HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Another Brooklyn (2016)

by Jacqueline Woodson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0128314,992 (3.98)118
For August, running into a long-ago friend sets in motion resonant memories and transports her to a time and a place she thought she had mislaid: 1970s Brooklyn, where friendship was everything. August, Sylvia, Angela, and Gigi shared confidences as they ambled their neighborhood streets, a place where the girls believed that they were amazingly beautiful, brilliantly talented, with a future that belonged to them. But beneath the hopeful promise there was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place where grown men reached for innocent girls in dark hallways, where mothers disappeared, where fathers found religion, and where madness was a mere sunset away. Woodson heartbreakingly illuminates the formative period when a child meets adulthood -- when precious innocence meets the all-too-real perils of growing up. --… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 118 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
Woodson tells a complex story in many disconnected pieces. As far as creating character, mood, and image, she excels, though sometimes the plot is confusing and I felt like I was "missing" something several times. This is well-done, though I definitely like Brown Girl Dreaming better. 3.5 stars. ( )
  DrFuriosa | Dec 4, 2020 |

Another Brooklyn breathtaking.

A beautiful portrait of longing and memory that is as raw and sharp as it is true and tender. The rhythm of writing mirrors Brooklyn in a way that will have you finishing the pages before you are ready to let August and her story go. ( )
  ShannonRose4 | Sep 15, 2020 |

Another Brooklyn breathtaking.

A beautiful portrait of longing and memory that is as raw and sharp as it is true and tender. The rhythm of writing mirrors Brooklyn in a way that will have you finishing the pages before you are ready to let August and her story go. ( )
  ShannonRose4 | Sep 15, 2020 |
I'm now a Jacqueline Woodson devotee. It was great to read this right after Brown Girl Dreaming because of how wonderfully similar and different they are at the same time. Similar is Woodson's language, which even in prose is actually poetry. But this story is not a memoir, as she points out in the afterword. It holds pieces of her stories nevertheless.

The novel reads almost like a fever dream, the narrator herself seemingly confused about the passage of time. Memories and snippets collected in a web of thought.

This book stays with me, making me think, as the best books do: Our memories shape us, but how do we know which memories are true? And memories that are true for one might be remembered differently for another. Time erases and reveals truths as we stumble towards our destinies.
"Two steps to the left or right or front or back and you're standing outside your life."

This book is a beautiful homage to the innocence of childhood, the slippery slope into adulthood and the people we become when all is said and done.
( )
  Punkerfairy | Jul 12, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 83 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Woodson, Jacquelineprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Miles, RobinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Keep straight down this block, Then turn right where you will find A peach tree blooming. --RICHARD WRIGHT
Dedication
For Bushwick (1970--1990) In Memory
First words
For a long time, my mother wasn't dead yet.
Quotations
For God so loved the world, their father would say, he gave his only begotten son. But what about the daughters, I wondered. What did God do with his daughters?
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

For August, running into a long-ago friend sets in motion resonant memories and transports her to a time and a place she thought she had mislaid: 1970s Brooklyn, where friendship was everything. August, Sylvia, Angela, and Gigi shared confidences as they ambled their neighborhood streets, a place where the girls believed that they were amazingly beautiful, brilliantly talented, with a future that belonged to them. But beneath the hopeful promise there was another Brooklyn, a dangerous place where grown men reached for innocent girls in dark hallways, where mothers disappeared, where fathers found religion, and where madness was a mere sunset away. Woodson heartbreakingly illuminates the formative period when a child meets adulthood -- when precious innocence meets the all-too-real perils of growing up. --

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.98)
0.5 1
1
1.5
2 9
2.5 5
3 49
3.5 23
4 136
4.5 31
5 66

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 157,994,489 books! | Top bar: Always visible