HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Shahnameh: The Persian Book of Kings

by Firdausi

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
554437,486 (4.13)4
"The definitive translation by Dick Davis of the great national epic of Iran--now newly revised and expanded to be the most complete English-language edition --has revised and expanded his acclaimed translation of Ferdowsi's masterpiece, adding more than seventy pages of newly translated text. Davis's elegant combination of prose and verse allows the poetry of the Shahnameh to sing its own tales directly, interspersed sparingly with clearly marked explanations to ease along modern readers. Originally composed for the Samanid princes of Khorasan in the tenth century, the Shahnameh is among the greatest works of world literature. This prodigious narrative tells the story of pre-Islamic Persia, from the mythical creation of the world and the dawn of Persian civilization through the seventh-century Arab conquest. The stories of the Shahnameh are deeply embedded in Persian culture and beyond, as attested by their appearance in such works as The Kite Runner and the love poems of Rumi and Hafez. For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. --… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 4 mentions

Showing 3 of 3
A great national epic. REad this many years ago, and was rivetted. The story of Rustam and Sohrab reverberates through much of the Matiere de Bretagne, I think--how did it get there? Crusades? The book evokes a world whose physicality is the same as ours but whose manner of manifesting it is so different . . . should you need a long vacation from your life and all its ways, read this. ( )
  AnnKlefstad | Feb 4, 2022 |
Written for Sultan Maḥmūd of Ghazna and completed in 1010, the Shāh-nāmeh is a poem of nearly 60,000 verses, mainly based on the Khvatay-nāmak, a history of the kings of Persia in Pahlavi (Middle Persian) from mythical times down to the 7th century. Ferdowsī versified and updated the story to the downfall of the Sāsānian empire (mid-7th century), and, for nearly 1,000 years, it has remained one of the most popular works in the Persian-speaking world. ( )
  Marcos_Augusto | Feb 1, 2022 |
What Nöldeke called the iranische Nationalepos (the Iranian national epic), Ferdowsi's Shahnameh ('King-book') is the basis of Iranian identity. Based on an older prose translation of an earlier Middle Persian King-book but recomposed by Ferdowsi into verse, the Shahnameh in over 50,000 lines tells both the tale of the mythical past of Iran and its pre-Islamic history from Alexander till the fall of the Sasanian emperors, whose exploits are recast into an epic romance. The middle section, the heroic age, contains the most celebrated part of the epic, the tale of the exploits of Rustum (the foundation, amongst many other things, for Matthew Arnold's Rustum and Sohreb: an Episode).

Dick Davis' book here is the most complete one-volume translation in English. His translation is prose; on occasion, however, he moves to a verse translation to reflect specific lyrical passages. His translation is considerably less condensed than most other English translations; still, in 928 pages the translator cannot do magic and so is forced to considerably abridge the text. Sadly, this means a particularly harsh trimming to the Sasanian period, so the historian wishing to read about, for example, Peroz and his wars with the White Huns in AD 469 and AD 484 (one of the better-known episodes due to Procopius' report in Greek and al-Tabari's account in Arabic) must look elsewhere, in the complete verse translation of the Warner brothers.

As to the edition of Davis' translation, I strongly urge the reader to obtain the Viking hard-back rather than the Penguin paperback. For a book of this size, the hard cover is worth looking out for. There is also a three-volume edition from Mage (an Iranian-American press for whom Davis first did the translation in parts), profusely-illustrated with miniatures from manuscripts and so forth that may be to many people's taste; it is, unfortunately, prohibitively expensive at almost four hundred dollars. ( )
  shikari | Apr 11, 2010 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Firdausiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Davis, DickTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nafisi, AzarForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
This is the Davis translation omnibus of The Lion and the Throne, Fathers and Sons, and The Sunset of Empire.  Please do not combine with other selection of the Shahnameh.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC
"The definitive translation by Dick Davis of the great national epic of Iran--now newly revised and expanded to be the most complete English-language edition --has revised and expanded his acclaimed translation of Ferdowsi's masterpiece, adding more than seventy pages of newly translated text. Davis's elegant combination of prose and verse allows the poetry of the Shahnameh to sing its own tales directly, interspersed sparingly with clearly marked explanations to ease along modern readers. Originally composed for the Samanid princes of Khorasan in the tenth century, the Shahnameh is among the greatest works of world literature. This prodigious narrative tells the story of pre-Islamic Persia, from the mythical creation of the world and the dawn of Persian civilization through the seventh-century Arab conquest. The stories of the Shahnameh are deeply embedded in Persian culture and beyond, as attested by their appearance in such works as The Kite Runner and the love poems of Rumi and Hafez. For more than sixty-five years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. --

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.13)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 7
3.5 3
4 13
4.5 1
5 17

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 180,269,195 books! | Top bar: Always visible