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The First Men in the Moon (Penguin Classics)…
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The First Men in the Moon (Penguin Classics) (original 1901; edition 2005)

by H. G. Wells (Author)

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2,498446,068 (3.6)97
Classic Literature. Fiction. Science Fiction. HTML:

H. G. Wells' 1901 science fiction novel The First Men in the Moon tells the story of a voyage to the moon by Mr. Bedford, a businessman plagued by financial problems, and Dr. Cavor, a brilliant and somewhat eccentric scientist. On arrival they discover that the moon is already inhabited by an advanced underground civilization of insect-like beings who they call "Selenites". This forward-looking novel, critical of the imperialism of Wells' time, looks at the clash of civilizations and suggests a reflection of how humanity might develop in the future.

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Member:RoanClay
Title:The First Men in the Moon (Penguin Classics)
Authors:H. G. Wells (Author)
Info:Penguin Classics (2005), Edition: Reprint, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
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The First Men in the Moon by H. G. Wells (1901)

  1. 20
    A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: Two early 20th century works of speculation on extraterrestrial life from two of the great unfettered imaginations of English-language literature.
  2. 10
    Out of the Silent Planet by C. S. Lewis (Cecrow)
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» See also 97 mentions

English (41)  Spanish (1)  Swedish (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (44)
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
As with almost all fiction, science or otherwise, I find myself unsatisfied with the ending. Also, it left me wondering, without checking publication dates, who influenced who with the Grand Lunar/ Wizard of Oz caricature: Wells, Baum or Langley. I actually know the answer to that, but I did dwell upon it for a while. ( )
  gmillar | Mar 12, 2024 |
7/10 Have always loved HG Wells' writing and liked this book all the way through. The strongest part is probably the unusual ending: It takes a sharp turn and is filled with interesting detail.
Looking forward to more of the same. ( )
  MXMLLN | Jan 12, 2024 |
Hmm... quite weak for Wells I think. An interesting (if not now void) concept concerning life within the Earth's Moon. I enjoyed it quite thoroughly at first, but it drags out for 203 pages what could have been wrapped up nicely in 120. There isn't much story, and the events that happen are few and unvaried. The book itself technically finishes after around 160 pages, but then the narrator resumes his writing in order to add in some more closing details. I like how Wells imagines the moon as a snowy wasteland, dead and freezing at night and luminous and rich with alien vegetation in the day. The moon beings (selenites) I didn't find to be particularly interesting and the most we really experience of them are the some bug-like lunar cowboys and cattle. I guess it didn't help too much that I read Out of the Silent Planet by C.S. Lewis first, in which there is contained a spoiler - thanks, Lewis. Ah well, First Men in the Moon is certainly worth a read nonetheless, especially if you're a Wells fan (guilty). Though be warned, it is not without its “tumults". ( )
  TheScribblingMan | Jul 29, 2023 |
This book was difficult to finish. The first section on earth is fantastic and interesting. From the moment they reach the moon the book gets weighed down with over long observations and explanations that suffocate the story. ( )
  pigeonjim | Jul 26, 2023 |
While i admit 'War of the Worlds' is probably Well's best. This is my favorite of his stories that i've read so far. The only downside is that after what seems like a fitting climax there are still a few chapters to go. But if i just keep thinking 'Epilogue' in my head i can still enjoy them :) . ( )
  wreade1872 | Nov 28, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Wells, H. G.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ó Griobhtha, MícheálTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cinti, DecioTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Clarke, Arthur C.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davray, Henry-D.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Eggleton, BobCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibb, KateCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grünau, Werner vonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Guin, Ursula K. LeIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lake, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ley, WillyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lowndes, Robert A.W.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maële, Martin vanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McLean, StevenNotessecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mieville, ChinaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mikes, LajosTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parrinder, PatrickIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tiszay, AndorAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wells, FrankIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winters, HowardCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zitzewitz, Hoot vonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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As I sit down to write here amidst the shadows of vineleaves under the blue sky of southern Italy it comes to me with a certain quality of astonishment that my participation in these amazing adventures of Mr. Cavor was, after all, the outcome of the purest accident.
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So utterly at variance is destiny with all the little plans of men.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This is the main work for The First Men in the Moon by H. G. Wells. It should not be combined with any abridgement, adaptation, omnibus containing additional works, etc.
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Classic Literature. Fiction. Science Fiction. HTML:

H. G. Wells' 1901 science fiction novel The First Men in the Moon tells the story of a voyage to the moon by Mr. Bedford, a businessman plagued by financial problems, and Dr. Cavor, a brilliant and somewhat eccentric scientist. On arrival they discover that the moon is already inhabited by an advanced underground civilization of insect-like beings who they call "Selenites". This forward-looking novel, critical of the imperialism of Wells' time, looks at the clash of civilizations and suggests a reflection of how humanity might develop in the future.

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