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Snow Country (1935)

by Yasunari Kawabata

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,876733,930 (3.73)169
With the brushstroke suggestiveness and astonishing grasp of motive that won him the Nobel Prize for Literature, Yasunari Kawabata tells a story of wasted love set amid the desolate beauty of western Japan, the snowiest region on earth. It is there, at an isolated mountain hotspring, that the wealthy sophisticate Shimamura meets the geisha Komako, who gives herself to him without regrets, knowing that their passion cannot last. Shimamura is a dilettante of the feelings; Komako has staked her life on them. Their affair can have only one outcome. Yet, in chronicling its doomed course, one of Japan's greatest modern writers creates a novel dense in implication and exalting in its sadness.… (more)
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» See also 169 mentions

English (66)  French (4)  Dutch (2)  Catalan (1)  All languages (73)
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
溫泉地雪山的日常生活別有風情。很多情感是被寫景的場面帶起來的。主角們.....也許是身處年代和文化不同,三位主要角色的心情想法我都無法理解 :P ( )
  CathyChou | Mar 11, 2022 |
Kawabata crafted a book with remarkable depth and eloquence worthy of reading again. ( )
  LREnglishTeach | Jan 3, 2022 |
Kawabata crafted a book with remarkable depth and eloquence worthy of reading again. ( )
  LREnglishTeach | Jan 3, 2022 |
Read not long after Dandelions and I have to say I found Snow Country much more opaque. I could gather together the bones of the narrative but I think there was a wealth of subtlety I missed. Also, the symbology wasn't so easy to interpret, though I did find the nature writing quite beautiful. The theme of wasted lives touched on in the novel was moving but I didn't have strong feelings for the tragedy involved. Seeing as how this is considered one of his major works I feel my reading didn't do it justice but whether I will re-read in the hope of better appreciating it remains to be seen. ( )
  Kevinred | Apr 20, 2021 |
Isolated on the mountains, with snow covering all surfaces, Shimamura meets Komako, a humble geisha. They fall in love but it cannot last, and the separation becomes inevitable. A meditation on the fleeting nature of human feelings, exalting sadness. ( )
1 vote Marcos_Augusto | Feb 19, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
Snow Country is a work of beauty and strangeness, one of the most distinguished and moving Japanese novels to have appeared in this country.
added by GYKM | editNew York Herald Tribune
 

» Add other authors (12 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Yasunari Kawabataprimary authorall editionscalculated
Durán, CésarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gergely ÁgnesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kivimies, YrjöTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lamberti, LucaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nagae, Neide HissaeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ouwehand, C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ouwehand, C.Afterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Seidensticker, Edward G.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The train came out of the long tunnel into the snow country.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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With the brushstroke suggestiveness and astonishing grasp of motive that won him the Nobel Prize for Literature, Yasunari Kawabata tells a story of wasted love set amid the desolate beauty of western Japan, the snowiest region on earth. It is there, at an isolated mountain hotspring, that the wealthy sophisticate Shimamura meets the geisha Komako, who gives herself to him without regrets, knowing that their passion cannot last. Shimamura is a dilettante of the feelings; Komako has staked her life on them. Their affair can have only one outcome. Yet, in chronicling its doomed course, one of Japan's greatest modern writers creates a novel dense in implication and exalting in its sadness.

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Average: (3.73)
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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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