HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Clock Of The Long Now: Time And…
Loading...

The Clock Of The Long Now: Time And Responsibility (original 1999; edition 1999)

by Stewart Brand (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
546937,240 (3.94)None
Using the designing and building of the Clock of the Long Now as a framework, this is a book about the practical use of long time perspective: how to get it, how to use it, how to keep it in and out of sight. Here are the central questions it inspires: How do we make long-term thinking automatic and common instead of difficult and rare? Discipline in thought allows freedom. One needs the space and reliability to predict continuity to have the confidence not to be afraid of revolutions Taking the time to think of the future is more essential now than ever, as culture accelerates beyond its ability to be measured Probable things are vastly outnumbered by countless near-impossible eventualities. Reality is statistically forced to be extraordinary; fiction is not allowed this freedom This is a potent book that combines the chronicling of fantastic technology with equally visionary philosophical inquiry.… (more)
Member:Manny4321
Title:The Clock Of The Long Now: Time And Responsibility
Authors:Stewart Brand (Author)
Info:Basic Books (1999), Edition: 1st, 208 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

The Clock of the Long Now by Stewart Brand (1999)

Recently added bytarsel, CocoDog, Manny4321, tbr00, HannaMcKae
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
I wish that all of our thinking could extend out 10,000 years, a necessity that becomes ever more true with the constant decline of our attention spans. ( )
  Tohno | Feb 9, 2022 |
Great idea, pretty terrible book. ( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
Anathem is one of my all-time favorite books, but this still has interesting insights on levels of interaction between fashion, culture, law, infrastructure, etc ( )
  nicdevera | Oct 1, 2020 |
A great book that never misses its mark. It entertains, informs, and educates the reader all throughout its duration.

Recommended for thinkers, philosophers, academics, and students. ( )
  DanielSTJ | Dec 17, 2018 |
Book reading as a form of meditation. ( )
  jasoncomely | Dec 28, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Time and responsibility. What a prime subject for vapid truisms and gaseous generalities adding up to the world's most boring sermon.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Using the designing and building of the Clock of the Long Now as a framework, this is a book about the practical use of long time perspective: how to get it, how to use it, how to keep it in and out of sight. Here are the central questions it inspires: How do we make long-term thinking automatic and common instead of difficult and rare? Discipline in thought allows freedom. One needs the space and reliability to predict continuity to have the confidence not to be afraid of revolutions Taking the time to think of the future is more essential now than ever, as culture accelerates beyond its ability to be measured Probable things are vastly outnumbered by countless near-impossible eventualities. Reality is statistically forced to be extraordinary; fiction is not allowed this freedom This is a potent book that combines the chronicling of fantastic technology with equally visionary philosophical inquiry.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5
1
1.5
2 5
2.5
3 18
3.5 1
4 28
4.5 4
5 22

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 176,546,342 books! | Top bar: Always visible