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Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in…
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Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software (original 2003; edition 2003)

by Eric Evans (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
7241026,954 (4.24)1
"Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing. "His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain; it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique. "The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers--it is a future classic." --Ralph Johnson, author of Design Patterns   "If you don''t think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you''ve forgotten to do. "Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it. This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion." --Dave Collins, author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces   "Eric weaves real-world experience modeling--and building--business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric''s descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field." --Luke Hohmann, author of Beyond Software Architecture   "This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer." --Kent Beck   "What Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We''ve given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we''ve never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important." --Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java(tm) Programming with IBM® WebSphere®   The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process.   Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development.   Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic. A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team. A shift in emphasis--refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code--in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Driven Design then builds on this foundation, and addresses modeling and design for complex systems and larger organizations.Specific topics covered include: Getting all team members to speak the same language Connecting model and implementation more deeply Sharpening key distinctions in a model Managing the lifecycle of a domain object Writing domain code that is safe to combine in elaborate ways Making complex code obvious and predictable Formulating a domain vision statement Distilling the core of a complex domain Digging out implicit concepts needed in the model Applying analysis patterns Relating design patterns to the model Maintaining model integrity in a large system Dealing with coexisting models on the same project Organizing systems with large-scale structures Recognizing and responding to modeling breakthroughs With this book in hand, object-oriented developers, system analysts, and designers will have the guidance they need to organize and focus their work, create rich and useful domain models, and leverage those models into quality, long-lasting software implementations.… (more)
Member:Hexacorp
Title:Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software
Authors:Eric Evans (Author)
Info:Addison-Wesley Professional (2003), Edition: 1, 560 pages
Collections:Your library
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Domain-Driven Design: Tackling Complexity in the Heart of Software by Eric Evans (Author) (2003)

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Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
There is a lot of things to learn in here. Probably I should read it again. ( )
  NachoSeco | Oct 10, 2022 |
See elsewhere for my more detailed summary.

The short summary is that Domain-Driven Design is a great book for any programmer or software designer who wants to deepen their ability to model application domains. Evans describes why domain modelling is important and sets out a number of patterns for achieving better models. He has a good grasp of real world complexities and, because of that, insists that a model must be implementable if it is to be successful. Any overlap between the model and the implementation should be identical or the model will become obsolete.

Evans provides a number of patterns to help determine the best domain model for an application. These patterns range from the abstract to the concrete, from the brilliant to the pedantic. Overall, I highly enjoyed the book although, at just over 500 pages, I am glad that I had a reading group to work through it with.
( )
  eri_kars | Jul 10, 2022 |
For some reason this book is greatly beloved in programming circles. I can't tell if that's because the people doing the beloving are die-hard Java Enterprise programmers, or if I'm just missing something here. But I think it's the former.

Domain-Driven Design is an excessively dry, boring book whose main thesis seems to be "make sure everybody agrees on what terminology is being used." What could have been this one sentence is instead 650 pages, chocked full of UML diagrams and insipid discussions about shipping containers. And that's saying something, coming from a guy who reads excessively dry boring math and engineering books on the regular.

If I had to be charitable, I would say that this book is independently groping towards functional programming without knowing it, and trying to shoehorn the ideas into an OOP-mindset. There is a lot of potential here for things to like, but it ultimately falls short. If you've only ever coded in Java, or frequently sketch UML diagrams, this might be the book for you. And if so, may god have mercy on your soul. ( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
This work was published in 2004 – a lifetime ago for the field of software design. It tackles issues relevant in 2004 but are standard practice today. Its basic message – learn not just the software but also the domain – is an important one, but most of the insights has been absorbed into computer-programming praxis over the last fifteen years.

Its strength is in delineating how the programmer is to relate to the domain experts who teach the programmer about the application area. He defines the term “ubiquitous language” to describe the language and concepts the two must share. I like this concept, but I think that the chosen wording should be “common language” instead of referring to the concept of ubiquity (whose meaning is closer to everywhere than shared or common).

This book had its time and place. However, for the $50 price current on the market, I suggest that its time and place has passed. It has contributed to history, and one should appreciate those effects. Nonetheless, contemporary design concepts – like Agile development or the DevOps movement – certainly deserve more attention from the reader.

( )
  scottjpearson | Jan 25, 2020 |
This is a great book for domain modeling. It should be required reading for programmers. Little things like using consistent language does make a big difference. ( )
  pgSundling | Apr 30, 2019 |
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"Eric Evans has written a fantastic book on how you can make the design of your software match your mental model of the problem domain you are addressing. "His book is very compatible with XP. It is not about drawing pictures of a domain; it is about how you think of it, the language you use to talk about it, and how you organize your software to reflect your improving understanding of it. Eric thinks that learning about your problem domain is as likely to happen at the end of your project as at the beginning, and so refactoring is a big part of his technique. "The book is a fun read. Eric has lots of interesting stories, and he has a way with words. I see this book as essential reading for software developers--it is a future classic." --Ralph Johnson, author of Design Patterns   "If you don''t think you are getting value from your investment in object-oriented programming, this book will tell you what you''ve forgotten to do. "Eric Evans convincingly argues for the importance of domain modeling as the central focus of development and provides a solid framework and set of techniques for accomplishing it. This is timeless wisdom, and will hold up long after the methodologies du jour have gone out of fashion." --Dave Collins, author of Designing Object-Oriented User Interfaces   "Eric weaves real-world experience modeling--and building--business applications into a practical, useful book. Written from the perspective of a trusted practitioner, Eric''s descriptions of ubiquitous language, the benefits of sharing models with users, object life-cycle management, logical and physical application structuring, and the process and results of deep refactoring are major contributions to our field." --Luke Hohmann, author of Beyond Software Architecture   "This book belongs on the shelf of every thoughtful software developer." --Kent Beck   "What Eric has managed to capture is a part of the design process that experienced object designers have always used, but that we have been singularly unsuccessful as a group in conveying to the rest of the industry. We''ve given away bits and pieces of this knowledge...but we''ve never organized and systematized the principles of building domain logic. This book is important." --Kyle Brown, author of Enterprise Java(tm) Programming with IBM® WebSphere®   The software development community widely acknowledges that domain modeling is central to software design. Through domain models, software developers are able to express rich functionality and translate it into a software implementation that truly serves the needs of its users. But despite its obvious importance, there are few practical resources that explain how to incorporate effective domain modeling into the software development process.   Domain-Driven Design fills that need. This is not a book about specific technologies. It offers readers a systematic approach to domain-driven design, presenting an extensive set of design best practices, experience-based techniques, and fundamental principles that facilitate the development of software projects facing complex domains. Intertwining design and development practice, this book incorporates numerous examples based on actual projects to illustrate the application of domain-driven design to real-world software development.   Readers learn how to use a domain model to make a complex development effort more focused and dynamic. A core of best practices and standard patterns provides a common language for the development team. A shift in emphasis--refactoring not just the code but the model underlying the code--in combination with the frequent iterations of Agile development leads to deeper insight into domains and enhanced communication between domain expert and programmer. Domain-Driven Design then builds on this foundation, and addresses modeling and design for complex systems and larger organizations.Specific topics covered include: Getting all team members to speak the same language Connecting model and implementation more deeply Sharpening key distinctions in a model Managing the lifecycle of a domain object Writing domain code that is safe to combine in elaborate ways Making complex code obvious and predictable Formulating a domain vision statement Distilling the core of a complex domain Digging out implicit concepts needed in the model Applying analysis patterns Relating design patterns to the model Maintaining model integrity in a large system Dealing with coexisting models on the same project Organizing systems with large-scale structures Recognizing and responding to modeling breakthroughs With this book in hand, object-oriented developers, system analysts, and designers will have the guidance they need to organize and focus their work, create rich and useful domain models, and leverage those models into quality, long-lasting software implementations.

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