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Knowing Future Time in and Through Greek Historiography (Trends in…

by Alexandra Lianeri (Editor)

Other authors: Emily Baragwanath (Contributor), Karen Bassi (Contributor), Catherine Darbo-Peschanski (Contributor), Paolo Desideri (Contributor), Emily Greenwood (Contributor)13 more, Jonas Grethlein (Contributor), Antonis Liakos (Contributor), Nikos Miltsios (Contributor), Oswyn Murray (Contributor), Dennis Pausch (Contributor), Christopher Pelling (Contributor), Luke Pitcher (Contributor), Tim Rood (Contributor), Melina Tamiolaki (Contributor), Antonis Tsakmakis (Contributor), Aviezer Tucker (Contributor), Katharina Wesselmann (Contributor), Nicolas Wiater (Contributor)

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From the early modern period, Greek historiography has been studied in the context of Cicero's notion historia magistra vitae and considered to exclude conceptions of the future as different from the present and past. Comparisons with the Roman, Judeo-Christian and modern historiography have sought to justify this perspective by drawing on a category of the future as a temporal mode that breaks with the present. In this volume, distinguished classicists and historians challenge this contention by raising the question of what the future was and meant in antiquity by offering fresh considerations of prognostic and anticipatory voices in Greek historiography from Herodotus to Appian and by tracing the roots of established views on historical time in the opposition between antiquity and modernity. They look both at contemporary scholarly argument and the writings of Greek historians in order to explore the relation of time, especially the future, to an idea of the historical that is formulated in the plural and is always in motion. By reflecting on the prognostic of historical time the volume will be of interest not only to classical scholars, but to all who are interested in the history and theory of historical time.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lianeri, AlexandraEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baragwanath, EmilyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bassi, KarenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Darbo-Peschanski, CatherineContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Desideri, PaoloContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Greenwood, EmilyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Grethlein, JonasContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Liakos, AntonisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Miltsios, NikosContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Murray, OswynContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pausch, DennisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pelling, ChristopherContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pitcher, LukeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rood, TimContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tamiolaki, MelinaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tsakmakis, AntonisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tucker, AviezerContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wesselmann, KatharinaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wiater, NicolasContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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From the early modern period, Greek historiography has been studied in the context of Cicero's notion historia magistra vitae and considered to exclude conceptions of the future as different from the present and past. Comparisons with the Roman, Judeo-Christian and modern historiography have sought to justify this perspective by drawing on a category of the future as a temporal mode that breaks with the present. In this volume, distinguished classicists and historians challenge this contention by raising the question of what the future was and meant in antiquity by offering fresh considerations of prognostic and anticipatory voices in Greek historiography from Herodotus to Appian and by tracing the roots of established views on historical time in the opposition between antiquity and modernity. They look both at contemporary scholarly argument and the writings of Greek historians in order to explore the relation of time, especially the future, to an idea of the historical that is formulated in the plural and is always in motion. By reflecting on the prognostic of historical time the volume will be of interest not only to classical scholars, but to all who are interested in the history and theory of historical time.

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