HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human…
Loading...

Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence (edition 1990)

by Hans Moravec

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
202491,854 (3.9)1
Imagine attending a lecture at the turn of the twentieth century in which Orville Wright speculates about the future of transportation, or one in which Alexander Graham Bell envisages satellite communications and global data banks. Mind Children, written by an internationally renowned roboticist, offers a comparable experience--a mind-boggling glimpse of a world we may soon share with our artificial progeny. Filled with fresh ideas and insights, this book is one of the most engaging and controversial visions of the future ever written by a serious scholar. Hans Moravec convincingly argues that we are approaching a watershed in the history of life--a time when the boundaries between biological and postbiological intelligence will begin to dissolve. Within forty years, Moravec believes, we will achieve human equivalence in our machines, not only in their capacity to reason but also in their ability to perceive, interact with, and change their complex environment. The critical factor is mobility. A computer rooted to one place is doomed to static iterations, whereas a machine on the prowl, like a mobile organism, must evolve a richer fund of knowledge about an ever-changing world upon which to base its actions. In order to achieve anything near human equivalence, robots will need, at the least, the capacity to perform ten trillion calculations per second. Given the trillion-fold increase in computational power since the end of the nineteenth century, and the promise of exotic technologies far surpassing the now-familiar lasers and even superconductors, Moravec concludes that our hardware will have no trouble meeting this forty-year timetable. But human equivalence is just the beginning, not an upper bound. Once the tireless thinking capacity of robots is directed to the problem of their own improvement and reproduction, even the sky will not limit their voracious exploration of the universe. In the concluding chapters Moravec challenges us to imagine with him the possibilities and pitfalls of such a scenario. Rather than warning us of takeover by robots, the author invites us, as we approach the end of this millennium, to speculate about a plausible, wonderful postbiological future and the ways in which our minds might participate in its unfolding.… (more)
Member:starburst
Title:Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence
Authors:Hans Moravec
Info:Harvard University Press (1990), Paperback, 224 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:the future, robot and human intelligence

Work details

Mind Children: The Future of Robot and Human Intelligence by Hans Moravec

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 4 of 4
A great read, thought-provoking and my go-to reference when it comes to AI. Keeps me in the check when I'm out there shaping behaviors with new technology. ( )
  perhapstoopink | Sep 25, 2016 |
A great read, thought-provoking and my go-to reference when it comes to AI. Keeps me in the check when I'm out there shaping behaviors with new technology. ( )
  perhapstoopink | Sep 25, 2016 |
Published 1988. CMU robotics professor. Prediction that computer intelligence will exceed human intelligenge around 2020. Along with Drexler and Kurzweill: robotics/AI visionary.
  fernig | Sep 6, 2010 |
Hans Moravec is director of the Mobile Robot Laboratory of Carnegie Mellon University and has spent his time from his days as a graduate student investigating artificial intelligence. Specifically he was attracted by the debate about the possibility of replacing the human nervous system with a more durable artificial equivalent. His essays turned into articles and his articles eventually turned into this book.

Of course the idea is not accepted by many people but Moravec doesn't go into the moral question. In his view the new world will be one in which "the human race has been swept away by the tide of cultural change, usurped by its own artificial progeny". In other words given the rate of improvement in artificial intelligence, robots in the not too distant future will be able outperform human beings and so they won't need them anymore.

At first the idea seems bizarre but so would the technology of the late 20th century looking from the vantage point of the 19th. Moravec collects all the evidence throughout the book. He presents very clearly data on the increases in computing power running from electro-mechanical machines, vacuum tubes, transistors to integrated circuits and shows how a top down approach (system design) and bottom up approach (learning evolving systems) are gradually chipping away at "humans only" areas.

Interestingly computers in medicine can already offer reliable diagnosis and they can play chess at grand-master level. They are everywhere in process control and are taking the first steps in learning by being given likes and dislikes and the capacity for boredom (the gradual fade of learnt and recorded tasks in favour of new ones).

Moravec builds up a convincing picture and along the way the reader gets to look at the 1972 ARPAnet breakdown caused by a spontaneous error (mutation) in a piece of data that went on to infect the whole network. Or alternatively the direction that the evolution of duplicating speciating data objects might take. He expects digital wildlife to reproduce sexually as this is the optimum way to provide the variety needed to fill the niches in their new world.

He plays a robotic version of Axelrod's prisoners dilemma and concludes that the "tit for tat" result applies (i.e. robots would find it in their interests to cooperate between themselves-but not necessarily with us).

Essentially the book follows Dawkins idea of human evolution having switched from genes to memes (stored knowledge evolution or evolution in the library) and takes it to its logical conclusion when knowledge abandons its human hosts.

This is a very surprising book worth looking out for. ( )
1 vote Miro | Sep 26, 2005 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hans Moravecprimary authorall editionscalculated
Lambrechts, RémyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original title
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
En souvenir de mon père, qui m’a appris à bricoler.
À ma mère, qui m’a appris à lire.
À Ella, qui a fait de moi un tout.
First words
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Prologue

Engagés depuis des milliards d’années dans une implacable course aux armements, nos gènes ont fini par se montrer plus malins. Ils ont fabriqué une arme si puissante que dans cette lutte il n’y aura ni gagnants ni perdants. Il ne s’agit pas de la bombe à hydrogène, car un conflit nucléaire généralisé ne ferait que retarder ce qui se trame et qui est immensément plus intéressant. Ce qui nous attend, ce n’est pas l’anéantissement. [...]

CHAPITRE 1
L’esprit en mouvement

Je crois que les robots doués d’une intelligence humaine seront courants d’ici une cinquantaine d’années. En comparaison, les esprits des meilleures machines d’aujourd'hui s’apparentent plutôt à ceux d’insectes. Pourtant, ce seul résultat représente déjà une avancée prodigieuse qui a pris quelques dizaines d’années à peine.
[...]
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Canonical DDC/MDS

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.9)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 5
3.5
4 6
4.5
5 7

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 142,390,445 books! | Top bar: Always visible