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The Akhenaten Adventure by P. B. Kerr
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The Akhenaten Adventure (2004)

by P. B. Kerr

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Children of the Lamp (1)

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1,287256,086 (3.7)22
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Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
Ok, I've read the other reviews. The ones that are concerned about respect shown to other cultures shouldn't be. The dissing jokes are a special kind of British humor - think a very tame Monty Python. And besides that, at one point a character voices Kerr's plea that we respect other people, maybe starting by giving mummies a decent burial. And besides that, djinn don't have a lot of respect for people - any people, of any nationality. And besides that (!) there are other hints in the book that the whole thing is supposed to be amusing - for example referring to the British Museum as the BM. (I bet that this is not Kerr's invention, but a real British thing he shared with us.)

I do like and recommend this version, with the Afterwords section by Scholastic. V. illuminating and fun.

Now the book may still not be your cup of tea, and you may not want to buy it for your classroom for fear of repercussions from the PC police, but if you've been thinking of reading it don't be afraid to. It was a lot of fun and had some neat ideas about the djinn tradition and the rules of the three wishes. Oh, and it 'book-talked' several other worthy reads, too.

I'm not a fan of series. I like learning about the characters and their world, but when subsequent books devolve into a series of battles, chase scenes, and cliffhangers I lose interest. I do have the next three books in this series but I have not decided whether to read on or not. (This one did have sufficient closure to stop.) ( )
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Apr 14, 2015 |
Children of the Lamp seems to have a great plot but it didn't seem to draw me in as much as I believed it would. Over all the characterization seems to push you away from the book rather than draw you to read on, I most likely won't be continuing the series. I will admit however that it wasn't a bad book and I wouldn't tell anyone not to read it of they picked it up on their own. ( )
  booklover_rem | Nov 27, 2014 |
(6.5)
  mshampson | Oct 16, 2014 |
Very adventurous! All about 12 year old twins finding out they are born genies, learning to use their powers. Not the best writing style but a bit of fun ( )
  Breony | Jun 9, 2014 |
This could have been an entertaining book if the author didn't use characterisation that relied on casual racism to differentiate between characters. The twin's uncle renames people because it's too hard to pronounce names, one of the Djinn learned english through Irish TV and talks in Irish sayings, not in Irish style grammar; the french woman is dismissed that she will believe she drank too much wine for breakfast, all of this overshadowed the story for me and made it less enjoyable.

The core story was quite interesting, two children who are the children of Djinn come into their powers when their wisdom teeth come in and are sent to their uncle, Nimrod, in London to learn more about their heritage and get involved in adventures with the more evil djinns.

I won't be reading more in this series, the lazy characterisations pulled me out of the story and made it a harder read than it should have been. ( )
1 vote wyvernfriend | May 23, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 25 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
P. B. Kerrprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Keith, RonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This book was written for, and with the help of, William Falcon Finlay Kerr, Charles Foster Kerr, and Naomi Rose Kerr, all of London SW19.
May you always know happiness.
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It was just after noon on a hot summer's day in Egypt.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0439670209, Paperback)

You can tell from the very first page that P. B. Kerr had great fun writing his novel, The Akhenaten Adventure. The way the author introduces his cleverly named characters, the atmospheric setting, the fun tone of his narration--all indicate that a hugely entertaining story is in store. The first installment of his Children of the Lamp sequence is set firmly in the present day, but it soon breaks away and encompasses several wonderfully colorful parts of the globe, England and Egypt included.

John and Philippa Gaunt, two twelve-year-old not-very-identical twins, live a privileged life on the Upper East of Manhattan with their wealthy parents and two curiously-mannered Rottweilers named Alan and Neil. The twins realize there's something amiss with their world when a string of strange things begin to happen after their wisdom teeth are extracted--they dream the same dreams, become stronger, their zits clear up, and wishes wished in their presence inexplicably come true. And, when their estranged Uncle Nimrod asks them to come to England for the summer during one such shared dream, the discovery of their destiny is set in motion.

John and Phillippa discover that they are descended from a long line of Djinn, have great inherent powers. They must call on these powers a lot sooner than they anticipated, though, because the ancient Egyptian pharaoh Akhenaten is not as dead as history has so far declared and his legion of seventy magical djinn could tip the balance of power in the magical realm and affect the whole world order.

P.B. Kerr, under his given name Philip Kerr, is the author of several bestselling thrillers for adult readers. His debut novel for children is a slick, zeitgeisty fantasy adventure that is sure to win him a new raft of fans. The Blue Djinn of Babylon is next up for those who get hooked. (Age 10 and over) --John McLay

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:46:31 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

When twelve-year-old twins Philippa and John discover that they are descended from a long line of djinn, their mother sends them away to their Uncle Nimrod, who takes them to Cairo where he starts to teach them about their extraordinary powers.

» see all 5 descriptions

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