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Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: A Novel…
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Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: A Novel (original 2017; edition 2018)

by Gail Honeyman (Author)

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2,5071983,641 (4.16)211
Member:BookshelfMonstrosity
Title:Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: A Novel
Authors:Gail Honeyman (Author)
Info:Penguin Books (2018), Edition: Reprint, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:fiction, social isolation, single women, friendship, computer technicians

Work details

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine: A Novel by Gail Honeyman (2017)

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English (195)  Italian (1)  Latvian (1)  All languages (197)
Showing 1-5 of 195 (next | show all)
Eleanor Oliphant is not completely fine. She is the survivor of horrific childhood abuse, scarred physically and emotionally. She negotiates life by avoiding human relationships, but her careful world is disrupted when she and a colleague help an old man who collapses by the road. Gratitude and friendship begin to break her shell but that allows childhood memories to resurface, and she doesn’t know if she can survive reliving her past.

When I picked this up at the library I was mistakenly expecting a charming, quirky romance. It was so much better than that. It deserved the prizes it won. ( )
  Griffin22 | Mar 24, 2019 |
I really liked this book. The writing is very descriptive and the characters are complex and messy, like real people. Elinor is really a mess in the beginning. It’s clear she has some sort of mental illness or social disorder but it’s not defined, and exposed in bits and pieces. Told from her point of view, it seems like she doesn’t fit in because everyone else is odd. It was slow to get going for me but picked up and I enjoyed the evolution of Elinor. This book perfectly conveys how one moment in a life can change everything. 5/5 stars ⭐️ ( )
  justjoshinreads | Mar 22, 2019 |
Very good book, starts slowly and gets better and better. Very very well narrated by Cathleen McCarron in my version. Recommended for anyone who loves a psychological thriller. ( )
  jvgravy | Mar 19, 2019 |
I don't want to be overly harsh but this was a dreadful load of old tripe. Emotionally manipulative and unoriginal Eleanor Oliphant is such an obvious authorial construct that the novel is doomed from the start. She is weighed down with a whole bunch of movie cliches - selective amnesia, forgotten sibling, imaginary correspondent - and a glaringly undiagnosed case of movie autism. She is also a bender-prone, bottle-a-day vodkaholic who just decides to stop. Nothing about her makes sense.

We are supposed to believe that having been sequestered from the world until the age of 10 followed by years in foster care, school, university and nine years working for a graphic design firm, she has mastered computers, Facebook, Twitter and the internet, but never in her life come across the concept of Jeremy Clarkson or SpongeBob SquarePants... because it's funnier that way. Nothing holds together. There is no consistency or integrity to Eleanor's condition. She's not a person, just a device to tell a story about loneliness.

Because that's all this book really is. It's a story about loneliness. Certainly a worthy subject for a 21st century novel, but there has to be a better way to write it than this cack-handed, curious incident knock-off, puddle of slush. ( )
1 vote asxz | Mar 13, 2019 |
An excellent telling of the early life of an abused child and what happened after her care was taken over by social services. This is told throughout the book by Eleanor herself as she struggles to become a "normal" person and seek human company after always relying only upon herself. Eleanor is very bright and very opinionated. ( )
  baughga | Mar 5, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 195 (next | show all)
From pop-star crushes to meals for one, the life of an outsider is vividly captured in this joyful debut, discovered through a writing competition and sold for huge sums worldwide...And what a joy it is. The central character of Eleanor feels instantly and insistently real...This is a narrative full of quiet warmth and deep and unspoken sadness. It makes you want to throw a party and invite everyone you know and give them a hug, even that person at work everyone thinks is a bit weird.
 
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Dedication
For my family
First words
When people ask me what I do - taxi drivers, hairdressers - I tell them I work in an office.
Quotations
Sport is a mystery to me. In primary school, sports day was the one day of the year when the less academically gifted students could triumph, winning prizes for jumping fastest in a sack, or running from point A to point B more quickly than their classmates. How they loved to wear those badges on their blazers the next day, as if a silver in the egg and spoon race was some sort of compensation for not understanding how to use an apostrophe.
I have always enjoyed reading, but I've never been sure how to select appropriate material. There are so many books in the world--how do you tell them all apart? How do you know which one will match your tastes and interests? That's why I just pick the first book I see. There's no point trying to choose. The covers are of very little help, because they always say only good things, and I've found out to my cost that they're rarely accurate. "Exhilarating" "Dazzling" "Hilarious." No.
She was shiny too, her skin, her hair, her shoes, her teeth. I hadn't even realized before; I am matte, dull, scuffed.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0735220689, Hardcover)

"Eleanor Oliphant is a truly original literary creation: funny, touching, and unpredictable. Her journey out of dark shadows is absolutely gripping." --Jojo Moyes, #1 New York Times bestselling author of Me Before You

"Deft, compassionate and deeply moving--Honeyman's debut will have you rooting for Eleanor with every turning page." --Paula McClain, New York Times bestselling author of The Paris Wife and Circling the Sun


No one’s ever told Eleanor that life should be better than fine. 

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. 

But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.

Smart, warm, uplifting, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine is the story of an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose deadpan weirdness and unconscious wit make for an irresistible journey as she realizes. . .
 
The only way to survive is to open your heart. 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 26 Jan 2017 14:40:02 -0500)

"Smart, warm, uplifting, the story of an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose deadpan weirdness and unconscious wit make for an irresistible journey as she realizes the only way to survive is to open her heart. Meet Eleanor Oliphant: she struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she's thinking. That, combined with her unusual appearance (scarred cheek, tendency to wear the same clothes year in, year out), means that Eleanor has become a creature of habit (to say the least) and a bit of a loner. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kind of friends who rescue each other from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond's big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one"--… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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