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Out of Darkness by Russell Freedman
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Out of Darkness (original 1997; edition 1998)

by Russell Freedman (Author)

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726524,062 (3.78)1
A biography of the nineteenth-century Frenchman who, having been blinded himself at the age of three, went on to develop a system of raised dots on paper that enabled blind people to read and write.
Member:CarlsonLibrary
Title:Out of Darkness
Authors:Russell Freedman (Author)
Info:Scholastic Inc (1998), Edition: 1st Printing, 80 pages
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Out of Darkness: The Story of Louis Braille by Russell Freedman (1997)

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The biography of a 19th century blind Frenchman, Louis Braille, who developed a raised dot system for reading and writing.
  BLTSbraille | Sep 24, 2021 |
jB
  OakGrove-KFA | Mar 28, 2020 |
A simple, yet detailed account of one life who changed life for the blind for eternity makes for a great read. I absolutely love Freedman's writing style. He adds quite a bit of narration throughout the story, making history come to life. The drawings throughout the book go perfect with the content and have a soft undertone that reminds me of the French past.
  kdirks1 | Jun 9, 2012 |
Hazel Rochman (Booklist, March 1, 1997 (Vol. 93, No. 13))
More than 170 years ago, a blind French boy at age 15 invented a system of raised dots on paper that allows the sightless to read and write. Without melodrama, Freedman tells the momentous story in quiet chapters in his best plain style, making the facts immediate and personal. At age 3, Louis Braille was blinded in an accident with a knife. From the age of 12, he worked doggedly, sometimes secretly through the night at a special school in Paris, punching dots on paper, trying to develop a simple code for the alphabet that the blind could read with their fingertips. Woven into the story is an awareness of how the blind child experiences the world, what he remembers. Tension mounts as he refuses to be discouraged by technical and bureaucratic setbacks, until eventually he proves his system to his school and finally to the world. The handsome book design is clear and open. A diagram explains how the Braille alphabet works, and Kate Kessler's full-page shaded pencil illustrations are part of the understated poignant drama. But what about documentation? Is the opening chapter partially fictionalized? No sources are given for the facts and quotes throughout the book, and there's no bibliography. Category: Middle Readers. 1997, Clarion, $15.95. Gr. 4-8.

(No awards received, but was on several best books and reading lists) ( )
  JoannaT | May 30, 2007 |
From Booklist
Gr. 4^-8. More than 170 years ago, a blind French boy at age 15 invented a system of raised dots on paper that allows the sightless to read and write. Without melodrama, Freedman tells the momentous story in quiet chapters in his best plain style, making the facts immediate and personal. At age 3, Louis Braille was blinded in an accident with a knife. From the age of 12, he worked doggedly, sometimes secretly through the night at a special school in Paris, punching dots on paper, trying to develop a simple code for the alphabet that the blind could read with their fingertips. Woven into the story is an awareness of how the blind child experiences the world, what he remembers. Tension mounts as he refuses to be discouraged by technical and bureaucratic setbacks, until eventually he proves his system to his school and finally to the world. The handsome book design is clear and open. A diagram explains how the Braille alphabet works, and Kate Kessler's full-page shaded pencil illustrations are part of the understated poignant drama. But what about documentation? Is the opening chapter partially fictionalized? No sources are given for the facts and quotes throughout the book, and there's no bibliography. Hazel Rochman ( )
  heathergarcia | May 25, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Russell Freedmanprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kiesler, KateIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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A biography of the nineteenth-century Frenchman who, having been blinded himself at the age of three, went on to develop a system of raised dots on paper that enabled blind people to read and write.

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