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Priestdaddy: A Memoir by Patricia Lockwood
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Priestdaddy: A Memoir (edition 2018)

by Patricia Lockwood (Author)

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5964130,060 (3.87)44
Father Greg Lockwood is unlike any Catholic priest you have ever met, a man who lounges in boxer shorts, loves action movies, and whose constant jamming on the guitar reverberates "like a whole band dying in a plane crash in 1972." His daughter is an irreverent poet who long ago left the Church's country. When an unexpected crisis leads her and her husband to move back into her parents' rectory, their two worlds collide. In Priestdaddy, Lockwood interweaves emblematic moments from her childhood and adolescence, from an ill-fated family hunting trip and an abortion clinic sit-in where her father was arrested to her involvement in a cultlike Catholic youth group, with scenes that chronicle the eight-month adventure she and her husband had in her parents' household after a decade of living on their own. Lockwood details her education of a seminarian who is also living at the rectory, tries to explain Catholicism to her husband, who is mystified by its bloodthirstiness and arcane laws, and encounters a mysterious substance on a hotel bed with her mother. Lockwood pivots from the raunchy to the sublime, from the comic to the deeply serious, exploring issues of belief, belonging, and personhood. Priestdaddy is an entertaining, unforgettable portrait of a deeply odd religious upbringing, and how one balances a hard-won identity with the weight of family and tradition.… (more)
Member:august8914
Title:Priestdaddy: A Memoir
Authors:Patricia Lockwood (Author)
Info:Riverhead Books (2018), Edition: Reprint, 352 pages
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Priestdaddy: A Memoir by Patricia Lockwood

Recently added bysharvani, private library, Shawanal, mring42, no2camels, Jinjer, larrybenfield, joannabgaff
  1. 00
    The World's Largest Man: A Memoir by Harrison Scott Key (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: The fathers in these two books are very similar, although Lockwood tempers her humor with a lot of honesty and introspection, while Key keeps things humorous (and more shallow).
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» See also 44 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
An extremely insightful look at religion and living in a religious family. The writing is poetic, and I would recommend this book as both a good memoir and a piece of modern poetry. The author's look at the church and Christianity is provoking. ( )
  larrybenfield | Jul 14, 2021 |
Imagine not only being the daughter of a married catholic priest, but having to move back in with your parents after your marriage.

This is rip roaringly hilarious, and her descriptions killed me. There were hints of more serious things going on behind the so-crazy-you-have-to-laugh facade, though. While it's absolutely her prerogative to choose what to highlight and what not to disclose, and she's also making the choice to allow her readers to laugh freely without conscience, it would have been a deeper memoir if the curtain had been pulled back just a little more. She lets herself display her anger at the Catholic Church, and that does give context and resonance. ( )
  arosoff | Jul 11, 2021 |
Patricia Lockwood's father is a Catholic priest. Which is less scandalous than it sounds: apparently there's a loophole that means under a very particular set of odd circumstances, it's permissible for a priest to be married. That's not the only way her dad is weird, though. He's chock-full of eccentricities that I kept wanting to find entertaining, but which are mostly just kind of awful. Her mother's a hoot, though.

Anyway, in this memoir Lockwood writes about her experiences of growing up in this household and this church, about returning to live with her parents again for a while as an adult, about her very complicated feelings about Catholicism, and about her own calling as a poet.

Her writing is weird, vivid, thoughtful, frequently hilarious, sometimes moving, sometimes profound and generally amazing in ways that don't necessarily seem like they should work, but really really do. I'm not sure quite what I expected from it going in, but what I got was nothing I could have anticipated, and it was kind of fascinating. ( )
1 vote bragan | Apr 16, 2021 |
Patricia (Trish) has grown up in a home where her father is a priest. He is a strong personality and tends to make others feel less than perfect. Trish and her siblings are surrounded with Christ symbols and are constantly reminded of the trinity and the Virgin Mary and other religious stories.

This his is a very interesting book and there are sections where I was laughing out loud. Patricia Lockwood's turning of phrases is acute and done well. ( )
  JReynolds1959 | Apr 6, 2021 |
Priestdaddy did finally get LOL funny around page 75, as opposed to wry or clever which it was before that. After the humorous point in the book, the author seemed to relax and get lyrical. She revealed herself to be the author of the free verse poem, "Rape Joke" that went viral 7 or 8 years ago now, and I started to pay more attention.

Much of the book dragged for me, seeming to be too vague or too specific, and I wondered whether I am too old (the author is half my age) or too non-Roman Catholic (as a lapsed Congregationalist) for it to resonate with me. But then she writes passages like this:

"I know all women are supposed to be strong enough now to strangle presidents and patriarchies between their powerful thighs, but it doesn't work that way. Many of us were actually affected, by male systems and male anger, in ways we cannot always articulate or overcome. Sometimes, when the ceiling seems especially low and the past especially close, I think to myself, I did not make it out. I am still there in that place of diminishment, where that voice an octave deeper than mine is telling me what I am."

In sum: the brilliant parts vastly outweighed the meh parts for me. ( )
  vwinsloe | Mar 27, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 41 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Patricia Lockwoodprimary authorall editionscalculated
Willey, RachelCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For my family
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"Before they allowed your father to be a priest," my mother tells me, "they made me take the Psychopath Test."
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I know all women are supposed to be strong enough now to strangle presidents and patriarchies between their powerful thighs, but it doesn't work that way. Many of us were actually affected, by male systems and male anger, in ways we cannot always articulate or overcome. Sometimes, when the ceiling seems especially low and the past especially close, I think to myself, I did not make it out. I am still there in that place of diminishment, where that voice an octave deeper than mine is telling me what I am.
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Father Greg Lockwood is unlike any Catholic priest you have ever met, a man who lounges in boxer shorts, loves action movies, and whose constant jamming on the guitar reverberates "like a whole band dying in a plane crash in 1972." His daughter is an irreverent poet who long ago left the Church's country. When an unexpected crisis leads her and her husband to move back into her parents' rectory, their two worlds collide. In Priestdaddy, Lockwood interweaves emblematic moments from her childhood and adolescence, from an ill-fated family hunting trip and an abortion clinic sit-in where her father was arrested to her involvement in a cultlike Catholic youth group, with scenes that chronicle the eight-month adventure she and her husband had in her parents' household after a decade of living on their own. Lockwood details her education of a seminarian who is also living at the rectory, tries to explain Catholicism to her husband, who is mystified by its bloodthirstiness and arcane laws, and encounters a mysterious substance on a hotel bed with her mother. Lockwood pivots from the raunchy to the sublime, from the comic to the deeply serious, exploring issues of belief, belonging, and personhood. Priestdaddy is an entertaining, unforgettable portrait of a deeply odd religious upbringing, and how one balances a hard-won identity with the weight of family and tradition.

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