Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Prince (Rethinking the Western…

The Prince (Rethinking the Western Tradition) (original 1532; edition 1997)

by Niccolò Machiavelli (Author), Angelo M. Codevilla (Editor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,551142,363 (3.75)3
Title:The Prince (Rethinking the Western Tradition)
Authors:Niccolò Machiavelli (Author)
Other authors:Angelo M. Codevilla (Editor)
Info:Yale University Press (1997), Edition: New edition, 192 pages
Collections:Your library

Work details

The prince : with selections from the discourses by Niccolò Machiavelli (1532)



Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

English (11)  Italian (1)  All (12)
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
  OberlinSWAP | Aug 1, 2015 |
A must read for an one developing ethics. ( )
  geniemagik | Dec 5, 2013 |
The Prince is a staple in politics and political reading. While Machiavelli and his principals aren't the best, they're still in use today, showing the timelessness of The Prince. ( )
  06nwingert | Feb 27, 2010 |
Six out of ten. Typically described as a guidebook for politicians, it's insight into people and groups does make some of the lessons quite applicable to everyday life, for example dealing with workmates or family or to help understand exactly what the PM's latest communication was meant to achieve. Honestly, however, the chapters on keeping mercenaries loyal is of little benefit to anyone. ( )
  theboylatham | Jan 25, 2010 |
Here is the world's most famous master plan for seizing and holding power.
2 vote HanoarHatzioni | Jun 10, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Niccolò Machiavelliprimary authorall editionscalculated
Donne, DanielTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Donno, DanielEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
First words
To the Magnificent Lorenzo Di Piero De' Medici:

Those who strive to obtain the good graces of a prince are
accustomed to come before him with such things as they hold most
precious, or in which they see him take most delight; whence one
often sees horses, arms, cloth of gold, precious stones, and
similar ornaments presented to princes, worthy of their greatness.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English


Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0553212788, Mass Market Paperback)

When Lorenzo de' Medici seized control of the Florentine Republic in 1512, he summarily fired the Secretary to the Second Chancery of the Signoria and set in motion a fundamental change in the way we think about politics. The person who held the aforementioned office with the tongue-twisting title was none other than Niccolò Machiavelli, who, suddenly finding himself out of a job after 14 years of patriotic service, followed the career trajectory of many modern politicians into punditry. Unable to become an on-air political analyst for a television network, he only wrote a book. But what a book The Prince is. Its essential contribution to modern political thought lies in Machiavelli's assertion of the then revolutionary idea that theological and moral imperatives have no place in the political arena. "It must be understood," Machiavelli avers, "that a prince ... cannot observe all of those virtues for which men are reputed good, because it is often necessary to act against mercy, against faith, against humanity, against frankness, against religion, in order to preserve the state." With just a little imagination, readers can discern parallels between a 16th-century principality and a 20th-century presidency. --Tim Hogan

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 25 Oct 2015 11:55:08 -0400)

Contents: The prince -- Discourses upon the first ten books of Titus Lily -- Chronology -- Notes to The Prince -- Notes to the discourses.

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Popular covers


Average: (3.75)
1 8
1.5 1
2 22
2.5 4
3 99
3.5 24
4 127
4.5 13
5 86

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.


About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 124,064,061 books! | Top bar: Always visible