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A Place to Stand: Poems, 1969-76 by Philip…
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A Place to Stand: Poems, 1969-76

by Philip Holmes

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0856460346, Paperback)

`Freshness of vision and the unexpected turn of phrase distinguish Philip Holmes' first collection', Lyman Andrews wrote of `Three Sections' (Anvil, 1971) in `The Sunday Times'. His second book establishes him among the best of younger English poets. The first four groups of poems (for which he won an Eric Gregory award in 1975) are mainly autobiographical; they trace a journey from and return to England, exploring the resultant changes in perspective. A long sequence `The Covenant' then meditates on revolution and change in a wider context, as exemplified by the Puritan movement. The poem is based on the life of Richard Rogers, an early East Anglian preacher, whose struggle to live `with regard of good ordre' reflects many of our own dilemmas. In the final section, Philip Holmes returns to the more personal themes of earlier parts.

(retrieved from Amazon Sun, 17 Jan 2016 06:54:06 -0500)

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