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Slow Days, Fast Company: The World, The…
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Slow Days, Fast Company: The World, The Flesh, and L.A. (New York Review… (original 1977; edition 2016)

by Eve Babitz (Author), Matthew Specktor (Introduction)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
262585,446 (4.01)12
"There was a time when no one burned hotter than Eve Babitz. Possessing skin that radiated "its own kind of moral laws," spectacular teeth, and a figure that was the stuff of legend, she seduced seemingly everyone who was anyone in Los Angeles for a long stretch of the 1960s and '70s. But there was one man who proved elusive, and so Babitz did what she did best, she wrote him a book. She also pulled off a remarkable sleight of hand: Slow Days, Fast Company far exceeds its mash-note premise. It is a full-fledged and full-bodied evocation of a bygone Southern California. In ten sun-baked, Santa Ana wind-swept sketches, Babitz re-creates a Los Angeles of movie stars distraught over their success; socialites on three-day drug binges, evading their East Coast banking husbands; soap-opera actors worried that tomorrow's script will kill them off; Italian femme fatales even more fatal than she is. And she even leaves L.A. sometimes, spending an afternoon at the house of flawless Orange County suburbanites, a day among the grape pickers of the Central Valley, a weekend in Palm Springs where her dreams of romance fizzle and her only solace is Virginia Woolf. In the end it doesn't matter if Babitz ever gets the guy--she seduces us"--… (more)
Member:cecily2
Title:Slow Days, Fast Company: The World, The Flesh, and L.A. (New York Review Books Classics)
Authors:Eve Babitz (Author)
Other authors:Matthew Specktor (Introduction)
Info:NYRB Classics (2016), Edition: Main, 184 pages
Collections:Read
Rating:*****
Tags:literary, nostalgic, summer, nyrb, america, 1960s, 1970s, ebook, california

Work Information

Slow Days, Fast Company: The World, The Flesh, and L.A. by Eve Babitz (1977)

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» See also 12 mentions

English (4)  French (1)  All languages (5)
Showing 4 of 4
I loved Eve Babitz’s novel, Eve’s Hollywood, which came out in 1974 and captured her fans of all sorts, as she exposed the 1960s through mostly the L.A. scene, all from the inside. In that book, she casually dropped famous names from rock music, the art scene, as well as some of the biggest film stars, not as dry reporting, but from her personal and legendary experience. She was linked “romantically” (as the press of that time wrote) with so many stars. She was drinking heavily, partying hardy, dropping all manner of drugs, and very active sexually, as she was on her way to becoming a legend.

The style of that previous book was looser and much more scattered than Slow Days, Fast Company, which while still describing the excesses of the 1960s and 70s, is better written. Yet, while containing a more refined style of writing, I have to say that if I’d read this title first, I’m not sure I would have read more of her work, as I so loved the wildness of what she was living and writing. In a way, I miss some of the excesses and the pure chaos of the first book, but I still loved this book. She will be in the middle of describing and explaining a scene, when she will drop killer lines that are so clever, wild, and unexplained, but that fit the story perfectly. I’ll come back to this review after I reflect on the book some more. ( )
  jphamilton | Mar 3, 2022 |
I got bored with this book and stopped halfway through. It wasn't agonizing to read, but it didn't grab me. The writing meanders around, and I didn't grasp the stylings to which others have affectionately alluded. I'll probably finish it later. ( )
  DaveReadsaLittle | Jan 30, 2022 |
Vignettes based on the author's life in LA during the mid 60s through mid 70s. Perfect. I'd never heard of Babitz, had no preconceived notions of what to expect and was gobsmacked by how great the writing was. ( )
  encephalical | Dec 18, 2018 |
The book delivers on its promise--and then some. I read it twice in a single month, and participated at a local Hollywood book club (which added to this novel's mystique, as we discussed places mentioned in the book that are still alive and kicking). Eve's (and yes, I feel like I can speak of her using her first name, because of the intimacy shared within the pages of her novel) passion for life is something I both admire and respect. ( )
  IvanBorodin | Apr 20, 2017 |
Showing 4 of 4
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Eve Babitzprimary authorall editionscalculated
Specktor, MatthewIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tonnerre, GwilymTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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This is a love story and I aplogize; it was inadvertent.
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"There was a time when no one burned hotter than Eve Babitz. Possessing skin that radiated "its own kind of moral laws," spectacular teeth, and a figure that was the stuff of legend, she seduced seemingly everyone who was anyone in Los Angeles for a long stretch of the 1960s and '70s. But there was one man who proved elusive, and so Babitz did what she did best, she wrote him a book. She also pulled off a remarkable sleight of hand: Slow Days, Fast Company far exceeds its mash-note premise. It is a full-fledged and full-bodied evocation of a bygone Southern California. In ten sun-baked, Santa Ana wind-swept sketches, Babitz re-creates a Los Angeles of movie stars distraught over their success; socialites on three-day drug binges, evading their East Coast banking husbands; soap-opera actors worried that tomorrow's script will kill them off; Italian femme fatales even more fatal than she is. And she even leaves L.A. sometimes, spending an afternoon at the house of flawless Orange County suburbanites, a day among the grape pickers of the Central Valley, a weekend in Palm Springs where her dreams of romance fizzle and her only solace is Virginia Woolf. In the end it doesn't matter if Babitz ever gets the guy--she seduces us"--

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