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Marigold in Godmother's House by Joyce…
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Marigold in Godmother's House (original 1934; edition 2001)

by Joyce Lankester Brisley

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201878,921 (4.25)1
When she is seven, Marigold is invited to stay at her godmother's house. Her godmother had always sent her the most amazing presents, but nothing would beat this trip - for Marigold's godmother is really a fairy godmother!
Member:ncw
Title:Marigold in Godmother's House
Authors:Joyce Lankester Brisley
Info:Jane Nissen Books (2001), Paperback, 96 pages
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Marigold in Godmother's House by Joyce Lankester Brisley (1934)

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'For Marigold's godmother..was one of the genuine, old-fashioned, storybook kind - a real fairy godmother!, November 2, 2014

This review is from: Marigold in Godmother's House (Paperback)
Absolutely enchanting book, which I first read aged 7; have just been given the copy, 45 years on, and re-read it - the narrative and pictures are still totally vivid.
When little Marigold Mobbs goes to stay with her fairy godmother (a Victorian looking lady in black) for a couple of days, nothing is as it seems. The seemingly unpleasant things in life - porridge for breakfast, going to bed early, piano practice - all become magical experiences - ice-cream, a flying bed, and an enchanted piano that opens the windows and lets the birds in. And who could forget the jug and basin (marigold-patterned, of course) turning into a rock pool and waterfall for an enchanted bath?
Until I read it today, I'd been oblivious to any moral message; as an adult one picks up on the underlying theme of obedience ('never go beyond the gates', Godmother repeatedly warns Marigold) and the idea that while holidays are enjoyable, they are only an occasional treat, for 'there is work to be done.'
Beautiful b/w illustrations by the author throughout. ( )
  starbox | Nov 2, 2014 |
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Once upon a time there was a little girl named Marigold Mobbs.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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When she is seven, Marigold is invited to stay at her godmother's house. Her godmother had always sent her the most amazing presents, but nothing would beat this trip - for Marigold's godmother is really a fairy godmother!

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