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Manden i den store fæstning by Philip…
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Manden i den store fæstning (original 1962; edition 1973)

by Philip K. Dick

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
12,112316425 (3.68)2 / 478
Now an Amazon Original seriesWinner of the Hugo Award"The single most resonant and carefully imagined book of Dick's career"--New York TimesIt's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some twenty years earlier the United States lost a war--and is now occupied by Nazi Germany and Japan.This harrowing, Hugo Award-winning novel is the work that established Philip K. Dick as an innovator in science fiction while breaking the barrier between science fiction and the serious novel of ideas. In it Dick offers a haunting vision of history as a nightmare from which it may just be possible to wake.… (more)
Member:mskarbiniks
Title:Manden i den store fæstning
Authors:Philip K. Dick
Info:Stig Vendelkær, 1973.
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick (1962)

  1. 81
    Fatherland by Robert Harris (ecleirs24)
    ecleirs24: Alternate history
  2. 61
    The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon (AlanPoulter)
    AlanPoulter: Both are alternate histories set in a USA changed by World War Two.
  3. 62
    The Plot Against America by Philip Roth (ateolf)
  4. 20
    Bring the Jubilee by Ward Moore (ecleirs24)
    ecleirs24: Alt history
  5. 10
    Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick (Anonymous user)
  6. 10
    The Castle of Crossed Destinies by Italo Calvino (ed.pendragon)
    ed.pendragon: Two very different approaches to using an oracle, one the Tarot, another the I Ching, to help structure a book's narrative.
  7. 10
    Farthing by Jo Walton (rretzler)
  8. 54
    The Years of Rice and Salt by Kim Stanley Robinson (ecleirs24)
    ecleirs24: Alternate history
  9. 00
    Divine Invasions: A Life of Philip K. Dick by Lawrence Sutin (Anonymous user)
  10. 00
    The Lost Continent by Edgar Rice Burroughs (Sylak)
    Sylak: Alternate history following WWI
  11. 00
    Resurrection Day by Brendan DuBois (RG_331)
    RG_331: What would happen if the Cold War escalated
  12. 00
    SS-GB by Len Deighton (Michael.Rimmer)
    Michael.Rimmer: Alternate History: Axis powers won WWII
  13. 01
    The Iron Dream by Norman Spinrad (andyl)
    andyl: Alternate history novel that also uses the book within a book device.
  14. 12
    China Mountain Zhang by Maureen F. McHugh (ahstrick)
  15. 01
    The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Disturbing Alternate Histories of America.
1960s (114)
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» See also 478 mentions

English (300)  French (4)  Italian (4)  Spanish (3)  Slovak (1)  German (1)  Hungarian (1)  Dutch (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (316)
Showing 1-5 of 300 (next | show all)
Este libro es un viaje de LSD de los que el bueno de Dick se pegaba. No sé cómo será la traducción, aunque me escama un poco por alguna ligera inexactitud que he leído por ahí, pero en su idioma original es como una película de Lynch, especialmente las partes de los pensamientos interiores de Tagomi, que están desarrollados como si fuese un nativo norteamericano discutiendo con el general Custer.

Por lo demás, es una utopía distópica bastante maja donde se cambia el final de la 2ª Guerra Mundial y alemanes y japoneses se reparten el mundo y tienen sus problemas políticos propios entre ellos con sus diferentes filosofías vitales. Lo que echo en falta con mi visión de finales del siglo XX es (y siempre negaré haber dicho esto aunque quede escrito) un poco más de frikismo; por ejemplo, la condición de Hitler solo se menciona pero no se desarrolla, y hubiera tenido bastante gracia aunque hubiese pecado de evidente.

También es verdad que la narración resulta un poco dispersa y el final has de deducirlo porque queda implícito en un arranque de originalidad (cough cough), pero temo que son marcas propias de la casa y Vds. han de aprender a vivir con ellas. ( )
  tecniferio | May 12, 2022 |
A really interesting concept. The text itself can be dry, but I believe that lends to the effect of the premise. That is, if the Axis powers had won WWII, humans would still be humans no matter who was in charge. ( )
  Theriq | Apr 20, 2022 |
This is an alternative history novel with an interesting premise: What if Germany and Japan won WWII? In this alternate history, Germany and Japan each rule half the globe. U. S. A. was broken down in half -- the east ruled by Germany, the west ruled by Japan. I had a lot of fun reading about Japan and Japanese people become the dominant culture and race in California, while white Americans become colonized, second class citizens. Wow! And at the end of the novel, things progressed to a point that Germany and Japan may fight each other out to see who's the boss of the world, using atomic bombs. Pretty epic!

Despite all the potentials for thrilling plot development, the story was NOT thrilling or action-packed, and it was delivered in a serious, contemplative tone. The author's first and foremost focus was on oracles garnered from Chinese classic I Ching. Multiple characters in the story revere and consult the oracles for every little thing they do. And the oracle always gives correct advice and insight. The ending of the book seem to preset the oracle as some all-knowing entity/deity with knowledge beyond this world. The author's second utmost focus seems to be on how the multiple characters are powerless to change things that they see as wrong or evil (a.k.a. the way the Nazis rule) even though they tried, because the system is too big for one individual to fight against. I think this is a feeling that readers can connect with, even when we are in the real world and not that alternative world.

The only qualm I have with this book is Japanese culture and people are portrayed extremely positively. The Japanese believe in peace and compassion, they have good taste in art, they are chic and elegant, they are horrified at the way Nazi persecuted people of non-Aryan race......etc. It's almost as if Nazis are the bad guys and Japanese are the good guys. Which was not what I understood to be true to history, based on what I read about Japanese government and soldiers in WWII. But then again, this is "alternative" history, so perhaps anything goes.

( )
  CathyChou | Mar 11, 2022 |
Infinitely unsatisfying. The TV show, with all its quirks and hangups, was better.

I can't believe they managed to make such a moving & fascinating show from such a dull & disappointing book. ( )
  chuff | Feb 28, 2022 |
This is one of those books where a rating isn't enough to explain how I felt about it. It's not that it's a bad book, it's just that even trying to willfully disregard the 60's era racism it left me feeling icky.

Now, don't get me wrong. In an alternate history book where the Nazis won WWII it would be shocking if there wasn't any mention of racism. It's just that Philip K. Dick never really makes any point about that racism, he just has his characters act and talk completely racist and therefore makes them very unlikeable. None of the characters were well-rounded, even the two Jewish characters who were really underutilized and one-dimensional.

I did like how the one female character went from being a whiny damsel in distress to taking agency in a dramatic way, even if she did have to lose her mind and act like a lost little girl to do it.

And I really liked Tagomi's inner monologue, how he described his emotional and physical state all the time. There was some really nice language in this book and, as you'd expect with PKD, some interesting philosophical discussions.

I have a really hard time with Philip K. Dick because I really really want to like his work but what I've read of him so far has left me pretty cold. He clearly had a brilliant mind and I enjoy experiencing his weird view of the world, but his characters are always too underdeveloped and cartoonishly bigoted that I just can't. I can excuse a lot based on PKD being a product of his time but not everything. The lack of empathy and emotional connection he had with his non-white and female characters always comes through even when he's trying to be "woke".

But I'll keep reading a few more of his "classics" just in case I'm missing something. ( )
  ElspethW | Feb 26, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 300 (next | show all)
Dick is entertaining us about reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation.... We have our own homegrown Borges.
added by GYKM | editNew Republic, Ursula K. LeGuin
 
Philip K. Dick's best books always describe a future that is both entirely recognizable and utterly unimaginable.
added by GYKM | editThe New York Times Book Review
 
Philip K. Dick... has chosen to handle... material too nutty to accept, too admonitory to forget, too haunting to abandon.
added by GYKM | editWashington Post
 

» Add other authors (25 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Dick, Philip K.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Weiner, TomNarratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brown, EricIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gambino, FredCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Glasserman, DebbieDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gleeson, TonyCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guidall, GeorgeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moore, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nati, MaurizioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
North, HeidiCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stöbe, NorbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Weiner, TomNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To my wife, Anne, without whose silence
this book would never have been written
To my wife Tessa and my son Christopher,
with great and awful love
First words
For a week Mr. R. Childan had been anxiously watching the mail.
Quotations
They know a million tricks, those novelists...Appeals to the base lusts that hide in everyone no matter how respectable on the surface. Yes, the novelist knows humanity how worthless they are, ruled by their testicles, swayed by cowardice, selling out every cause because of their greed...all he's got to do is thump on the drum, and there's the response. And he laughing of course, behind his hand at the effect he gets. (p. 128)
At six-fifteen in the evening she finished the book. I wonder if Joe got to the end of it? she wondered. There's so much more in it than he understood. What is it Abendsen wanted to say? Nothing about his make-believe world. Am I the only one who knows? I'll bet I am; nobody else really understands Grasshopper but me - they just imagine they do.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Now an Amazon Original seriesWinner of the Hugo Award"The single most resonant and carefully imagined book of Dick's career"--New York TimesIt's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some twenty years earlier the United States lost a war--and is now occupied by Nazi Germany and Japan.This harrowing, Hugo Award-winning novel is the work that established Philip K. Dick as an innovator in science fiction while breaking the barrier between science fiction and the serious novel of ideas. In it Dick offers a haunting vision of history as a nightmare from which it may just be possible to wake.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary
Alternate history
given alternate history;
what's true? What isn't?
(ed.pendragon)
Complex novel in
scope and ideas but flawed in
its execution.
(passion4reading)

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Average: (3.68)
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1.5 21
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3.5 216
4 1073
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