HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Rome and Jerusalem: The Clash of Ancient Civilizations

by Martin Goodman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
664834,829 (3.75)13
A magisterial history of the titanic struggle between the Roman and Jewish worlds that led to the destruction of Jerusalem. Martin Goodman--equally renowned in Jewish and in Roman studies--examines this conflict, its causes, and its consequences with unprecedented authority and thoroughness. He delineates the incompatibility between the cultural, political, and religious beliefs and practices of the two peoples and explains how Rome's interests were served by a policy of brutality against the Jews. At the same time, Christians began to distance themselves from their origins, becoming increasingly hostile toward Jews as Christian influence spread within the empire. This is the authoritative work of how these two great civilizations collided and how the reverberations are felt to this day.--From publisher description.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 13 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Martin Goodman explores the history of a titanic struggle whose repercussions are still felt today. In 70CE, after four years of Jewish rebellion, Roman legions devastated the great city of Jerusalem. Sixty years later, its ruin was completed when Emperor Hadrian built a new city on top of it that Jews were forbidden even to enter. In this highly acclaimed book, Martin Goodman examines the background and course of this titanic conflict - from the political ambitions of Roman military leaders to the spread of Christian influence through the empire - and its lasting consequences. 'In this remarkable book Martin Goodman casts a truly fresh eye over well-known figures and events'
  StFrancisofAssisi | Sep 6, 2021 |
This is exhausting stuff--Goodman knows a lot about this period, and he has put it all in this book, which would have been better served divided in two, or perhaps three. The 'comparison' stuff is unhelpful; saying 'the Roman political system was like this, and the Hasmonean political system was like that' over and over, just subbing out 'political system' for something else gets very tedious, very quickly. I read it because Goodman's history of Judaism was very, very good, and because I'm teaching some stuff in this vague arena this semester, so I thought it would be useful. It was not. The imbecilic subtitle doesn't help, but I'm sure that was the publisher's fault. I blame the editor for the generally low standard of prose; again, Goodman can do better, as his more recent big book shows.

Having said all of that, it'll be a great reference work if I ever need to look up something about the second temple era, the end of it, or even early imperial Roman history. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
A well researched and comprehensive analysis of the history of Roman-Jewish relations from the first century BC through the third century A.D. The author is commendably objective in his presentation of both sides of these often complex relations over time. This is a complicated yet highly informative work.

I would have rated this book far higher except for the fact that it contains a significant amount of minutia that does not move the story forward in a compelling fashion. To the contrary, much of the middle section of the work bogs down and can become a bit tedious.

Recommended for those with a particular interest in this fascinating period- but be prepared for a substantial time commitment. As for those with a more general interest, there are probably better books out there. ( )
  la2bkk | Aug 12, 2020 |
This is a Well-written account of the similarities and differences as well as the history of both cities. The book gives plenty of interesting information as well as good pictures in an engaging manner. I bought this book expecting a history of the jewish revolt against Rome but it gave me so much more. This book is highly-recommended. ( )
  zen_923 | Dec 25, 2016 |
His main point: origin of antisemitism almost an accident, a by product of new emperor Vespasian's need to have a victory to prove his credentials. This followed on equally random acts of incompetence by Roman military leaders on the ground in Judea. The anti- Jewish stance then maintained by subsequent emperors (with 1 or 2 exceptions) and then picked up and magnified by Constantine and the Church. Previously Jews had just been another minority religion within the Empire and tolerated as such. Convincing case but seems amazing that something so long-lasting and intense should have such shallow roots. The main bulk of the book is more a cultural comparison of the Roman and Jewish world-views, more info than I really wanted. I personally felt much more at home in the pre-Christian Graeco-Roman world, with its scepticism and love of pleasure and the arts; the Jewish world felt disturbingly like fundamentalist America or, unsurprisingly, settler/orthodox Israel today. ( )
  vguy | Nov 14, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
for Sarah
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

A magisterial history of the titanic struggle between the Roman and Jewish worlds that led to the destruction of Jerusalem. Martin Goodman--equally renowned in Jewish and in Roman studies--examines this conflict, its causes, and its consequences with unprecedented authority and thoroughness. He delineates the incompatibility between the cultural, political, and religious beliefs and practices of the two peoples and explains how Rome's interests were served by a policy of brutality against the Jews. At the same time, Christians began to distance themselves from their origins, becoming increasingly hostile toward Jews as Christian influence spread within the empire. This is the authoritative work of how these two great civilizations collided and how the reverberations are felt to this day.--From publisher description.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.75)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 11
3.5 5
4 16
4.5 5
5 6

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 204,753,239 books! | Top bar: Always visible