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Aristotle's Metaphysics
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Aristotle's Metaphysics

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Arthur Madigan presents a clear, accurate new translation of the third book (Beta) of Aristotle's Metaphysics, together with two related chapters from the eleventh book (Kappa). Madigan's accompanying commentary gives detailed guidance to these texts, in which Aristotle sets out what he takesto be the main problems of metaphysics or 'first philosophy' and assesses possible solutions to them.… (more)
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Metafisica de Aristoteles by Aristoteles

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"It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it."

Metaphysics is a branch of philosophy that studies the ultimate structure and constitution of reality, of that which is real, insofar as it is real. The term, which means literally “what comes after physics,” was used to refer to the treatise by Aristotle on what he himself called “first philosophy.”

Plato, in his theory of forms, separates the sensible world (appearances) of the intelligible world (ideas) and the intelligible world was the only reality, the foundation of all truth.

Aristotle believed that it is the physical world that is observable. He rejected Plato’s transcendentalism ( his notion that there is a higher reality that is only graspable by the mind).

In Plato's theory, material objects are changeable and not real in themselves; rather, they correspond to an ideal, eternal, and immutable Form by a common name, and this Form can be perceived only by the intellect. Thus a thing perceived to be beautiful in this world is in fact an imperfect manifestation of the Form of Beauty. Aristotle's arguments against this theory were numerous. Ultimately he rejected Plato's ideas as poetic but empty language; as a scientist and empiricist he preferred to focus on the reality of the material world.

Substance is a unique category: it is basic. For Aristotle, a substance is a particular thing and its properties. The substance is the matter and the secondary categories or properties are form. A substance consists of matter and form. Form is not a separable realm as it was for Plato; it must exist with matter.

While Plato holds that the more abstract Forms are the most real, Aristotle thinks that the more concrete things are most real.

Whereas Plato's philosophy is intergrally positioned around his understanding of the heavenly Forms, Aristotle's Metaphysics and other works depend on bottom-level truths that lead to truth.

Deduction refers to a logical system that draws conclusions from higher truths about the way things are or are not. Induction, its complementary oppositite, refers to a logical system that draws its conclusions via extrapolation of lower truths. Deduction relies on abstract truths trickling down into arguments, where as induction involves logical positions construction arguments from the ground up.

In the Metaphysics, Aristotle creates arguments about the way things are true that depend heavily on observable or demonstrable conditions in the natural world.

Essentially, the difference can be understood this way. Plato looks up into heaven to find truth. Aristotle looks around and uses logic to find truth. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Apr 23, 2022 |
not really what I want from a translation (see Comments)
  lidaskoteina | Jan 30, 2022 |
12/8/21
  laplantelibrary | Dec 8, 2021 |
12/8/21
  laplantelibrary | Dec 8, 2021 |
12/8/21
  laplantelibrary | Dec 8, 2021 |
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» Add other authors (44 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Aristotelesprimary authorall editionscalculated
Reale, GiovanniEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Apostle, Hippocrates G.Translatormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Azcárate, Patricio deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blánquez Augier, R.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Candel, MiguelIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
García Yebra, ValentínEditor literariosecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jaeger, WernerEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jatakari, TuijaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Knuuttila, SimoContributorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ladan, TomislavTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Näätsaari, KatiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pohjanlehto, PetriTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Torres Samsó, J. F.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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By nature, all men long to know.

All men by nature desire understanding.--(Apostle translation, 1979)
When a great and fertile thinker has much to say in a limited time and without the present speedy means of having it recorded in detail, he chooses, if he has a sense of proportion, a condensed form of expression in order to cover the important points and so state the maximum.
--Preface (Apostle translation, 1979)
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Arthur Madigan presents a clear, accurate new translation of the third book (Beta) of Aristotle's Metaphysics, together with two related chapters from the eleventh book (Kappa). Madigan's accompanying commentary gives detailed guidance to these texts, in which Aristotle sets out what he takesto be the main problems of metaphysics or 'first philosophy' and assesses possible solutions to them.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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