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Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's…
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Thank You for Being Late: An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of… (2016)

by Thomas L. Friedman

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Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
Overall, I enjoyed Thank You for Being Late (TYFBL) and appreciated the author's research and insights. However, given that the book was published prior to the inauguration of the current president, the narrative was significantly dated -- a bit of a time capsule -- because it didn't speak to the host of more recently-emerged social and public policy challenges faced by our nation and its allies.

I admired the author's ability to wrap his hands and head around some extremely gnarly technology issues and to elucidate them in comprehensible layman's terms. Overall, Friedman's prose was OK, if inelegant -- but you're not reading a book like this for well-turned sentences. Originally, I was afraid that boiling down the primary forces of the current acceleration of change to an alliterative trio (Mother Earth, Market, Moore's Law) was overly precious and wouldn't work...but I warmed to the framing as the book proceeded. At other times, however, Friedman seemed overly cutesy, e.g. labeling the cloud as "the supernova."

I enjoyed the final few sections of TYFBL most of all, because they described a set of conditions at the local level in which social progress was not just possible but also tangible. I felt inspired by Friedman's examples, and am motivated to figure out how I might plug into contributing to the kind of social change he describes. Especially at this moment in our nation's history, heaven knows we all need to help. ( )
  EpicTale | Oct 1, 2018 |
Friedman's book explores what he calls the three accelerations that are driving our world today - technology, globalization, and climate change. In each of these areas, he explores the history that brings us to this point in time and provides insight through his many years of experience as a journalist. I found the content interesting and engaging. His "answer" falls to the local approach to resolving our challenges - states, cities, towns - at a time when our national government is still mired in a gridlock. ( )
  CYGeeker | Sep 6, 2018 |
I enjoyed this book—Friedman seems to capture my attention. However, it feels like it is all ready dated. After having read the “sample” I didn’t feel ready to pay to read the second half. I may take a trip to my public library... ( )
  kaulsu | May 10, 2018 |
I couldn't finish the book. It is basically about the history of advances in technology. I found the book annoying. Things like the fact that the author calls "The Cloud" the cloud/supernova. ( )
  KamGeb | May 6, 2018 |
Very good! I really enjoyed his analysis of this fast-paced, stress filled world we live in. His analysis of why this is I found compelling. For all that feel the world is going "to hell in a hand-basket", this book offers optimism as well as an informed analysis as to why. I found this to be a great read. ( )
  ifisher | Dec 15, 2017 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374273537, Hardcover)

A field guide to the twenty-first century, written by one of its most celebrated observers

We all sense it―something big is going on. You feel it in your workplace. You feel it when you talk to your kids. You can’t miss it when you read the newspapers or watch the news. Our lives are being transformed in so many realms all at once―and it is dizzying.

In Thank You for Being Late, a work unlike anything he has attempted before, Thomas L. Friedman exposes the tectonic movements that are reshaping the world today and explains how to get the most out of them and cushion their worst impacts. You will never look at the world the same way again after you read this book: how you understand the news, the work you do, the education your kids need, the investments your employer has to make, and the moral and geopolitical choices our country has to navigate will all be refashioned by Friedman’s original analysis.

Friedman begins by taking us into his own way of looking at the world―how he writes a column. After a quick tutorial on that subject, he proceeds to write what could only be called a giant column about the twenty-first century. His thesis: to understand the twenty-first century, you need to understand that the planet’s three largest forces―Moore’s law (technology); the Market (globalization); and Mother Nature (climate change and biodiversity loss)―are accelerating all at once. These accelerations are transforming five key realms: the workplace, politics, geopolitics, ethics, and community.

Why is this happening? As Friedman shows, the exponential increase in computing power defined by Moore’s law has a lot to do with it. The year 2007 was a major inflection point: the release of the iPhone, together with advances in silicon chips, software, storage, sensors, and networking, created a new technology platform. Friedman calls this platform “the supernova”―for it is an extraordinary release of energy that is reshaping everything from how we hail a taxi to the fate of nations to our most intimate relationships. It is creating vast new opportunities for individuals and small groups to save the world―or to destroy it.

Thank You for Being Late is a work of contemporary history that serves as a field manual for how to write and think about this era of accelerations. It’s also an argument for “being late”―for pausing to appreciate this amazing historical epoch we’re passing through and reflecting on its possibilities and dangers. To amplify this point, Friedman revisits his Minnesota hometown in his moving concluding chapters; there, he explores how communities can create a “topsoil of trust” to anchor their increasingly diverse and digital populations.

With his trademark vitality, wit, and optimism, Friedman shows that we can overcome the multiple stresses of an age of accelerations―if we slow down, if we dare to be late and use the time to reimagine work, politics, and community. Thank You for Being Late is Friedman’s most ambitious book―and an essential guide to the present and the future.

(retrieved from Amazon Fri, 02 Sep 2016 15:20:09 -0400)

Friedman discusses how the key to understanding the 21st century is understanding that the planet's three largest forces -- Moore's law (technology), the market (globalization) and Mother Nature (climate change and biodiversity loos) -- are accelerating all at once. And these accelerations are transforming the five key realms: the workplace, politics, geopolitics, ethics, and community. Friedman posits that we should purposely "be late" -- we should pause to appreciate the amazing historical epoch we're passing through and to reflect on its possibilities and dangers.--"We all sense it--something big is going on. You feel it in your workplace. You feel it when you talk to your kids. You can't miss it when you read the newspapers or watch the news. Our lives are being transformed in so many realms all at once--and it is dizzying. In Thank You for Being Late, a work unlike anything he has attempted before, Thomas L. Friedman exposes the tectonic movements that are reshaping the world today and explains how to get the most out of them and cushion their worst impacts. You will never look at the world the same way again after you read this book; how you understand the news, the work you do, the education your kids need, the investments your employer has to make, and the moral and geopolitical choices our country has to navigate will all be refashioned by Friedman's original analysis. Friedman begins by taking us into his own way of looking at the world--how he writes a column. After a quick tutorial, he proceeds to write what could only be called a giant column about the twenty-first century. His thesis: to understand the twenty-first century, you need to understand that the planets three largest forces--Moore's law (technology), the Market (globalization), and Mother Nature (climate change and biodiversity loss)--are accelerating all at once. These accelerations are transforming five key realms: the workplace, politics, geopolitics, ethics, and community. Why is this happening? As Friedman shows, the exponential increase in computing power defined by Moore's law has a lot to do with it. The year 2007 was a major inflection point: the release of the iPhone, together with advances in silicon chips, software, storage, sensors, and networking, created a new technology platform. Friedman calls this platform "the supernova"--for it is an extraordinary release of energy that is reshaping everything from how we hail a taxi to the fate of nations to our most intimate relationships. It is creating vast new opportunities for individuals and small groups to save the world--or to destroy it. Thank You for Being Late is a work of contemporary history that serves as a field manual for how to write and think about this era of accelerations. It's also an argument for "being late"--for pausing to appreciate this amazing historical epoch we're passing through and to reflect on its possibilities and dangers. To amplify this point, Friedman revisits his Minnesota hometown in his moving concluding chapters; there, he explores how communities can create a "topsoil of trust" to anchor their increasingly diverse and digital populations. With his trademark vitality, wit, and optimism, Friedman shows that we can overcome the multiple stresses of an age of accelerations--if we slow down, if we dare to be late and use the time to reimagine work, politics, and community Thank You for Being Late is Friedman's most ambitious book--and an essential guide to the present and the future."--Dust jacket.… (more)

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