HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Truth About Olive Oil by Joyce Zborower
Loading...

The Truth About Olive Oil

by Joyce Zborower

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
2None2,551,640NoneNone
Recently added byKajola, ScruffyNerf

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

Forward by Jim Henry President Texas Olive Ranch Executive Director Texas Olive Oil Council The Truth about Olive Oil is NOT a cook book. There are no recipes for cooking in the Mediterranean style. There are no pizza recipes. If anything, you could say this book is about a celebration of the benefits the lowly little olive showers on those who embrace its many flavors and colors by using it - both internally (by eating it) and externally (by rubbing it on their skin and in their hair). Its health giving benefits (anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties) are legendary and can be traced back to its earliest uses well before the time of Christ. In the pages of this book, I hope to stimulate further interest in the use of olives and olive oil by presenting various "how to do it" scenarios that are practical and fun. For instance, making table olives is an easy and fun thing to do that takes very little actual "doing" on your part. Most of the curing time can be spent by your doing other things while the curing medium does the job of making the fruit edible. I provide specific instructions on how to do this. And what about getting olives from your own tree(s) pressed so you can enjoy home-grown olive oil? You might think that only commercial growers can do this. Well, I found two commercial olive oil processors who will accept your smaller loads of olives, combine them with other small loads, do the pressing and the bottling and return the resultant oil to you on a prorated basis. In addition, I tell you about the various grades of olive oil and what they mean to you in terms of their nutritional value. I think you'll be quite surprised at what you discover. The external uses of olive oil (and some internal uses as well) all involve using this liquid as a form of folk remedy. It's a skin lotion to soothe rough chapped elbows or lips; it's a diaper rash cure; it's a massage oil for easing aches and pains; it's a lot of things and we've only just scratched the surface. There are more inside the book. What you'll get out of reading this book is a greater appreciation for this elixir that can enhance your life and health in ways you may never even have thought of.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

None

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 124,931,343 books! | Top bar: Always visible