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I'm Thinking of Ending Things: A Novel…
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I'm Thinking of Ending Things: A Novel (Packing may vary ) (original 2016; edition 2020)

by Iain Reid (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,1028113,671 (3.26)42
You will be scared. But you won't know why... I'm thinking of ending things. Once this thought arrives, it stays. It's always there. Always. Jake and I have a real connection, a rare and intense attachment. What has it been...a month? I'm very attracted to him. Even though he isn't striking, not really. I'm going to meet his parents for the first time, at the same time as I'm thinking of ending things. Jake once said, "Sometimes a thought is closer to truth, to reality, than an action. You can say anything, you can do anything, but you can't fake a thought." And here's what I'm thinking: I don't want to be here. I'm thinking of ending things. Iain Reid explores the depths of the human psyche, questioning consciousness, free will, the value of relationships, fear, and the limitations of solitude. Reminiscent of José Saramago's early work, Michel Faber's cult classic Under the Skin, and Lionel Shriver's We Need to Talk About Kevin, this tense and atmospheric novel will haunt you long after the last page is turned.… (more)
Member:Heri_Potter
Title:I'm Thinking of Ending Things: A Novel (Packing may vary )
Authors:Iain Reid (Author)
Info:Gallery/Scout Press (2020), Edition: Media Tie-In, 256 pages
Collections:Your library, Favorites
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I'm Thinking of Ending Things by Iain Reid (2016)

  1. 00
    Foe by Iain Reid (sturlington)
    sturlington: Really interesting writer
  2. 00
    Security: A Novel by Gina Wohlsdorf (sturlington)
    sturlington: Both books are a little gimmicky, but I think it works.
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» See also 42 mentions

English (79)  German (1)  All languages (80)
Showing 1-5 of 79 (next | show all)
I didn’t mean to read this book in one sitting but I accidentally did, and had I finished it earlier in the evening I’d have immediately started to reread it.

The dust jacket boasts “you will be scared and you won’t know why” and that really is the most spot-on description. From the opening scene I was on edge and I flew through the final quarter of the book possibly *too* quickly.

I wish I could say more without spoiling, but I can’t, so just read it. But after I return it to the Library because I am 1000% reading it again. ( )
  SamBortle | Jul 23, 2021 |
That was one weird novel. A new couple is traveling to the farm of the boyfriend to meet his family. The conversation in the car is interspersed with the girl's memories - of meeting Jake, of how the relationship progressed and of a mysterious caller who she prefers not to talk about - and intentions - because she is considering ending the relationship, despite traveling to meet the family. Things get even weirder in the farm and then on the road back.

And throughout the whole story, something just does not add up. While the different actions seem to be logically ordered, something is just off and in places laughably unrealistic. I almost gave up on the novel a few times - it was getting progressively weird and not in a good way. What kept me reading were the short interludes between the parts of the novel - a secondary story about a dead person, written exclusively in dialog, which seemed to be unrelated. But of course, it could not be so unrelated so I wanted to know where and how these stories will meet. Reid did a wonderful work with the stories merging - making the reader see things that may or may not be there.

By the end of the novel, all of those weird impossible moments in the main story are explained - using the secondary story to make you realize what is going on first and then catching up in the main story. It was a gimmicky novel in a way that probably will work for some but I felt it too clever - it felt like the writer was more concerned with the puzzle and being clever than with the story. Not my cup of tea. ( )
  AnnieMod | Jul 21, 2021 |
Couldn't bring myself to read any further. It appears to have a meaningful plot but, God, it sure is a dreadfully boring read. I tried my best but I just can't move ahead.
Skipped to the plot twist and not even that's worth putting up with this slow book ¯_(ツ)_/¯ ( )
  AngustiaCosmica | Jul 11, 2021 |
So, I made it to page 18. My usual rule is to make myself read to page 50 before Abandoning a book, but I'm not getting any younger, and I could feel my life-force ebbing away, line by tedious, pretentious, completely unrealistic line. Having checked out a few reviews, I now discover that, in the last couple of pages, the patient reader will discover that there is a REASON why the previous 200 pages are tedious, pretentious and completely unrealistic, and that it's all totally worth waiting for. Glad to know that.

( )
  maura853 | Jul 11, 2021 |
(32) Hunh? Strange novel. A girl goes with her new boyfriend, Jake, to meet his parents for the first time. She is actually thinking about breaking up with him during this visit to the family's farmhouse as well as mulling over some unusual things that have been happening to her lately. A caller speaking in a scratchy fake female voice has been calling her phone and leaving her monotonous creepy messages. But the weirdest thing is that the caller rings up as her own number. . . So yeah, everything is not as it seems.

The story devolves and gets darker and stranger. There also are segments written in italics which seem to be between two people discussing what must be the suicide of a man they both knew who had a mental breakdown and ended things. Whoa. Wait. Who is the one that is mentally ill? The girlfriend with the caller? Jake, the boyfriend? Oh now we have more info - it is Jake's brother. Right?

Cleverly written. A bit gimmicky. Seems written for almost a YA audience with the high school; the relationship obsession; the parents. But a creepy portrait of mental illness and pending suicide. I can see why it is a bit of a sensation. I was alone in the house at night when I read the bulk of it and I was completely creeped out.

Anyway - recommended for those who like YA lit and psychological thrillers. In the end it was a bit too gimmicky for a much higher rating but I am glad I read it. What are you waiting for? No really, what are you waiting for? ( )
  jhowell | Jun 5, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 79 (next | show all)
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I'm thinking of ending things.
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You will be scared. But you won't know why... I'm thinking of ending things. Once this thought arrives, it stays. It's always there. Always. Jake and I have a real connection, a rare and intense attachment. What has it been...a month? I'm very attracted to him. Even though he isn't striking, not really. I'm going to meet his parents for the first time, at the same time as I'm thinking of ending things. Jake once said, "Sometimes a thought is closer to truth, to reality, than an action. You can say anything, you can do anything, but you can't fake a thought." And here's what I'm thinking: I don't want to be here. I'm thinking of ending things. Iain Reid explores the depths of the human psyche, questioning consciousness, free will, the value of relationships, fear, and the limitations of solitude. Reminiscent of José Saramago's early work, Michel Faber's cult classic Under the Skin, and Lionel Shriver's We Need to Talk About Kevin, this tense and atmospheric novel will haunt you long after the last page is turned.

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