HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

How Everything Became War and the Military Became Everything: Tales from the Pentagon

by Rosa Brooks

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2354112,713 (3.94)5
The Pentagon's a strange place. Inside secure command centers, military officials make life and death decisions--but the Pentagon also offers food courts, banks, drugstores, florists, and chocolate shops. When Rosa Brooks gave her family a tour, her mother gaped at the glossy window displays: "So the heart of American military power is a shopping mall?" In a sense, yes: the U.S. military has become our one-stop-shopping solution to global problems. Today's military personnel analyze computer code, train Afghan judges, build Ebola isolation wards, eavesdrop on electronic communications, develop soap operas, and patrol the seas for pirates. Rosa Brooks traces this seismic shift in how America wages war from an unconventional perspective. She is a former top Pentagon official and the daughter of antiwar protesters; a human rights activist and the wife of an Army Special Forces officer. Her book is by turns a memoir, a work of journalism, and a scholarly exploration of history, anthropology, and law. But at its heart it is a rallying cry, for Brooks shows that when the war machine breaks out of its borders, we undermine the values and rules that keep our world from sliding toward chaos. And as we pile new tasks onto the military, we make it increasingly ill-prepared for the threats America faces. Brooks sounds an alarm, forcing us to see how the collapsing barriers between war and peace threaten both America and the world. And time is running out to make things right.--From dust jacket.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 4 of 4
Rosa Brooks knows how to explain complex social systems in ways even I can comprehend. ( )
  mykl-s | Jan 18, 2023 |
A model non-fiction blockbuster: well written, comprehensive, but with a clear argument. As the US government defunds almost everything other than the military, the military is required to take on jobs that it is poorly prepared to do. And as open ended wars on drugs, terror, black people etc etc... proliferate, there seems to be nothing and nobody immune from the military's attention. Well worth reading this back to back with Fred Jameson's essay on the army as offering a possible site of political resistance. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
This book explores complex and sometimes arcane issues in readable, clear prose. Brooks has worked all sides of the policy wonk street, civilian, military and non-government. She points out the strengths of our system as powerfully as she explores its flaws, and in so doing makes it clear that we need to address some fundamental aspects of our current situation that we have been avoiding. She nods at those who feel that terrorism should have been treated as a crime from 9/11 onward, rather than as a call to war, but she is very critical of those who think the structures that work to fight a classic army-to-army war on battlefields are adequate to address our current "war". Brooks makes an impassioned plea for us all to face reality and start trying to define the legal and political impacts of the war on terror upon our social, political and governmental structures. This is an important book! ( )
  nmele | Aug 30, 2017 |
We’re in a vicious dynamic in which cuts for domestic programs and the State Department lead the military to take on missions that go far beyond killing enemy soldiers, and then compared to the gutted civilian sector the military looks more competent/like a better bet. Plus we face significant legal questions about the meaning of endless war, both in terms of the treatment of individuals—when can they be targeted?—and state-to-state relations—when is intervention on another country’s territory justified? If we can go in because the state has failed to protect its own citizens, as in Rwanda or Bosnia, can we also go in because the state failed to protect others’ (as we did in Afghanistan and later with the raid that killed bin Laden in Pakistan)? Brooks explores these issues and others, including a lot about civilian-military disconnect, with few solutions but a lot of nuance. ( )
  rivkat | Apr 16, 2017 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

The Pentagon's a strange place. Inside secure command centers, military officials make life and death decisions--but the Pentagon also offers food courts, banks, drugstores, florists, and chocolate shops. When Rosa Brooks gave her family a tour, her mother gaped at the glossy window displays: "So the heart of American military power is a shopping mall?" In a sense, yes: the U.S. military has become our one-stop-shopping solution to global problems. Today's military personnel analyze computer code, train Afghan judges, build Ebola isolation wards, eavesdrop on electronic communications, develop soap operas, and patrol the seas for pirates. Rosa Brooks traces this seismic shift in how America wages war from an unconventional perspective. She is a former top Pentagon official and the daughter of antiwar protesters; a human rights activist and the wife of an Army Special Forces officer. Her book is by turns a memoir, a work of journalism, and a scholarly exploration of history, anthropology, and law. But at its heart it is a rallying cry, for Brooks shows that when the war machine breaks out of its borders, we undermine the values and rules that keep our world from sliding toward chaos. And as we pile new tasks onto the military, we make it increasingly ill-prepared for the threats America faces. Brooks sounds an alarm, forcing us to see how the collapsing barriers between war and peace threaten both America and the world. And time is running out to make things right.--From dust jacket.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (3.94)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 5
3.5 1
4 16
4.5 2
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 201,747,220 books! | Top bar: Always visible