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Year of Yes: How to Dance It Out, Stand In the Sun and Be Your Own Person

by Shonda Rhimes

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8876020,722 (3.97)6
With three hit shows on television and three children at home, Shonda Rhimes had lots of good reasons to say NO when an unexpected invitation arrived. Hollywood party? No. Speaking engagement? No. Media appearances? No. And there was the side-benefit of saying No for an introvert like Shonda: nothing new to fear. Then Shonda's sister laid down a challenge: just for one year, try to say YES to the unexpected invitations that come your way. Shonda reluctantly agreed, and the result was nothing short of transformative. In Year of Yes, Shonda Rhimes chronicles the powerful impact saying yes had on every aspect of her life -- and how we can all change our lives with one little word: Yes.… (more)
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    Kiddboyblue: These are both inspiring reads that deal with overcoming obstacles like depression and anxiety.
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» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
This was a great book. Shonda is so open and honest (even though she says she’s a liar!) The book resonated with me way more than I expected it to. If you are looking for a pick me up or a personal development book that’s not corny, this is the book for you! ( )
  thewestwing | Aug 12, 2022 |
Cute Memoir
Cute, semi-inspirational, but very repetitive memoir from the creator of ABC’s Thursday night lineup. In case you’re not familiar, Shonda Rhimes is the powerhouse behind some of my favorite shows: Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal, How to Get Away with Murder, and Bridgerton (the first season only, not fond of season two). Regardless, Shonda Rhimes writes her life's stories in the same dramatic frothiness as her tv shows. Overall, it’s cute and inspiring, but grows tedious with fluffy mantras. ( )
  krraye | Jul 27, 2022 |
I really enjoyed this book. I love how open she is about her lack of self confidence and love in herself at the beginning. Watching her journey to true self discovery was awesome. She learned to accept herself for who she is and is not. It is something we all should do. I know that I have been on that journey myself for the past few years and it can be a struggle. Some of the reviewers were saying how she repeats herself but that didn't bother me at all. Neither did it bother me that she seemed to have it all and still wasn't happy in her life. There are many people like that. I like the honesty that she WASN'T happy in life, wasn't living life even though she had it all. It makes it easier for those of us that have major day to day struggles to see that we all have our demons and our battles to fight. I agree with her and plan on continuing to grow and love myself daily. ( )
  KyleneJones | Apr 25, 2022 |
I found most of her lessons hard to relate to. The majority of the book was a list of her accomplishments and how she chose to attend events celebrating those accomplishments. Though I appreciate the effort she made by sharing her inner life and her efforts to improve it, she has made a dichotomy of introvert and extrovert where introvert is inherently bad and must be subverted. There are unhealthy ways to live for both introverts and extroverts who go too far in one direction. It also feels unfair to say that things turned out well for her saying "yes" to everything when everything she said yes to was inherently positive: talk shows, commencement speeches, weight loss, more family time. Everything seemed to turn out great just by saying "yes" but there has to be a lot more to it than that. The book starts with a great premise of making positive change, but the examples she gives are so specific to her life situation that it doesn't feel applicable to someone else. She is at the height of her career with three healthy children, supportive family, and stable finances. This way of life does not in itself take away her ability to be relatable, as can seen by how well another well known female public figure, Melinda Gates, speaks about empowering women in "The Moment of Lift." Gates excellently executes the premise of Year of Yes. Gates gives anecdotes from her life and how choices affected both her and the people around her (for good and for bad) and speaks about the general principles of empowerment. She was both humble and confident in her abilities. I did not get that same impression from Rhimes' "Year of Yes." Her discussion doesn't include how her "yes" affected people outside of herself and her "ride or die" friendships. I would have liked to see more of that and if others in her life had started to say yes too. And if they had, were they successful? Or was this just a lucky fluke? ( )
  jlford3 | Apr 19, 2022 |
I enjoyed this a lot more than I thought I would and found some valuable insights in it. I'd definitely recommend the audio version, read by the author. It includes recorded speeches she's given (that she discusses in the book) which are definitely better than just reading the text. Yes, there were parts of her life that are totally un-relatable. But the incredibly introverted, shy, nerdy, writer was pretty close to home. It almost made me want to start watching her shows again (I gave up on Scandal in season 4 and Grey's Anatomy in season 6). She's funny, creative, wise, and you can't argue with her success. ( )
  NanetteLS | Feb 11, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 58 (next | show all)
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With three hit shows on television and three children at home, Shonda Rhimes had lots of good reasons to say NO when an unexpected invitation arrived. Hollywood party? No. Speaking engagement? No. Media appearances? No. And there was the side-benefit of saying No for an introvert like Shonda: nothing new to fear. Then Shonda's sister laid down a challenge: just for one year, try to say YES to the unexpected invitations that come your way. Shonda reluctantly agreed, and the result was nothing short of transformative. In Year of Yes, Shonda Rhimes chronicles the powerful impact saying yes had on every aspect of her life -- and how we can all change our lives with one little word: Yes.

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