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Spook Street: Jackson Lamb Thriller 4 by…
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Spook Street: Jackson Lamb Thriller 4 (original 2017; edition 2017)

by Mick Herron (Author)

Series: Slough House (4)

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226886,483 (4.24)14
"What happens when an old spook starts to lose his mind? Do the Services have a retirement home for people who know too many secrets but don't remember they're secrets? Or does someone come to take care of the senile spy for good? These are the questions River Cartwright must ask himself as his grandfather--David Cartwright, a Cold War-era operative--starts to forget to wear pants, and starts believing everyone in his life is someone sent by Services to watch him. However, River has other things to worry about. A bomb goes off in the middle of a flash mob performance in a busy shopping center and kills forty innocent civilians. The agents of Slough House have to figure out who is behind this act of terror before the situation escalates"--… (more)
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Title:Spook Street: Jackson Lamb Thriller 4
Authors:Mick Herron (Author)
Info:John Murray (2017), Edition: 1st
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Spook Street by Mick Herron (Author) (2017)

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» See also 14 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
Let me start by saying that having now read the first four books in the Jackson Lamb/Slough House series, I think we can pretty well give up on any expectation that the plots are going to get any more realistic. That having been said, why read the books? Because the characters are, well, characters. Jackson Lamb himself, first of all. It’s taken me about a week to finish the first four books in this series, and I’m not saying it’s addictive, but … I will miss the misfits of Slough House while we wait for Mick Herron to write more books. ( )
  ericlee | Aug 12, 2019 |
The story lags at the beginning but it picks up as the suspense builds after the first third of the book. By the end it becomes a fast-paced chase thriller.
What is best about "Spook Street" is Jackson Lamb, the chief spook at Slough House and master of the slow horses. He holds the group together while being boorish and cynical about the Intelligence Establishment personified by the likes of Charles Whalen ("First Desk") and Diana Taverner ("Lady Di"). River Cartwright is a lead character who plays a ket role in the series up to now and probably into future books.
It is possible to read this book as a standalone spy thriller, but all of the books in the series are worthwhile reading. ( )
  BrianEWilliams | Aug 26, 2018 |
Brilliant. ( )
  thewriterswife | Mar 26, 2018 |
Thia is the fourth book in the Jackson Lamb series about failed spies in a quiet London office. This one was just as good as the other three I've read. The head of the office , Lamb, is still as foul and yet reliable as ever. River runs off to try and save the world. Catherine still wants a drink. Ho is still terrible at being a human being. These characters mixed with the aftwrmath of a terrible bombing and an increasingly confused elderly spy make for gripping reading. And also laughs.
When the taxi dropped them, they walked to Baker Street. Patrice still had the gun, though where he’d secreted it, River couldn’t tell. If down the back of his waistband, as River suspected, he must have spent hours practising how to walk, sit, move, without looking like his haemorrhoids were flaring. ( )
  charl08 | Feb 13, 2018 |
What happens to spies when they get old? This is the intriguing question posed by Spook Street. Former senior spy David Cartwright is showing the early signs of dementia. He wanders round his village in his pyjamas, convinced that the flickering streetlights are a code, and that the local shopkeeper’s small talk is an interrogation. What might he reveal in his confusion?

His grandson, River Cartwright, is one of the misfit spies exiled to Slough House under Jackson Lamb (the so-called Slow Horses). He is concerned about his grandfather and wants to take care of him before the Service move to ‘take care of him’ in another sense.

At first I found it hard to orient myself in the present day, particularly as this was my introduction to Slough House. I’m a big fan of John le Carré and I couldn’t shake the feeling that I was back in the world of Smiley. The grotty building, the sluggish central heating, the air of ennui, the animal terminology (stoats and horses rather than moles) – Even the cadence of the prose echoes le Carré. It’s only the references to technology that hurtle you back to the present day.

But this is more than Smiley with iPods. I soon warmed (if that’s the right word) to the Slow Horses. They are flawed but clever, unlikeable to varying degrees (likeability is, in my view, a much-overrated quality in a fictional character) but always interesting.

One way Spook Street differs from le Carré is that no one here seems to much believe in anything. In Smiley’s world, people are motivated at times by principle, even if they’re not the principles they’re supposed to have. Here the ambitious are motivated by their own power and status, while the employees at Slough House seem to have enough to do just to make it through the day.

A lot of contemporary spy fiction, and crime in general, seems to be high in concept and low in substance. Fast food for the eyeball, with clockwork characters marching through the obligatory twists. This is the opposite. The plot is the plot, and is probably best not examined too closely, but the prose is rich and satisfying and funny in the darkness and bleak in the light. There are complex, grown up characters and a world in Slough House that may owe a debt to le Carré but clearly has a life of its own. A world that lives and breathes and which you are sure is still there when you have stopped reading. I’ll definitely be back.
*
I received a copy of Spook Street from the publisher via Netgalley.
This review first appeared on my blog https://katevane.wordpress.com/ ( )
  KateVane | Jun 30, 2017 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Herron, MickAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Doyle, GerardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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"What happens when an old spook starts to lose his mind? Do the Services have a retirement home for people who know too many secrets but don't remember they're secrets? Or does someone come to take care of the senile spy for good? These are the questions River Cartwright must ask himself as his grandfather--David Cartwright, a Cold War-era operative--starts to forget to wear pants, and starts believing everyone in his life is someone sent by Services to watch him. However, River has other things to worry about. A bomb goes off in the middle of a flash mob performance in a busy shopping center and kills forty innocent civilians. The agents of Slough House have to figure out who is behind this act of terror before the situation escalates"--

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A shakeup at MI5 and a terrorist attack on British soil set in motion clandestine machinery known to few modern spies. David Cartwright isn’t a modern spy, however; he’s legend and a bonafide Cold War hero. He’s also in his dotage and losing his mind to Alzheimer’s. His stories of “stotes” hiding in the bushes, following his every move have been dismissed by friends and family for years. Cartwright may be losing track of reality but he’s certain about one thing: Old spooks don't go quietly and neither do the secrets they keep.

What happens when an old spook loses his mind? Does the Service have a retirement home for those who know too many secrets but don’t remember they’re secret? Or does someone take care of the senile spy for good? These are the questions River Cartwright must ask when his grandfather, a Cold War–era operative, starts to forget to wear pants and begins to suspect everyone in his life has been sent by the Home Office to watch him.

But River has other things to worry about. A bomb has detonated in the middle of a busy shopping center and killed forty innocent civilians. The agents of Slough House have to figure out who is behind this act of terror before the situation escalates. Amazon
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