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Celtic Tales: Fairy Tales and Stories of Enchantment from Ireland,…

by Kate Forrester (Illustrator)

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3021371,945 (4.21)3
The traditional stories of Ireland, Scotland, Brittany and Wales transport us to the fantastical world of Celtic folklore. Translated and transcribed by folklorists in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the 16 stories in this compilation conjure forgotten realms and rare magical creatures in vivid prose. These timeless tales brim with wit and magic, and each one is brought to life with elegant silhouette art by Kate Forrester in this special illustrated edition.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
‘’Do not think the fairies are always little.
Everything is capricious about them, even their size…
Their chief occupations are feasting, fighting, and making
love, and playing the most beautiful music.’’
William Butler Yeats, ‘’Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry’’

16 tales from Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Brittany. Tales of tricksters, witches and dragons. Of impossible quests, brave maidens, clever lads, wise women. Tales of love, wisdom, cunning plans and compassion. Tales of otherworldly creatures and very …worldly humans.

The Clumsy Beauty and Her Aunts (Ireland): A clumsy maiden attracts the attention of a prince and three wise women who knew how to work with fine flax come to her aid.

Μaster and Man (Ireland): The adventure of a brave young man and a member of the Fairy Folk.

The Kildare Pooka (Ireland): A very special pooka takes over the chores of the house.

Little White-Thorn and the Talking Bord (Brittany): A brave girl restores her mother’s position that had been compromised by her greedy brothers.

The Giant’s Stairs (Ireland): A brave blacksmith runs to the rescue of a very inquisitive boy.

The Witch of Fife (Scotland): In my favourite tale, a husband gets more than he had bargained for when he decides to follow his wife in one of her witchy-nightly escapades.

Assipatle and the Master Stoorworm (Scotland): An evil queen, a horrible wizard and a sea- monster threaten every maiden in the kingdom but they are no match for an intelligent young man.

The Seal Catcher and the Selkies (Scotland): You can’t create a Celtic Tales collection without including a story about selkies and this one is dreamy, whimsical and moving. A seal catcher finds himself in the domain of the selkies and understands the pain he inflicts.

The Soul Cages (Ireland): A story of the Old Folk and imprisoned souls.

The Basin of Gold and the Diamond Lance (Brittany): A tale of trials, riddles and treasures set in the beautiful city of Nantes.

The Brownie of Fern Glen (Scotland): Have we ever thought that the ‘’supernatural’’ creatures who have come to fear are actually afraid of humans and fed up with our silly behaviour? A kind brownie shows his gratitude to the woman who looks after him and exposes the humans for the dim-witted creatures they actually are…

The Red - Etin (Scotland): Three sons set off, seeking their fortune. Only one of them is brave and kind enough to overcome trials and giants and win the hand of the princess.

Teig O’Kane and the Corpse (Ireland): A young man who is all for drinking and merry-making with innocent girls understands that wandering in the night and making small talk with the spirits of the night isn’t really advisable…

The Witch of Lok Island (Brittany): A witch puts a spell on fickle suitors and lures them away from their beloved. A striking way to justify the inherent infidelity of men.

The Black Bull of Norroway (Scotland): Another beautiful, moving tale about a girl who had the immense courage to follow an enchanted bull and the unconditional love that helped her endure seven years of trials.

Meredydd and the Wyvern (Wales): Sometimes being in love means much more than killing a wyvern…A classic Welsh tale.

Beautifully adapted by Mirabelle Korn and outstandingly illustrated by Kate Forrester, Celtic Tales is an invaluable gem for your bookshelves.

‘’Seven long years I served for thee,
The glassy hill I climbed for thee,
The mantle white I washed for thee,
And wilt thou not waken and turn to me?’’

My reviews can also be found on https://theopinionatedreaderblog.wordpress.com/ ( )
  AmaliaGavea | Dec 8, 2021 |
A short collection of Celtic retellings. Beautifully illustrated, this collection of tales makes me want to seek out and read similar books that focus on other cultures fairy stories. ( )
  LynnK. | Aug 4, 2020 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This is a beautiful book with lovely and unique illustrations for each tale. It looks great on my bookshelf. The book is well made with thick pages and a ribbon to mark your page. I really like how the book was arranged (by type of tale/theme). The author has collected interesting stories that were new to me, although they were adapted from classic collections. They were the perfect length for reading to my kids before bed and keeping their interest.

I received this book from the Early Reviewers program in exchange for an honest review. ( )
  Cora-R | Feb 20, 2017 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
When I couldn't get back into reading after the election, I finally turned to Celtic Tales, a collection of "Fairy Tales and Stories of Enchantment from Ireland, Scotland, Brittany, and Wales". The unfamiliar stories and the beautiful artwork by Kate Forrester immediately drew me in. There's a great interview with the illustrator on the UK publisher's page about her inspiration, color choices, and more.

Looking at the pictures in this book, one is practically inspired to write their own tale. Each story has its own artwork and there's even a bookmark ribbon -- always the mark of a quality volume. Celtic Tales would be the perfect gift for kids or adults who love tricksters, heroes, and creatures.

http://webereading.com/2016/12/favorite-new-gift-books.html ( )
1 vote klpm | Dec 8, 2016 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Firstly, the picture does not do the book justice. The knots around the border and the title are raised to the touch. It just *feels* wonderful. Each tale inside has a corresponding picture featuring Forrester's lovely silhouette art. The stories themselves are adapted from 19th and early 20th century books of folklore, featuring tales from Ireland, Wales, Brittany, and Scotland.

The stories are ones I had never encountered before and are full of witches, fairies, sorcery, and magic. Protagonists make deals with brownies and defeat enchanted beasts. Some even learn a bit of humility along the way. These stories do not possess the darkness of the Grimm tales, and all have happy endings.

I had a lot of fun reading this book and admiring the artwork within. I'd recommend it to middle-grade students and above. ( )
1 vote Jessiqa | Nov 18, 2016 |
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Epigraph
Do not think the fairies are always little.
Everything is capricious about them, even their size. . . .
Their chief occupations are feasting, fighting, and making
love, and playing the most beautiful music.
--William Butler Yeats,
Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry
Dedication
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"The Clumsy Beauty and Her Aunts" -- There was once a poor widow with a daughter named Ursula, who was as beautiful as a spring day but as clumsy as could be.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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The traditional stories of Ireland, Scotland, Brittany and Wales transport us to the fantastical world of Celtic folklore. Translated and transcribed by folklorists in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the 16 stories in this compilation conjure forgotten realms and rare magical creatures in vivid prose. These timeless tales brim with wit and magic, and each one is brought to life with elegant silhouette art by Kate Forrester in this special illustrated edition.

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Book description
Contains the following stories:
"The Clumsy Beauty and Her Aunts"
"Master and Man"
"The Kildare Pooka"
"Little White-Thorn and the Talking Bird"
"The Giant's Stairs"
"The Witch of Fife"
"Assipattle and the Mester Stoorworm"
"The Seal Catcher and the Selkies"
"The Soul Cages"
"The Basin of Gold and the Diamond Lance"
"The Brownie of Fern Glen"
"The Red-Etin"
"Teig O'Kane and the Corpse"
"The Witch of Lok Island"
"The Black Bull of Norroway"
"Meredydd and the Wyvern"
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Kate Forrester's book Celtic Tales was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

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