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O Corvo by Edgar Allan Poe
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O Corvo (original 1845; edition 2018)

by Edgar Allan Poe (Author)

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1,573318,858 (4.18)54
"The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". The poem makes use of a number of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references.… (more)
Member:PedroZimerman1
Title:O Corvo
Authors:Edgar Allan Poe (Author)
Info:Sebo Clepsidra (2018)
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The Raven [poem] by Edgar Allan Poe (1845)

Recently added byOswestrian, JuanitaBells, jstruzzi, copesd, private library, bookdrunkard78, ggoldby, Paolabdeg, schollp
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» See also 54 mentions

English (30)  Spanish (1)  All languages (31)
Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
I read the Project Gutenberg edition of this famous poem. A great read anytime but most especially in October, with Halloween just around the corner.


edit*** reread 10-31-2019
relisten actually, The Raven read by Christopher Lee with onscreen text and background music. The music really reminds me of the background music from the movie The Crow, not sure if that is the source, but it added to the experience for me.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BefliMlEzZ8&t=9s ( )
  kevn57 | Dec 8, 2021 |
Very high quality work from Poe. Possibly among the best work produced by American writers... ( )
  scottcholstad | Jan 14, 2020 |
The Raven is a legendary poem, but within the other poems included are more words that will ring with great familiarity. Beautifully flowing poetry from an iconic author. ( )
  AngelaJMaher | Dec 30, 2019 |
Oh boy, this was weird. I don't even know where to begin with the plot. I know this is a wildly loved movie, but I feel like they missed the mark when transitioning this to a book. It was a super short book and felt like the tone of the book felt more like a movie synopsis. I love the story itself, just the writing messed it up for me. This is a weird case where the movie was far better. ( )
  Adamazing | Jul 12, 2019 |



Starting off with the age-old “Once upon a time” and choosing a bleak midnight as his setting, Poe puts a dark spin to it. The speaker is reading books, that are old and forgotten. We see that the speaker is fascinated with the past.
—Frequent use alliteration device throughout.—
Poe creates a setting - removed from reality - in a beautiful way, portraying a dream-like state the narrator is in. The speaker is actually in a hypnopompic state, which is a twilight consciousness between sleeping and waking. It’s as close as we can come to dreaming while awake. Except the hypnogogic state, between waking and sleeping. It is the later state that Poe describes.
Throughout the poem, the speaker is flustered, and scared, telling himself to chill.
It is amazing how Poe makes you live the speaker's state—with all the descriptive setting—and simultaneously adding more microelements to the theme.



For example, in these lines:

Ah, distinctly I Remember it was in the bleak December;
 And each separate dying Ember

The internal rhyme is visible (remember…december), but Poe is also adding to the theme with Ember, which means a small piece of glowing coal/wood in a dying fire.
The year is dying. The fire is dying…describing how dead it is outside, showing how dead he feels inside.
Trees and weather in the winter reflecting his internal feelings.
And with:

...wrought its ghost upon the floor.

He is referring to “each separate dying ember”
This imagery furthers the speaker’s removal from reality – smoke from an ember becomes a ghost. His obsession overwhelms his senses, in reality, removing him from it.

By reading, the speaker is unsuccessfully attempting to distract from his sorrow of the lost love of his life (Lenore)
Perhaps Lenore has been gone long enough that her name is no longer even spoken, or Even saying her name brings sadness to him, so he will no longer speak her name.




Nevermore

A significant portion of the poem details the speaker’s thought process in trying to rationalize the bird’s ability to speak, and the reason it only says the one word, “nevermore”.
Initially, he is surprised to hear it speak and acknowledges that the response didn’t make much sense. Later he surmises that the bird had learned to repeat the word from an owner who had descended into grief and madness, himself so often muttering “nevermore” that the bird picked it up. Just like this actual raven did!
By the end of the poem, he reads meaning into the phrase, as the bird tells him that he will begin to forget Lenore, his lover and that nothing will soothe his pain of his loss.






Also, it is very important to set a theme for yourself before you pick this masterpiece!
You mustn't read this without having a glass of whiskey or wine.
A cup of coffee will do too, but it must be black, obviously.
Dim all the lights, except that old filament bulb.
Put on some light music, or google 'Dark piano music'
Now open your windows, more the dark and gloomy it is, the better.
Summon the raven.
Start reading aloud, or whisper!




Tim Burton gave a beautiful tribute to Poe with this Short Animation

Peter Bradley also made this really good Adoption

I highly recommend listening ‘The Raven’ in these amazing voices:
* Christopher Lee
* Christopher Walken
* Vincent Price
* James Earl Jones
* Basil Rathbone
* Aaron Quinn
( )
  iSatyajeet | Nov 21, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 30 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (24 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Poe, Edgar Allanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dooijes, DickIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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First words
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary, over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore...
Quotations
And the silken sad uncertain rustling of each purple curtain thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the entry for the single poem, "The Raven" (1845); it is not an entry for compilations of multiple works that include "The Raven" and have the title "The Raven".  Please do not combine!



Also, please note that the Common Knowledge field for "Original publication date" refers to the main work, the poem.  "The Raven" was first published in 1845.  If you wish to track particular illustrated editions (such as Gustav Doré), then they should be treated as separate editions. If you combine them, the CK information relates to the original work -- not particular illustrated editions.
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"The Raven" is a narrative poem by American writer Edgar Allan Poe. First published in January 1845, the poem is often noted for its musicality, stylized language, and supernatural atmosphere. It tells of a talking raven's mysterious visit to a distraught lover, tracing the man's slow fall into madness. The lover, often identified as being a student is lamenting the loss of his love, Lenore. Sitting on a bust of Pallas, the raven seems to further instigate his distress with its constant repetition of the word "Nevermore". The poem makes use of a number of folk, mythological, religious, and classical references.

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Book description
he Raven (O Corvo) de Edgar Allan Poe é talvez o mais famoso poema da literatura dos Estados Unidos. Foi publicado pela primeira vez em 1845 e consolidou a reputação do seu autor no meio literário de Nova York.Após sua morte, quatro anos depois (1849), The Raven ganhou fama internacional e foi encarado como desafio por diversos tradutores, como Charles Baudelaire, que o traduziu para o francês e Machado de Assis que o traduziu para o português.A tradução de Baudelaire inspirou Gustave Doré, ilustrador famoso por suas gravuras da Bíblia, de Dom Quixote e da Divina Comédia. Doré compôs 26 gravuras em 1875. Foi seu último trabalho, publicado após sua morte em 1883. Sete das ilustrações de Doré ilustram este site.The Raven é de fato um desafio aos tradutores, que tentam preservar ao máximo a sua estrutura rítmica e sonora, e ao mesmo tempo manter o texto fiel à história narrada, com seus momentos dramáticos. Tradução alguma poderá igualar-se ao original, mas muitas demonstram uma criatividade e esforço fora do comum. A tradução de Machado de Assis, embora não preserve a mesma estrutura do original, preserva, no seu ritmo próprio, o terror claustrofóbico que caracteriza o poema original. Ao traduzir The Raven para o português, Fernando Pessoa ousou manter o ritmo e a rima do poema original, produzindo uma das melhores traduções já feitas para a língua portuguesa.Este site contém o poema original em inglês, a tradução (em versos) de Fernando pessoa e uma versão em prosa. Todas estão ilustradas com as mesmas imagens. Na minha tradução tentei manter um tom poético na prosa, que talvez lembre, vagamente e de vez em quando, os sussuros e os ecos da poesia.

Fonte: http://www.helderdarocha.com.br/
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