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Ancestors: A Family History by William…
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Ancestors: A Family History (edition 1995)

by William Maxwell (Author)

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1331166,297 (4.03)3
The National Book Award-winning author of So Long, See You Tomorrow offers an astonishing evocation of a vanished world, as he retraces, branch by branch, the history of his family, taking readers into the lives of settlers, itinerant preachers, and small businessmen, examining the way they saw their world and how they imagined the world to come.… (more)
Member:MissKito
Title:Ancestors: A Family History
Authors:William Maxwell (Author)
Info:Vintage (1995), Edition: Reprint, 320 pages
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Ancestors: A Family History by William Maxwell

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William Maxwell was born in 1908 in Lincoln, Illinois. When he was fourteen, his father, an insurance executive, moved the family to Chicago. My grandrather James Lyle McCormick was born in the same county of Illinois in 1898. Like Maxwell, his mother also died when he was young, and his father, also an insurance executive, also moved the family to Chicago where James went to high school in the Austin neighborhood and attended the University of Chicago after serving in WWI. Maxwell's family attended the Christian Church as did the family of James Lyle McCormick's mother, the Housers. Maxwell is a talented writer and gives an account of his ancestry which closely parallels my own. Particularly he gives detailed accounts of the formation of the Christian Church by Barton Stone which took place hear the same place in Kentucky where our Morrows and Vaughans lived and within the same Washington presbytery where the Gillilands were members.

I'm sure his ancestor sand mine knew each other. The writing is beautiful and the feeling of the history is very similar to my own fatasy of how I would like to write a history of our family. ( )
  aprille | Dec 14, 2019 |
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The National Book Award-winning author of So Long, See You Tomorrow offers an astonishing evocation of a vanished world, as he retraces, branch by branch, the history of his family, taking readers into the lives of settlers, itinerant preachers, and small businessmen, examining the way they saw their world and how they imagined the world to come.

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