HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Foundation and Earth by Isaac Asimov
Loading...

Foundation and Earth (original 1986; edition 2004)

by Isaac Asimov

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
7,042631,029 (3.78)1 / 45
The fifth novel in Asimov''s popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man''s fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia.… (more)
Member:KnightElite
Title:Foundation and Earth
Authors:Isaac Asimov
Info:Spectra (2004), Mass Market Paperback, 528 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work Information

Foundation and Earth by Isaac Asimov (1986)

Recently added byPBlaylock, MikeGun, EthanLiu, private library, 9alecj, Samuel.Lutwidge, cdcameron
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

» See also 45 mentions

English (52)  French (5)  Italian (3)  Hungarian (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (62)
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
This was, chronologically, the last of Asimov's Foundation series. Golam Trevize and Janov Pelorat embark on a search for the legendary original home planet of humanity, which Trevize believes may be linked to the crucial decision he has made in Foundation's Edge that will profoundly affect the future of the galaxy. I love the quest nature of this novel which is probably my favourite Foundation novel in terms of a story. It also deals with profound issues such as personal freedom vs. collaborative action and behaviour , and the nature of myths and legends and their relationship with recorded history. A great end to the saga. ( )
1 vote john257hopper | Nov 6, 2021 |
Welp. Thank god this is the last Asimov-written Foundation series novel I had to read. What a steaming, stinking mess. It smelled like a my-publisher-wanted-a-new-Foundation-novel-and-all-I-had-was-this-short-story-idea kind of thing.

Asimov essentially mixed up [b:The Wonderful Wizard of Oz|236093|The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (Oz, #1)|L. Frank Baum|http://images.gr-assets.com/books/1398003737s/236093.jpg|1993810], [b:Gulliver's Travels|7733|Gulliver's Travels|Jonathan Swift|http://images.gr-assets.com/books/1427829692s/7733.jpg|2394716], and [b:Goldilocks & the Three Bears|1177268|Goldilocks & the Three Bears|Nicola Baxter|http://images.gr-assets.com/books/1356471932s/1177268.jpg|1165063], extracted all the magic of those stories, threw it away, threw in some really bad sex, and then folded in over-explanatory dialogue that sounds like it was written by a precociously intelligent 12-year-old future scientist/politician.

Only someone who had published a SF series as huge as the original Foundation trilogy would be able to slide this crap past any self-respecting editor and out to a printing press. This really shouldn't have ever seen the light of day.

There were so many so-bad-I've-got-to-laugh-or-I'll-cry moments in this novel. How many times did he write argument for and against Gaia? How many times did he compare all of Gaia to a human body? How many times did he explain things that simply didn't need explaining (Intelligent life under water can't advance technology, because technology is fire-based. You can't have fire underwater. ...well, no shit, Sherlock)? How often would the merry band land somewhere, meet a single person, ask them--the first person they've met on the entire planet--where Earth is, the person wouldn't know, and they'd despair that no one on the entire planet knows? How often did they go somewhere and meet precisely the right person to give them the next clue or puzzle piece?

Then there's the singular stupidities such as, near the end of the book, the merry band is so excited to be where they are that they don't check the atmosphere of the world they're on to see if it's breathable before they exit the ship. Asimov makes a point of this, then tosses it off with an "oh well, lucky for them, it was totally okay" sort of line.

I will give Asimov full credit for his imagination, for his ability to world-build and universe build. But this is one massively popular author who was, when it came to nuance, finesse, characterization, dialogue, and, at times, plot, absolutely awful.

The only reason I'm continuing with the last three Foundation novels I have in this series is because none of them are written by Asimov. Because if it wasn't for that, this particular entry in the series would be my line in the sand.

What a steaming pile of shit. ( )
  TobinElliott | Sep 3, 2021 |
Wow. ( )
  isente | Jan 6, 2021 |
This is the second sequel to the original Foundation trilogy:

1988 Prelude to Foundation
1993 Forward the Foundation
1951 Foundation
1952 Foundation and Empire
1953 Second Foundation
1981 Foundation's Edge
1986 Foundation and Earth ( )
  RFBrost | Jul 8, 2020 |
The hunt is on for planet Earth. Former Councilman of the First Foundation Golan Revize sets out with historian Janov Pelorate and a woman named Bliss. It is centuries after the fall of the First Galactic Empire and the future of humankind lies in the ability to form a new empire. But where? Golan is convinced neither the First Foundation nor the Second are stable enough for success. Instead, he hangs his hope on using Gaia. Before that can happen he must find Earth, the planet that has been lost for thousands of years. It is not going to be easy. In some cultures of the galaxy, it is a superstition to utter the word, 'Earth." One must say 'the Oldest' instead.
Interestingly enough, even though Bliss is a friend and a helper, she is without paperwork, and she is not part of the travel log. As a result, problems regarding immigration arise. She is seen as "entertainment" for the two men who are the only ones accounted for on the spaceship.
Foundation and Earth is heavy with philosophical questions like, is a toe tapping in time to music part of the action, acting as an in-time accompanying drum beat or a response to the action of music being played? ( )
  SeriousGrace | Sep 30, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 52 (next | show all)
Mr. Asimov has failed to integrate the necessary background into the current action in a way that can make sense to a new reader (as he did so deftly in ''Foundation's Edge'' and ''Robots and Empire''). Worse, he is too busy referring the reader to positions staked out in the earlier books to create fresh sources of dramatic tension. In his younger days, when he chronicled the decline and fall of the Galactic Empire through plots borrowed from Roman history, he tagged his narratives with playful quotations from the ''Encyclopedia Galactica.'' Now he seems to be treating his own corpus of work as the stuff of history. His characters are so conscious of their awesome responsibilities that they lack spontaneity. As eager as I am to know what Mr. Asimov has in store for the galaxy, I hope that he continues this project out of real conviction and not merely from habit or a sense of obligation. I would prefer a few loose ends to a series of backward-looking sequels.
 
Does the Foundation series really end here? Near the end of the novel, we are given a clue to what may be yet to come. An idiosyncrasy of Asimov's Foundation/Robot universe has always been that mankind has expanded into an empty and almost lifeless galaxy with no intelligent aliens, a galaxy where men and the robots are the only intelligent life forms. Now we receive a hint that there may be intelligent alien life in other galaxies and that mankind and these aliens may be destined to meet. Isaac Asimov is an amazingly prolific writer, and he has been well rewarded for his recent efforts. I would not want to bet that "Foundation and Earth" is really the conclusion of the Foundation series.
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isaac Asimovprimary authorall editionscalculated
Anselmi, PieroTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Chiconi, OscarCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dumont, StéphaneCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Markkula, PekkaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wallerstein, AlanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whelan, MichaelCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
White, TimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To the memory of Judy-Lynn Del Rey
(1943-1986), a giant in mind and spirit.
First words
'Why did I do it?' asked Golan Trevize.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

The fifth novel in Asimov''s popular Foundation series opens with second thoughts. Councilman Golan Trevize is wondering if he was right to choose a collective mind as the best possible future for humanity over the anarchy of contentious individuals, nations and planets. To test his conclusion, he decides he must know the past and goes in search of legendary Earth, all references to which have been erased from galactic libraries. The societies encountered along the way become arguing points in a book-long colloquy about man''s fate, conducted by Trevize and traveling companion Bliss, who is part of the first world/mind, Gaia.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Hardcover 9 1/2x6 1/2x1 1/4 356 pp. Copyright 1986 Doubleday, Nightfall Inc.
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.78)
0.5 1
1 17
1.5 7
2 99
2.5 25
3 337
3.5 69
4 501
4.5 35
5 341

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,618,661 books! | Top bar: Always visible