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First Person: New Media as Story,…
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First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game (edition 2006)

by Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Pat Harrigan (Editor)

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1432120,031 (3.38)None
Member:clevercelt
Title:First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game
Authors:Noah Wardrip-Fruin
Other authors:Pat Harrigan (Editor)
Info:The MIT Press (2006), Paperback, 354 pages
Collections:Your library
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First Person: New Media as Story, Performance, and Game by Noah Wardrip-Fruin

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Dense, but made me realize a few things. ( )
  morbusiff | May 9, 2013 |
A collection of selected essays, carefully structured and augmented with expert commentary. The focus is squarely on new media artifacts (rather than on the communication being mediated or the actors communicating) and the key topic is the ongoing debate on story vs. game: Are new media artifacts best understood narratologically or ludologically? The collection serves as a very useful introduction to new media topics in game studies and digital arts.
  jonas.lowgren | Mar 14, 2011 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Noah Wardrip-Fruinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Harrigan, PatEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Aarseth, EspenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bernstein, MarkContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cayley, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Crawford, ChrisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Douglas, J. YellowleesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Drucker, JohannaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Eskelinen, MarkkuContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Flanagan, MaryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Frasca, GonzaloContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gorbet, MattContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Greco, DianeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gromala, DianeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hardagon, AndrewContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hayles, N. KatherineContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ito, MizukoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jenkins, HenryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jeremijenko, NatalieContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Juul, JesperContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Laurel, BrendaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Loyall, BryanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mateas, MichaelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
McKenzie, JonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Montfort, NickContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Moulthrop, StuartContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Murray, Janet H.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pearce, CeliaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Penny, SimonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Perlin, KenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Raley, RitaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ross, RebeccaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sack, WarrenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Schechner, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Seaman, BillContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sengers, PhoebeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Stern, AndrewContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Strickland, StephanieContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Suchman, LucyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Thacker, EugeneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Utterback, CamilleContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vesna, VictoriaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walker, JillContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wortzel, AdrianneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wright, WillContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Zimmerman, EricContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0262731754, Paperback)

Electronic games have established a huge international market, significantly outselling non-digital games; people spend more money on The Sims than on "Monopoly" or even on "Magic: the Gathering." Yet it is widely believed that the market for electronic literature -- predicted by some to be the future of the written word -- languishes. Even bestselling author Stephen King achieved disappointing results with his online publication of "Riding the Bullet" and "The Plant."Isn't it possible, though, that many hugely successful computer games -- those that depend on or at least utilize storytelling conventions of narrative, character, and theme -- can be seen as examples of electronic literature? And isn't it likely that the truly significant new forms of electronic literature will prove to be (like games) so deeply interactive and procedural that it would be impossible to present them as paper-like "e-books"? The editors of First Person have gathered a remarkably diverse group of new media theorists and practitioners to consider the relationship between "story" and "game," as well as the new kinds of artistic creation (literary, performative, playful) that have become possible in the digital environment.This landmark collection is organized as a series of discussions among creators and theorists; each section includes three presentations, with each presentation followed by two responses. Topics considered range from "Cyberdrama" to "Ludology" (the study of games), to "The Pixel/The Line" to "Beyond Chat." The conversational structure inspired contributors to revise, update, and expand their presentations as they prepared them for the book, and the panel discussions have overflowed into a First Person web site (created in conjunction with the online journal Electronic Book Review).

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:12 -0400)

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