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Blue Mars

by Kim Stanley Robinson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Mars Trilogy (3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
4,356482,248 (3.9)197
The red planet is red no longer, as Mars has become a perfectly inhabitable world. But while Mars flourishes, Earth is threatened by overpopulation and ecological disaster. Soon people look to Mars as a refuge, initiating a possible interplanetary conflict, as well as political strife between the Reds, who wish to preserve the planet in its desert state, and the Green "terraformers". The ultimate fate of Earth, as well as the possibility of new explorations into the solar system, stand in the balance.… (more)
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» See also 197 mentions

English (44)  French (2)  Spanish (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (48)
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
I guess this is intended to wrap things up somehow. I think it got a bit more evanescent than I can properly process. I think it was in Green Mars that we heard a lot about Nirgal's vision of green and white, some kind of alchemical fusion thing. Here it's more green and red, Sax and Ann. I can get with that a bit. I am preoccupied with philosophy of science. Science is surely some kind of disciplined engagement with the world. The most basic polarity would be perception and action. Ann would be the passive perceptive appreciative pole; Sax is the active controlling creative pole. But these two poles can't work in isolation, they have to marry. Well, get in bed together anyway!

So maybe that does wrap the whole trilogy up, tie together the major themes and tensions. ( )
  kukulaj | May 10, 2022 |
8
  revirier | Dec 13, 2021 |
Same as Green Mars. The three are really one looong epic. ( )
  dualmon | Nov 17, 2021 |
I find it amusing that ~20 years after having read this trilogy, I remembered all the parts about terraforming, and the longevity treatment, and the memory issues, even the freaking birdsuits, but nothing about the politics. On re-reading, I'd say the political aspect was the most interesting this time around. Probably because I'm older, and things are kinda forked up in the US right now, so that's of interest.

Some aspects of this trilogy are just products of the 90's. If this book had been written 10-15 years later, they would have been harvesting graphene instead of buckyballs. In fact, probably all of Mars would have been built with graphene. 🤣 Things like faxes, and people still call each other, and there's clearly no Internet. OK those I can understand because I lived in the 90s and remember life before the Internet. But what I don't buy is people taking drugs (omegendorph, pandorph, whippits) like there's no tomorrow and apparently never suffer addiction or side effects. 🤷🏻‍♀️

Things I didn't love about the triology this time around:
- Maya and Jackie. Why in the 22nd century are strong women still pitting against each other and calling each other sluts? Come on.
- Nadia saying she doesn't want kids, and the next page has a daughter. This is the same mentality that has annoying men constantly telling me I'm going to "change my mind" about not having kids. If a woman doesn't want to have kids, let's let her not have kids OK? Can't we have that in our utopian future?
- Speaking of having kids. This whole book is all about the one child policy, and clearly has no idea how repressive that is for women. Can we solve the problems of the hypermalthusian age without resorting to legislating people's bodies?
- Sax and Ann. The whole thing. He basically stalks her for 200 years, and wants her to absolve him of his sins. And then she does? He forces a medical treatment on her against her will, and doesn't leave her alone? That's just gross.
- I wish we could have spent more time thinking about the EPIC amounts of ennui that kids who grow up in a utopia and can expect to live basically forever are going to have. I think this was sort of hinted on with Zo but that didn't go very far. ( )
1 vote lemontwist | Oct 27, 2021 |
I finished it, but only because I was sort of interested in some of the characters, and I like to finish things - probably should have written this series off a few chapters into book two. I repeatedly skipped tens of pages of random descriptions of people looking at the world, and thinking about their lives, with a little political or economic nihilism / utopianism thrown in. Very few things actually happen, and characters don't even communicate that much.

The description of the development of futuristic technologies is also ... well, I would call it technobabble. I understand it is science fiction, and some of hand waving is always there - it's the future, we don't know about it yet. But no reason to spend dozens of pages describing the process of developing the next memory treatment, when we all know that it is imaginary.

( )
  jercox | Jun 2, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kim Stanley Robinsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Dixon, DonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Elson, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guarnieri, AnnaritaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, Jamie S. WarrenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Lisa and David and Timothy
First words
Mars is free now.
Quotations
"Better to die thinking that you're going to miss a golden age, than to go out thinking that you had taken down your children's chances with you. That you'd left your descendants with all kinds of toxic long-term debts. Now that would be depressing. As it is, we only have to feel bad for ourselves."
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The red planet is red no longer, as Mars has become a perfectly inhabitable world. But while Mars flourishes, Earth is threatened by overpopulation and ecological disaster. Soon people look to Mars as a refuge, initiating a possible interplanetary conflict, as well as political strife between the Reds, who wish to preserve the planet in its desert state, and the Green "terraformers". The ultimate fate of Earth, as well as the possibility of new explorations into the solar system, stand in the balance.

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Average: (3.9)
0.5 1
1 7
1.5
2 44
2.5 8
3 219
3.5 54
4 377
4.5 40
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