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The Girl Who Played with Fire (2006)

by Stieg Larsson

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Millennium Trilogie (2), Millennium Trilogy (2), Millennium (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
26,62087583 (4.12)1 / 788
On the eve of publisher Mikael Blomkvist's story about sex trafficking between Eastern Europe and Sweden, two investigating reporters are murdered. And even more shocking for Mikael Blomkvist: the fingerprints found on the murder weapon belong to Lisbeth Salander--the troubled, wise-beyond-her-years genius hacker who came to his aid years before.… (more)
Recently added byRennie80, private library, AlanaMorego, OliviaNash, JoeB1934, multiplexer, reginaclark, Dieseldogz
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» See also 788 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 781 (next | show all)
"The Girl who Played with Fire" has middle book of a trilogy syndrome. It doesn't have all the setup and introductions and background and exploration of character that the first book has and it doesn't have the resolution of a final book. It is the Empire Strikes Back of the Millennium Trilogy --- neither an opener nor a closer, but with plenty of "I am your father, Luke" moments. This leaves the book feeling a little bit at loose ends.

My biggest issue with "The Girl who Played with Fire" is that nothing of plot consequence happens for the first full third of the book. It opens with a big "meanwhile" where Lisbeth Salandar does stuff for a while and Mikhael Blomqvist does stuff for a while and the magazine does stuff for a while and really, people do stuff for a while. There's some good old fashioned lesbian sex, some regular straight sex, and lots of people sitting around drinking and talking. Then people get shot up real good and blood splatters and the book becomes enjoyable. We demand blood splatters! Give us dead bodies or go home!

The book tosses in characters who are so numerous it gets hard to follow after a while: cops, bikers, a professional boxer, the staff at Millennium magazine, the people at Milton Security, some dude named Zala, a big blond giant who goes around hitting people with his fists, government flunkies... and they all have names that end in "... berg." It becomes an exercise in being cross-eyed after a while. The story becomes /super/ exciting when it involves Lisbeth Salandar (our autistic heroine) or Mikael Blomqvist (our intrepid reporter) but then stalls a bit when it flashes to this secondary character or that secondary character. Well, I guess those characters need to have lives, too. Then there are fights --- one thing I can say about Stieg Larsson books is the guy knew how to write an exciting fight scene --- and implacable villains who are implacable and villainous and an absolutely amazing final 10% of the book full of, to put it bluntly, Empire Strikes Back moments with Big! Gasping! Revelations! GASP! Read that passage again! GASP!!!!

Except Lisbeth Salander gets to keep her hand. Sort of.

For the final 10% I bumped my review from three stars to four simply because the payoff is worth the slog at the beginning. For the most part, "The Girl who Played with Fire" is a three and a half star book. It plods in the beginning and bogs in places where the cops run around coming to incorrect conclusions. It is not as tightly plotted or as cleanly written as "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo." It isn't as enjoyably trashy, either -- sure, it has a lesbian sex scene but it is a bit on the tame side and Blomqvist doesn't sleep with /everyone/. It is trashy, sure, but it is not quite as trashy as the first book. In places it even feels a little conservative. The closing scenes, though, are worth the price of admission.

It also has no resolution. It's a middle series book. No opening and no closing. Luckily one can get "the Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest" from Amazon and it downloads right to the Kindle... ( )
  multiplexer | Jun 20, 2021 |
Now while the little review on the front of the book claimed that it was "a rare sequel that was even better than its predecessor"... well I have to agree to disagree (not that I take those "reviews" seriously anyway).

This book has a lot of the same flaws that the first part of the Millennium trilogy had that could all be labeled under the lack of an editor (or the lack of a proper one?). As pointed out in a lot of the other reviews, we see Lisbeth shopping for furniture in too excessive detail, we read about her plastic surgery and her trip to some island where she rescues a damsel in distress and... reads a book about maths. Mind you, this has little to no relevance to the plot. The IKEA couch doesn't come to her rescue, nor does Pythagoras. Oh, and of course we see the return of everyone's beloved coffee and sandwiches, because... apparently... that's... all that Swedish people eat...
Man, this book creates stereotypes!

Although, while the actual plot of the book could have started a bit earlier than page 200/600, I still found the book to be a page turner from the very start. Maybe it was just a welcomed change from all the YA I've been reading, but I really found myself immersed into the story and I am definitely going to pick up the third part whenever I have some spare cash.

All in all, if you read the first part and liked it, read this one as well. It's hardly the literary miracle that everyone thinks it is, but it's a nice read for those rainy days when you want a good murder mystery and a hot cup of tea. ( )
  C0r4a | May 25, 2021 |
A whole new adventure for Blomkvist & Lisbeth. Very entertaining story taking on a whole different storyline from the first book. This book builds on events mentioned in the first with respect to "all the evil". Definitely a great read, much easier to get into than the first book. ( )
  sjh4255 | May 4, 2021 |
Better than the first novel, but clearly a middle novel, not particularly a stand alone novel. ( )
  curious_squid | Apr 5, 2021 |
Great. Definitely a page turner. Great characters. ( )
  purple_pisces22 | Mar 14, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 781 (next | show all)
When a novel moves or affects me deeply, I think about it when I’m walking around. I don’t find myself thinking about The Girl Who Played With Fire, but while I was reading it, I was useless until I got to the end. In retrospect, my experience of the book, like it’s characters, seems unreal. As, of course, it was.
 
When Larsson gets down to the business of telling a story, he tells a nerve-tingling tale.
 
For all the complications of the melodramatic story, which advances at a brisk, violently cinematic clip in Reg Keeland’s translation, it’s clear where Larsson’s strongest interests lie — in his heroine and the ill-concealed attitudes she brings out in men.
 
Mr. Larsson’s two central characters, Salander and Blomkvist, transcend their genre and insinuate themselves in the reader’s mind through their oddball individuality, their professional competence and, surprisingly, their emotional vulnerability.
 
Lisbeth Salander se ha tomado un tiempo: necesita apartarse del foco de atención y salir de Estocolmo. Trata de seguir una férrea disciplina y no contestar a las llamadas y mensajes de un Mikael que no entiende por qué ha desaparecido de su vida sin dar ningún tipo de explicación. Las heridas del amor las cura Lisbeth en soledad, aunque intente despistar el desencanto con el estudio de las matemáticas y ciertos felices placeres en una playa del Caribe. ¿Y Mikael? El gran héroe, el súper Blomkvist, vive buenos momentos en Millennium, con las finanzas de la revista saneadas y reconocimiento profesional de colegas y medios. Ahora tiene entre manos un reportaje apasionante que le propone una pareja, Dag y Mia, sobre el tráfico y prostitución de mujeres provenientes del Este. Las vidas de nuestros dos protagonistas parecen haberse separado por completo, y mientras... una muchacha, atada a una cama soporta un día y otro día las horribles visitas de un ser despreciable, y sin decir una palabra, sueña con una cerilla y un bidón de gasolina, con la forma de provocar el fuego que acabe con todo.
added by Pakoniet | editLecturalia
 

» Add other authors (87 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Larsson, Stiegprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bjørnson, ElisabethTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giorgetti Cima, CarmenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gouvenain, Marc deTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grumbach, LenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Haidarová, AzitaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keeland, RegTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuhn, WibkeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kyrö, MarjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lexell, MartínTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ortega Román, Juan JoséTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reichlin, SaulReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sekov, TorbenNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Torma PéterTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Varotto, FrancescaEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vilardell, AlbertTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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She lay on her back fastened by leather straps to a narrow bed with a steel frame.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (1)

On the eve of publisher Mikael Blomkvist's story about sex trafficking between Eastern Europe and Sweden, two investigating reporters are murdered. And even more shocking for Mikael Blomkvist: the fingerprints found on the murder weapon belong to Lisbeth Salander--the troubled, wise-beyond-her-years genius hacker who came to his aid years before.

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Book description
Lisbeth Salander is wanted for a triple murder. All three victims are connected to a trafficking exposé about to be published in Mikael Blomqvist’s magazine Millenium, and Lisbeth’s fingerprints are on the weapon.
Lisbeth vanishes to avoid capture by the justice. Mikael, not believing the police, is despairingly trying to clear her name, using all his resources and the staff of his magazine. During this process, Mikael discovers Lisbeth’s past, a terrible story of abuse and traumatizing experiences growing up in the Swedish care system.

When he eventually finds her, it’s only to discover that she is far more entangled in his initial investigation of the sex industry than he could ever imagine.

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