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Murder on the Railways by Peter Haining
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Murder on the Railways (1996)

by Peter Haining (Editor)

Other authors: Agatha Christie (Contributor), Ken Follett (Contributor), Patricia Highsmith (Contributor), Ruth Rendell (Contributor), Dorothy L. Sayers (Contributor)1 more, Georges Simenon (Contributor)

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» See also 2 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
From time to time I make a genuine effort to broaden my reading. I even try Fiction. This rarely works out for me – I sit there muttering “I can write better than!” and “Totally not credible” and usually abandon these attempts with a half-guilty rage on triteness.

The chapter introductions by Peter Haining are well written, crafted to whet the appetite for the pieces that follow and are informative.

I am afraid his was the only authorship I enjoyed.
  John_Vaughan | Sep 16, 2011 |
A collection of short stories by well-known crime authors, including Agatha Christie, Georges Simenon, Patricia Highsmith, Dorothy Sayers, Ruth Rendell and Ken Follett. They all contain some connection to railways (some more so than others), and they're all about crime, albeit not all murder. Some of these stories are old and unusual, and some have been out of print for decades. A thoroughly enjoyable book. ( )
  johnthefireman | Jul 4, 2007 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Haining, PeterEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Christie, AgathaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Follett, KenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Highsmith, PatriciaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rendell, RuthContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sayers, Dorothy L.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Simenon, GeorgesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Murder on the Railways brings together the best of the short stories about crime on the world's railways. The stories in this anthology feature some of the most famous trains and best known fictional characters and some stories have become classic films.… (more)

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