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The Running Hare: The Secret Life of…
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The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland (edition 2017)

by John Lewis-Stempel (Author)

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514329,546 (4.14)1
Member:mullendore
Title:The Running Hare: The Secret Life of Farmland
Authors:John Lewis-Stempel (Author)
Info:TW Adult (2017) Black Swan edn
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:Rural, Herefordshire, Wildlife, Farmland, Sustainability, Folklore Rural, Wild flowers, Hares

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The Running Hare: The secret life of farmland by John Lewis-Stempel

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Showing 4 of 4
A very easy read but that is a positive. ( )
  adrianburke | May 6, 2018 |
A complex ode to a way of farming that according to the author is now dying out. Certainly a very literate and reflective man, his use of literary illustrations to magnify his musings on the natural world both entertains and perplexes at times. I enjoyed large tracts of this but sections I found hard going. Whilst not inaccessible, it can be almost that in places. I found tables of data from the DEFRA archives on dropping bird populations interesting but this isn't going to be to every non ecological warriors tastes. Interesting in places but I'm not sure if I'd read more by him. I say this as a person interested and concerned about environmentalism, food sourcing, etc. ( )
  aadyer | Mar 25, 2018 |
This was the first John Lewis-Stempel book i have read having picked it up on impulse from my library. I loved the idea of what he wanted to achieve with returning to a more natural way of growing wheat and the book had wonderful descriptions of the field and life or lack of around it, but I did find he went of subject a bit too much, especially with the peotry segments.
If you are lover of nature and poetry then i would recommend given this book a whirl ( )
  Silverlily26 | Jul 26, 2017 |
A paean to agricultural practices long since discarded in search of ever greater efficiency and yields, which have had the side-effect of destroying large swathes of British flora and fauna. The author acquires a field in Herefordshire with which to experiment with these old practices and sees the return of much flora and fauna without sacrificing crop quality and yields as much as nay-sayers predicted. A unique writing style not to everyone's taste perhaps, but a fascinating insight into what modern agriculture has lost. ( )
  edwardsgt | Jun 25, 2016 |
Showing 4 of 4
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The running hare is natural history close up and personal. It is the closely observed study of the plants and animals that live in and under plough land, from the labouring microbes to the patrolling kestrel above the corn, of field mice in nests woven to crop steams, and the hare now running for his life. It is a history of the field, which is really the story of our landscape and us, a people for whom the plough has informed every part of life: our language and religion, our holidays and our food. And it is the story of a field, once moribund and now transformed.… (more)

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