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Delírio (Portuguese Edition) by Laura…
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Delírio (Portuguese Edition) (original 2004; edition 2010)

by Laura Restrepo (Author)

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5772336,321 (3.6)41
Aguilar returns home after a short business trip only to find that his wife, Agustina, has gone crazy. Having no idea what could have happened during his absence, and hoping to help her overcome this crisis, he begins to investigate, what he discovers are deep and disturbing facts hidden in the past of the woman he loves. Delirio is a story of love and madness, mysteries and secrets in the midst of the breakdown of Colombian society. The author shows an uncommon narrative energy, in which the suspense is held until a hopeful end that closes a beautiful novel. Wonderfully constructed, magnificently narrated and brilliantly developed.… (more)
Member:PaulaMota
Title:Delírio (Portuguese Edition)
Authors:Laura Restrepo (Author)
Info:Presença (2010)
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Delirium by Laura Restrepo (2004)

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» See also 41 mentions

Spanish (11)  English (10)  Italian (1)  Hebrew (1)  All languages (23)
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Restrepo swings through perspectives, without giving much clue of chronology and it wasn’t until I’d settled into the different voices that I began to get into it. The first half of the book I must have read in small chunks as it left me confused; the last third I read in two sittings and that was only because I was disturbed. It’s a book that’s worth the time it takes to get into – uncomfortable but, apart from one scene, not excessively unpleasant. What trips you up is your own imagination which is trying to solve the mystery of what happened to poor Augustina And no wonder your imagination is panicking as the novel is set in late 1980s Colombia during the Pablo Escobar era and you’ve got drugs, money laundering and terrorism casually filling the pages. ( )
  KittyCatrinCat | Aug 29, 2021 |
Un hombre regresa a casa después de un corto viaje de negocios y encuentra que su esposa ha enloquecido completamente.No tiene idea de qué le pudo haber ocurrido durante los tres días de su ausencia, y con el fin de ayudarla a salir de la crisis empieza a investigar, sólo para descubrir lo poco que sabe sobre las profundas perturbaciones en el pasado dela mujer que ama.
  museosanalberto | May 26, 2020 |
I really did not like this book for a number of reasons.

The first couple, though minor in the overall scheme of things, have to do with the punctuation and layout of the paragraphs/sentences. I did not like how there were no quotation marks (making it difficult to discern when characters were talking and when they were simply thinking to themselves. The lack of question marks bothered me a great deal as well. As far as the paragraphs go, there were not nearly enough. Sentences, when they had actual punctuation marks, were smashed together to the point that it became difficult to tell who was talking or doing something.

The characters themselves were profoundly annoying. Augustina clearly has something wrong in her head and was in desperate need of professional help, which her family's money should have been able to provide, but no one gave enough of a damn to even get her that. The story taking place in a Columbia rife with poverty and violence and drugs clearly has an effect on getting her these things, but her money should have meant that she could leave the country and get help elsewhere.

The men, with the exception of Bichito perhaps, were are all way too full of that bullshit machismo, some to a more annoying degree than others. The women were all closer to dolls or playthings for the men than actual human beings. They were made to bare the brunt of the men's scorn, fury, and lashings out and then were made to clean up the messes (both physically and mentally) afterwards, especially Blanca, though all the others fell into roles similar to hers.

Overall, the story-telling, though not quite a jumbled mess, was twisted in the sense that it was difficult to tell who the narrator was and when exactly those events were taking/had taken place. I spent most of the story thinking that Midas McAllister and Aguilar were the same person, when in fact they were completely different. In the end, this book barely missed making in onto my "terrible" shelf. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
I really did not like this book for a number of reasons.

The first couple, though minor in the overall scheme of things, have to do with the punctuation and layout of the paragraphs/sentences. I did not like how there were no quotation marks (making it difficult to discern when characters were talking and when they were simply thinking to themselves. The lack of question marks bothered me a great deal as well. As far as the paragraphs go, there were not nearly enough. Sentences, when they had actual punctuation marks, were smashed together to the point that it became difficult to tell who was talking or doing something.

The characters themselves were profoundly annoying. Augustina clearly has something wrong in her head and was in desperate need of professional help, which her family's money should have been able to provide, but no one gave enough of a damn to even get her that. The story taking place in a Columbia rife with poverty and violence and drugs clearly has an effect on getting her these things, but her money should have meant that she could leave the country and get help elsewhere.

The men, with the exception of Bichito perhaps, were are all way too full of that bullshit machismo, some to a more annoying degree than others. The women were all closer to dolls or playthings for the men than actual human beings. They were made to bare the brunt of the men's scorn, fury, and lashings out and then were made to clean up the messes (both physically and mentally) afterwards, especially Blanca, though all the others fell into roles similar to hers.

Overall, the story-telling, though not quite a jumbled mess, was twisted in the sense that it was difficult to tell who the narrator was and when exactly those events were taking/had taken place. I spent most of the story thinking that Midas McAllister and Aguilar were the same person, when in fact they were completely different. In the end, this book barely missed making in onto my "terrible" shelf. ( )
  Moore31 | Feb 25, 2018 |
Really 3.5 stars. The writing is pretty stunning but the story loses momentum several times. The background of the story is Columbian society during the Pablo Escobar years (guessing it was written in the 80's) and it's a pretty fascinating lens to a somewhat claustrophobic story of a woman going crazy and the people around her who are helping (or not). ( )
  ltfitch1 | Jun 5, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
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Aguilar returns home after a short business trip only to find that his wife, Agustina, has gone crazy. Having no idea what could have happened during his absence, and hoping to help her overcome this crisis, he begins to investigate, what he discovers are deep and disturbing facts hidden in the past of the woman he loves. Delirio is a story of love and madness, mysteries and secrets in the midst of the breakdown of Colombian society. The author shows an uncommon narrative energy, in which the suspense is held until a hopeful end that closes a beautiful novel. Wonderfully constructed, magnificently narrated and brilliantly developed.

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