HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans…
Loading...

Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation (edition 2016)

by Nicholas Guyatt (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
601346,411 (3.6)1
"Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Native Americans in their cherished proposition that "all men are created equal"? The usual answer is racism. Historian Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart that, from the Revolution through the Civil War, most white liberals believed in the unity of all human beings. Many tried to build a multiracial America in the early nineteenth century, but ultimately adopted the belief that non-whites should create their own republics elsewhere: in an Indian state in the West, or a colony for free blacks in Liberia. Herein lie the origins of "separate but equal." Essential reading for anyone hoping to understand today's racial tensions, Bind Us Apart reveals why racial justice in the United States continues to be an elusive goal: despite our best efforts, we have never been able to imagine a fully inclusive, multiracial society."--Provided by publisher. ""All men are created equal" is America's most cherished proposition. But for more than a century after Thomas Jefferson wrote those words, the Founding Fathers and their successors failed to extend the promise of the Declaration of Independence to blacks and Indians. Why? We take refuge in the notion that white people at the time were the prisoners of racist ideas and that we today are more enlightened. In this popular view, the history of America demonstrates how racist beliefs have been slowly discarded, with later generations realizing the dream of liberty and equality. But as Nick Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart, white Americans from the founding to the Civil War were not confident racists who blithely condemned blacks and Indians to inferior status. Instead, they were confused and tortured souls, and often remarkably conscious of the damage that racism might do to the nation's future. They looked for ways to reconcile their principles and their prejudices, and sometimes succeeded: in the first decades of the United States, blacks went to the polls alongside whites in some northern states, and federal officials promoted intermarriage between Indians and frontier settlers in the hope that racial divisions would disappear in the West"--Provided by publisher.… (more)
Member:MichaelCYork
Title:Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation
Authors:Nicholas Guyatt (Author)
Info:Basic Books (2016), Edition: 1, 416 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Bind Us Apart: How Enlightened Americans Invented Racial Segregation by Nicholas Guyatt

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Interesting history but not really my cup of tea. How could someone like Thomas Jefferson write words like "...that all men are created equal" yet still own slaves? How or why would he write these words and yet father children with his slave, Sally Hemings? How to reconcile this?
 
This specific question is not the focus of Guyatt's book but it is certainly one that comes up and is something to consider while reading. The purpose of Guyatt's writing is to look at the relationship of black people and Native Americans to the Europeans and colonists who came to what would be the United States and would eventually lead to racial segregation that still has repercussions through today.
 
The history is disturbing. Informative, but disturbing. The premise was that black and Native peoples were "degraded" and while in theory they could be "integrated" or "civilized" by getting rid of slavery (for example), or by mixed marriages (which was disturbing for other reasons), in the end what it came down to was that the colonists and settlers needed the Native American land and the labor of black slaves, as 'The New York Times' notes. So instead of integrating, it became easier to take the Native American land and eventually segregating black people physically, legally, etc.
 
Overall I found the book to be a bit dry and academic but it is worth the read. For people who want to claim racism is over this might be a good resource to see the influence of racism and how its affects have carried down through the centuries in the US and to today. ( )
1 vote HoldMyBook | Feb 11, 2018 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Native Americans in their cherished proposition that "all men are created equal"? The usual answer is racism. Historian Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart that, from the Revolution through the Civil War, most white liberals believed in the unity of all human beings. Many tried to build a multiracial America in the early nineteenth century, but ultimately adopted the belief that non-whites should create their own republics elsewhere: in an Indian state in the West, or a colony for free blacks in Liberia. Herein lie the origins of "separate but equal." Essential reading for anyone hoping to understand today's racial tensions, Bind Us Apart reveals why racial justice in the United States continues to be an elusive goal: despite our best efforts, we have never been able to imagine a fully inclusive, multiracial society."--Provided by publisher. ""All men are created equal" is America's most cherished proposition. But for more than a century after Thomas Jefferson wrote those words, the Founding Fathers and their successors failed to extend the promise of the Declaration of Independence to blacks and Indians. Why? We take refuge in the notion that white people at the time were the prisoners of racist ideas and that we today are more enlightened. In this popular view, the history of America demonstrates how racist beliefs have been slowly discarded, with later generations realizing the dream of liberty and equality. But as Nick Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart, white Americans from the founding to the Civil War were not confident racists who blithely condemned blacks and Indians to inferior status. Instead, they were confused and tortured souls, and often remarkably conscious of the damage that racism might do to the nation's future. They looked for ways to reconcile their principles and their prejudices, and sometimes succeeded: in the first decades of the United States, blacks went to the polls alongside whites in some northern states, and federal officials promoted intermarriage between Indians and frontier settlers in the hope that racial divisions would disappear in the West"--Provided by publisher.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.6)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 1
4.5 1
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,671,468 books! | Top bar: Always visible