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Righteous: Dispatches from the Evangelical…
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Righteous: Dispatches from the Evangelical Youth Movement

by Lauren Sandler

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Showing 5 of 5
Parts of this book were disturbing. Parts were warm and fuzzy. And then, when I got to the chapter on Patrick Henry College, I was downright terrified. Even now, days later, I can't shake that creepy foreboding feeling. I suspect that the kind of person who would assume that this book wouldn't appeal to them, is exactly the kind of person who should read it. ( )
1 vote laurustina | Jan 14, 2015 |
A look at the growing youth evangelical movement and their goal to evangelize everyone. Mostly thoroughly researched, though the author does take a little too much at face value, reporting all witness stories as if they are true accounts without checking them out, nor even seemingly aware of the existence of numerous books of witness stories from which you can pick and choose if your story isn't dramatic enough. It is also somewhat dated; I read all about the extreme growth of Mars Hill Church and Mark Driscoll just as they are experiencing significant problems. In addition, the references to the youth movement as a grass roots movement seem to suggest that the author is unaware of all the literature detailing the deliberate nature by which this was propagated by the older generation...even though at times she mentions things that have been done to create that. Otherwise, a good primer about an important event in our century, the attempt to force the US to adopt a status as Christian nation and require that all citizens proclaim themselves as born-again Christians. ( )
1 vote Devil_llama | Sep 13, 2014 |
this was a really great book, although disturbing at the same time. It was an in-depth look into the fundamentalist/evangelical subculture in america. None of it really surprised me as it's what I great up with. but it was still interesting to see it all laid out in one place like this. what frustrates me the most, though, is that people make fun of the culture instead of taking it seriously and seeing what can be done to provide other avenues for youth who are feeling disenfranchised with america. ( )
  shannonkearns | Jan 8, 2011 |
I have an intense curiosity about what it is like to be a young person in the United States and stuck in a mega-church environment. If a young person goes to a traditionally sized church of 50 or 100 or 200 people, I still wonder what it would be like to live in an urban area where you could also find a church to go to with 1000 or 5000 people in it. I wonder what it is really like to go to a church where there may even be a food court, and the traditional kitchen basement where the church ladies make the food might be starting to be phased out. Can anybody in this society save the people and the institutions and the families from wrack and ruin? I guess time will tell. My historical view of churches in North America is of mild and meek people who do not want to get to mixed up with politics; but this can certainly no longer be the case. And it was probably a misconception to begin with. It is a fascinating historical case study to read about, and nothing like it has ever been seen in history before. I guess there could be some similarities to other times before--there is nothing new under the sun--but still the whole situation with end-of-empire and violence without end is truly staggering in its magnitude.
  libraryhermit | Apr 24, 2010 |
Sandler takes us into the world of the rising young evangelical youth movement. She travels across the country to find young people who are skateboarding, rapping, and protesting in the name of God. What I find most intersting about the book is that Sandler is a Jewish woman going into a distinctly Christian world.

We see young men and women in the military who are prepared to fight 'Armageddon', we see a skateboarding 'ministers' who put on shows for local communities while preaching the Christian Gospel, and we hear about the pattern of conversion, the mega-churches, and the political movements that are but an undercurrent today.

The picture that Sandler paints is one that is prophetic, if I may use such a phrase. Young men and women who are intent upon moving the country further right than it ever has been. I'm not sure how much of this picture is accurate, but I did find some information that was troubling.

No matter which side of the political spectrum you find yourself, this is a good book to pick up and learn something about this 'underground' culture. ( )
  jacklondon617 | Aug 13, 2007 |
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Why does this generation seek a sign?
Assuredly, I say to you, no sign will be given to this generation
--Mark 8:12
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To my parents, for everything
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Heather Erickson was an aggressively normal high school student -- pretty but not stunning, smart but not brilliant, flirtatious but not promsicuous -- a blond drum major with a head for business from a nice middle-class Virginia family.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670037915, Hardcover)

There's a new youth movement afoot in this country. It's a counterculture fusion of politics and pop, and it's taking over a high school near you. Like the waves that came before it, it's got passion, music, and anti-authority posturing, but more than anything else, this one has God. So what does it mean when today's youth counterculture has a mindset more akin to Jerry Falwell's than Abbie Hoffman's?

In RIGHTEOUS: Dispatches from the Evangelical Youth Movement, Lauren Sandler, a dynamic young journalist, reports from this junction of Evangelicalism and youth culture, traveling across the country to investigate the alternative Christian explosion. Using the grassroots modus operandi of the 1960s, these religious kids - part of the "Disciple Generation" as Sandler calls it - turn an antiauthoritarian sneer toward liberalism, feminism, pacifism, and every other hallmark of that era's counterculture. And they're engaging their peers with startling success, fusing pop culture, politics, and religion as they preach from the pulpit of the skate park, bar, and rock concert. Secular, liberal, and practically the embodiment of everything Evangelicalism deems unholy, Sandler travels with skateboard missionaries, hangs out with the tattooed members of a postpunk Seattle megachurch that has evolved into a self-sufficient community, camps out with a rock'n'roll antiabortion group, and gets to know the rap preachers who are merging hip-hop's love of money with old-fashioned bible-beating fundamentalism. Much more than a mere observer, she connects with these young people on an intimate level, and the candor with which they reveal themselves to her is truly astonishing.

Illuminating, often troubling, and unapologetically frank, RIGHTEOUS introduces a bold new voice into the ongoing debate over religion in American life. And it is the first in-depth front-line exploration of the country's new moral majority - dressed up in punk-rock garb - and what its influence could mean for the future of America.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:42 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"In this book, Lauren Sandler reports from the junction of Evangelicalism and youth culture, traveling across the country to investigate the alternative Christian explosion. Secular, liberal, and practically the embodiment of everything Evangelicalism deems unholy, Sandler travels with skateboard missionaries, hangs out with the tattooed members of a postpunk Seattle mega-church that has evolved into a self-sufficient community, camps out with a rock 'n' roll antiabortion group, and gets to know the rap preachers who are merging hip-hop's love of money with old-fashioned Bible-beating fundamentalism. Much more than a mere observer, she connects with these young people on an intimate level, and the candor with which they reveal themselves to her is truly astonishing. This is the first in-depth front-line exploration of the country's new moral majority - dressed up in punk-rock garb - and what its influence could mean for the future of America."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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