choice. But I happened to have this in the house, courtesy of Penguin Random House (the publisher gifted me a set of their new “orange” Penguin Classics a few years ago), and it carries the “science fiction” tag so it fit a challenge.

First, these stories are mostly NOT science fiction, although one, dealing with aliens removing the brains of humans but keeping the bodies and brains both alive separately probably would qualify. Mostly this collection is one of horror stories originally published in magazines.

Second, as horror stories, I didn’t find them all that horrifying. Although, I can imagine that an audience in the early part of the 20th century would find them disturbing. The fact that Lovecraft writes all these stories in the first person serves to remove much of the suspense. Clearly the person survives any ordeal because he is telling the story. Reading them one after another in this collection made them seem formulaic and dull.

Lovecraft relied on the reader’s imagination in that he virtually never describes the “horror I witnessed,” instead relying on stating that said horror was just “too terrible for words.” There’s frequent use of the typical, dark, deserted location – either a room at the top of a tall tower, or a pit underground – into which the hero ascends (or descends), without any good light or backup, and despite the feeling of dread. In many of these cases, the hero awakens some time later with no memory of how he escaped.

Finally, although I recognize that this is a sign of the times in which they were written, Lovecraft relies on some disturbingly racist / prejudicial stereotypes.

On the plus side, one of his friends/colleagues was the inspiration for the hero of the final story in this collection: The Haunter Of the Dark. That person was Robert Bloch, who wrote Psycho. Lovecraft gave his character, Robert Blake, an address that was once Bloch’s home in Milwaukee. Sadly, one can no longer visit that edifice. It’s at a location that was cleared of houses in the ‘60s to make way for a freeway extension. But it was fun to see that address pop up in the book. ( )
  BookConcierge | Apr 23, 2020 |


“The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.”
( )
  iSatyajeet | Mar 29, 2020 |
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Howard Phillips Lovecraftprimary authorall editionscalculated
Joshi, S. T.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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I am writing this under an appreciable mental strain, since by tonight I shall be no more.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This work should include the Penguin edition along with other collections containing the following stories:

Dagon -- Statement of Randolph Carter -- Facts concerning the late Arthur Jermyn and his family -- Celephais -- Nyarlathotep -- Picture in the house -- Outsider -- Herbert West--Reanimator -- Hound -- Rats in the walls -- Festival -- He -- Cool air -- Call of Cthulhu -- Colour out of space -- Whisperer in darkness -- Shadow over Innsmouth -- Haunter of the dark

Please keep separate the individual short story as well as collections with differing contents.
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Frequently imitated and widely influential, Howard Phillips Lovecraft reinvented the horror genre in the twentieth century, discarding ghosts and witches and envisioning instead mankind as a tiny outpost of dwindling sanity in a chaotic and malevolent universe. Love craft's preeminent interpreter S. T. Joshi presents a selection of the master's fiction, from the early tales of nightmares and madness such as "The Outsider" and "Rats in the Walls," through the grotesquely comic "Herbert West-Reanimator" and "The Hound," to the overpowering cosmic terror of "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" and "The Call of Cthulhu." The first paperback edition to include the definitive corrected texts, The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories reveals the development of Lovecraft's mesmerizing narrative style and establishes him as a canonical-and visionary-American writer.

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Contains the following novellas and short stories.

Dagon
The Terrible Old Man
Facts Concerning the Late Arthur Jermyn and his Family
Nyarlathotep
The Picture in The House
Herbert West - Reanimator
The Rats in The Wall
The Call Of Cthulhu
The Case Of Charles Dexter Ward
The Colour Out Of Space
The Dunwich Horror
The Whisperer In Darkness
The Shadow Over Innsmouth
The Dreams In The Witch House
The Haunter Of The Dark
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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141187069, 0143106481

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