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Agnès Varda: Cuba by Clément Chéroux
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Agnès Varda: Cuba (edition 2015)

by Clément Chéroux (Author), Agnès Varda (Photographer), Valérie Vignaux (Author)

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In December 1962, just two months after the missile crisis, Agn s Varda (born 1928) traveled to Cuba. Like many French intellectuals, she was fascinated by this island and its charismatic leader and wanted to make a film to understand this particular mix of pure socialism, sensuality and cha-cha-cha. In order to preserve her freedom of movement, she traded film for still photography, with the idea of subsequently filming and reanimating her photographs with a rostrum camera. Although they had not been devised as art photographs, the shots from Salut les cubains (1964), presented for the first time in this French-language-only book, are of exceptionally high quality, an example of unhindered street photography. We recognize the sharp but always warm-hearted style for which Varda is known, as well as the tension between still and animated images. Agnes Varda: Cuba also compiles Varda's archives--notebooks, sketches and editing notes--along with four illuminating essays. Please note that this title is in the French language only.… (more)
Member:vvignaux
Title:Agnès Varda: Cuba
Authors:Clément Chéroux (Author)
Other authors:Agnès Varda (Photographer), Valérie Vignaux (Author)
Info:Editions Xavier Barral (2015), Edition: Bilingual, 164 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:Cinéma militant

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Agnès Varda: Cuba by Clément Chéroux

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In December 1962, just two months after the missile crisis, Agn s Varda (born 1928) traveled to Cuba. Like many French intellectuals, she was fascinated by this island and its charismatic leader and wanted to make a film to understand this particular mix of pure socialism, sensuality and cha-cha-cha. In order to preserve her freedom of movement, she traded film for still photography, with the idea of subsequently filming and reanimating her photographs with a rostrum camera. Although they had not been devised as art photographs, the shots from Salut les cubains (1964), presented for the first time in this French-language-only book, are of exceptionally high quality, an example of unhindered street photography. We recognize the sharp but always warm-hearted style for which Varda is known, as well as the tension between still and animated images. Agnes Varda: Cuba also compiles Varda's archives--notebooks, sketches and editing notes--along with four illuminating essays. Please note that this title is in the French language only.

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