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The Inner Life of Animals: Love, Grief, and…
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The Inner Life of Animals: Love, Grief, and Compassion_Surprising… (edition 2017)

by Peter Wohlleben (Author)

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333760,527 (3.53)16
Presents a revelatory exploration of the diverse emotional intelligence of animals as demonstrated in stories about loving pigs, cheating magpies, scheming roosters, and rats who regret bad choices. "Through vivid stories of devoted pigs, two-timing magpies, and scheming roosters, The Inner Life of Animals weaves Peter Wohlleben's wealth of personal experience observing nature in forests and fields with the latest scientific research into how animals interact with the world. Horses feel shame, deer grieve, and goats discipline their kids. Ravens call their friends by name, rats regret bad choices, and butterflies choose the very best places for their children to grow up. Peter Wohlleben follows the hugely successful The Hidden Life of Trees with insightful stories into the emotions, thoughts, and intelligence of animals around us. Animals are different from us in amazing ways--and they are also much closer to us than we ever would have thought."--Dust jacket flap.… (more)
Member:DanParson
Title:The Inner Life of Animals: Love, Grief, and Compassion_Surprising Observations of a Hidden World
Authors:Peter Wohlleben (Author)
Info:Greystone Books (2017), Edition: First Edition, 272 pages
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The Inner Life of Animals: Love, Grief, and Compassion―Surprising Observations of a Hidden World by Peter Wohlleben

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» See also 16 mentions

English (5)  French (1)  German (1)  All languages (7)
Showing 5 of 5
Hatte mir ein wenig mehr davon versprochen. Kein schlechtes Buch, aber mehr eins für die Sorte Leute, die noch davon überzeugt werden müssen, dass Tiere tatsächlich sowohl über ein Seelenleben verfügen, als auch zu Gefühlen wie Freude, Trauer und Dankbarkeit fähig sind. Trotz allem wieder interessant, wenn auch mit der einen oder anderen Länge. ( )
  Heidi64 | Jul 18, 2021 |
Animals of all kinds have played a part in the human story from way back; they have been companions, used for work, providing and actually being the food in a lot of cases too. Whilst some have been cherished, lots have been treated as pure commodities and we have often been quite cruel usually because people thought that they were not capable of communicating or had emotions.

The latest scientific research and observations though is uncovering a very different story. Lots are known about dolphins and whales though we and not very far down the road of understanding what is being said, and it turns out there are a lot of other animals that communicate in one way or another but there is another world that is slowly being revealed. They have discovered instances of animals feeling shame, sadness, regret and as well as the way they can consciously select partners.

I really enjoyed Peter Wohlleben's first book, The Hidden Life Of Trees, a subject he knows a lot about having been a forester for around three decades, and the intimacy of his knowledge there shines like a blade of sunlight through the glade. With this, he is out of his comfort zone somewhat and even though he is drawing on personal experience and scientific research to highlight just how animals behave. Whilst it may have a grounding in science, this is primarily anecdotal evidence and also shows how we as humans project our not fully understood emotions and habits onto all sorts of different species. Still worth reading as some of the stories in here are quite entertaining. ( )
  PDCRead | Apr 6, 2020 |
As good as it is, and “The Inner Life of Animals” is very good, it could never top “The Hidden Life of Trees” by the same author, Peter Wohlleben. After all, once you’ve said that trees can feel pain, nurse their young and communicate with each other, there is not much shock value in saying animals are more intelligent than most people give them credit for.

Yet Wohlleben does provide plenty of surprises. Slime molds can find their way through a maze. Bees can remember people. Butterflies can detect the age of plants. Chickens dream. A horse’s whinny can mean different things depending on its pitch. Many animals, he says, have a sense of fairness.

Ornithologists have found shy tits have at least one advantage over more aggressive tits: They notice things their more extroverted, quickly-moving fellows do not, such as seeds left over from the previous summer. (It occurs to me that introverted humans also notice things missed by extroverts.)

Wohlleben manages a forest in Germany, so sensitivity to trees should come with the territory. But forests have a variety of animal life, and his family has owned numerous pets, as well as those goats shown on the cover of his book. So his own observations fill out the book, while the results of many scientific studies, as interpreted by the author, make up most of the text. And Wohlleben tends to interpret those findings in such a way that emphasizes an animal’s intelligence and sensitivity. Other people, such as those who hunt, fish or operate slaughterhouses, might interpret them differently, or more likely ignore them altogether. ( )
1 vote hardlyhardy | Jun 7, 2019 |
If you liked Trees you'll like Animals. It's basis is in scientific research which is much better presented in Carl Safina's wonderful Beyond Words, but this is still worth reading for the additional anecdotes and quality of writing and of course Wohlleben's character and humor. This is the fourth book on animal intelligence I've read recently and these two, Wohlleben and Safina, are the best IMO for a general reader. If you've already read Safina or some other book, this is still worthwhile it doesn't repeat the same stories, it's more personal and contemplative. ( )
1 vote Stbalbach | Jan 16, 2018 |
Tender, anecdotal accounting of the many ways we have arrogantly misunderstood and underestimated animals. ( )
  beaujoe | Oct 29, 2017 |
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» Add other authors (13 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Peter Wohllebenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Billinghurst, JaneTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Masson, Jeffrey MoussaieffForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Presents a revelatory exploration of the diverse emotional intelligence of animals as demonstrated in stories about loving pigs, cheating magpies, scheming roosters, and rats who regret bad choices. "Through vivid stories of devoted pigs, two-timing magpies, and scheming roosters, The Inner Life of Animals weaves Peter Wohlleben's wealth of personal experience observing nature in forests and fields with the latest scientific research into how animals interact with the world. Horses feel shame, deer grieve, and goats discipline their kids. Ravens call their friends by name, rats regret bad choices, and butterflies choose the very best places for their children to grow up. Peter Wohlleben follows the hugely successful The Hidden Life of Trees with insightful stories into the emotions, thoughts, and intelligence of animals around us. Animals are different from us in amazing ways--and they are also much closer to us than we ever would have thought."--Dust jacket flap.

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