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Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story…
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Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway’s Masterpiece… (original 2016; edition 2016)

by Lesley M. M. Blume (Author)

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2088103,394 (3.54)16
"The making of Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, the outsize personalities who inspired it, and the vast changes it wrought on the literary world. In the summer of 1925, Earnest Hemingway and a clique of raucous companions traveled to Pamplona, Spain, for the town's infamous running of the bulls. Then, over the next six weeks, he channeled that trip's maelstrom of drunken brawls, sexual rivalry, midnight betrayals, and midday hangovers into his groundbreaking novel The Sun Also Rises. This revolutionary work redefined modern literature as much as it did his peers, who would forever after be called the Lost Generation. But the full story of Hemingway's legendary rise has remained untold until now. Lesley Blume resurrects the explosive, restless landscape of 1920s Paris and Spain and reveals how Hemingway helped create his own legend. He made himself into a death-courting, bull-fighting aficionado; a hard-drinking, short-fused literary genius; and an expatriate bon vivant. Blume's vivid account reveals the inner circle of the Lost Generation as we have never seen it before, and shows how it still influences what we read and how we think about youth, sex, love, and excess."--… (more)
Member:KateFinney
Title:Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway’s Masterpiece The Sun Also Rises
Authors:Lesley M. M. Blume (Author)
Info:Eamon Dolan/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2016), Edition: 1st, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:purchased-not-read

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Everybody Behaves Badly: The True Story Behind Hemingway's Masterpiece The Sun Also Rises by Lesley M. M. Blume (2016)

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Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
My favorite novels are Huckleberry Finn (which Hemingway called "the great American novel"), On the Road, Generation X and The Sun Also Rises. They are all road trip stories about people who are out of step with the larger population. Hemingway's other two great novels, A Farewell to Arms and For Whom the Bell Tolls, are much longer and for me a comedown from The Sun Also Rises, not nearly as good.

It was great to learn about the backgrounds of the real people whose characters filled the pages of this great novel. This is all quite apart though from the fact that Hemingway was a reprehensible person who got worse as he got older. ( )
  JoeHamilton | Jul 21, 2020 |
Hemingway's life provides fodder for many writers, but M M Blume misses the boat with very little new information on Hemingway. I prodded along in this dull, senseless book hoping to reach the end before I died of boredom. I thoroughly enjoyed the pictures, but the book did little to maintain my attention. ( )
  delphimo | Mar 31, 2018 |
I'm not a big Hemingway fan, although I found this book to be interesting given what a huge personality and reputation the man had/has. I'm thinking I need to go back and read more of his work. ( )
  flourgirl49 | Jan 24, 2017 |
It's the 1920's and Ernest Hemingway has started to cause a stir among the literati who hang our in the salons and cafes on Paris' Left Bank. His stories are getting notice, but what he really needs s a big, juicy novel.

Then he goes to Pamplona for the Feria in July with a group of people who include, his wife, his soon-to-be lover,an over-sexed, alcoholic English aristocrat soon to be divorced from her titled husband, her literary boyfriend who mistakenly thinks he's Hemingway's friend, a charismatic bull fighter and several other assorted people. Throw all these people into a alcohol fueled weekend where the bulls ran in the streets and everyone made sexual advances to everyone else and, well, doesn't this book just write itself?

I don't think much new ground is covered in this book. However, if you find the Lost Generation endlessly fascinating, this is a fun read. ( )
  etxgardener | Jan 6, 2017 |
I have been reading nonstop Hemingway this month. This being the third book of nonfiction. Another facet of his overpowering personality and persona. As with the description of the paper doll cut outs in Vanity Fair Hem was a different person to whoever was characterizing him. This book portrayed him as preditory. Bitter before warrented, mean and unloyal. Self-centered and slightly narcissistic. A user and notoriously ingrateful.

I like my Hem slightly less sinister. The truth of the matter is that he craved to be recognized as an important writer who tore the written word down to bare bones. He had a great gift of recall and used the events of July 1925 and the people involved as the basis for The Sun Also Rises. He was a genius who used people up then discarded them.

And in the words of Harold Loeb, aka Robert Cohn, that's the way it was.

Lesley M.M. Blume was hard on the Bever. ( )
  Alphawoman | Aug 30, 2016 |
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"The making of Ernest Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, the outsize personalities who inspired it, and the vast changes it wrought on the literary world. In the summer of 1925, Earnest Hemingway and a clique of raucous companions traveled to Pamplona, Spain, for the town's infamous running of the bulls. Then, over the next six weeks, he channeled that trip's maelstrom of drunken brawls, sexual rivalry, midnight betrayals, and midday hangovers into his groundbreaking novel The Sun Also Rises. This revolutionary work redefined modern literature as much as it did his peers, who would forever after be called the Lost Generation. But the full story of Hemingway's legendary rise has remained untold until now. Lesley Blume resurrects the explosive, restless landscape of 1920s Paris and Spain and reveals how Hemingway helped create his own legend. He made himself into a death-courting, bull-fighting aficionado; a hard-drinking, short-fused literary genius; and an expatriate bon vivant. Blume's vivid account reveals the inner circle of the Lost Generation as we have never seen it before, and shows how it still influences what we read and how we think about youth, sex, love, and excess."--

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