HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Principles of Literary Criticism (Routledge…
Loading...

Principles of Literary Criticism (Routledge Classics) (Volume 90) (original 1924; edition 2001)

by I. A. Richards (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
294170,109 (3.31)3
Ivor Armstrong Richards was one of the founders of modern literary criticism. He enthused a generation of writers and readers and was an influential supporter of the young T.S. Eliot. Principles of Literary Criticismwas the text that first established his reputation and pioneered the movement that became known as the 'New Criticism'. Highly controversial when first published, Principles of Literary Criticismremains a work which no one with a serious interest in literature can afford to ignore.… (more)
Member:MariaLW
Title:Principles of Literary Criticism (Routledge Classics) (Volume 90)
Authors:I. A. Richards (Author)
Info:Routledge (2001), Edition: 2, 296 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Principles of Literary Criticism by I. A. Richards (1924)

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Richards's attempt to put criticism on an objective footing using psychology as a base largely fails. The psychology is too tentative and too vaguely sketched to support the heavy burden it is intended to bear. On the other hand, many things which are baldly stated as self-evident no longer seem so from a perspective 90 years after they were proposed. Much of the book is difficult, partly because Richards is so delicately careful in almost any statement that the argument gets lost in what amounts to circumlocution. Paradoxically, his rhetorical strategy of avoiding jargon and using instead simple direct ordinary language has the effect of making the argument prolix and more convoluted than it would have been if he would have resorted to the professional vocabulary created to discuss these matters. The book is most interesting when he is doing practical criticism, where his discrimination, wit, and insight produce interesting results. ( )
1 vote sjnorquist | Dec 29, 2012 |
no reviews | add a review

Belongs to Publisher Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
O monstrous! but one half-pennyworth of bread to this intolerable deal of sack! - The First Part of King Henry the Fourth
Dedication
First words
The literature of Criticism is not small or negligible, and its chief figures, from Aristotle onwards, have often been among the first intellects of their age.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Ivor Armstrong Richards was one of the founders of modern literary criticism. He enthused a generation of writers and readers and was an influential supporter of the young T.S. Eliot. Principles of Literary Criticismwas the text that first established his reputation and pioneered the movement that became known as the 'New Criticism'. Highly controversial when first published, Principles of Literary Criticismremains a work which no one with a serious interest in literature can afford to ignore.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.31)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 6
3.5
4 5
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,314,499 books! | Top bar: Always visible