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The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
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The Hate U Give

by Angie Thomas

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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2,7581853,133 (4.5)145
Recently added bySarah_Klein, private library, rena75, Daniel_Bach, choubetcha, mcginney, CarlDuesler, J.J.H, baobab
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» See also 145 mentions

English (177)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  German (1)  All languages (182)
Showing 1-5 of 177 (next | show all)
Actually the best novel I've read all year. For YA, it's so sophisticated and real, not preachy at all. It felt authentic in every way. Sad, joyful, angry, and a million more feelings were what I felt while reading.

Honestly, everyone should read this book. I'm about to buy copies for my entire family. ( )
  Katie_Roscher | Jan 18, 2019 |
https://theperksofbeingpeculiar.wordpress.com/2018/11/06/review-the-hate-u-give/

This book was so so perfect, there is no way I can possibly write a review for it. There are no flaws for me to mention, and every time I think about the book I’m so overwhelmed with emotion I can’t even process my thoughts enough to think of something to write.

Instead, I’m going to mention a few of my favourite quotes. Powerful quotes. Quotes that show how important this book is.

“I’ve seen it happen over and over again: a black person gets killed just for being black, and all hell breaks loose. I’ve Tweeted RIP hashtags, reblogged pictures on Tumblr, and signed every petition out there. I always said that if I saw it happen to somebody, I would have the loudest voice, making sure the world knew what went down.

Now I am that person, and I’m too afraid to speak.” – pg. 38

“Goodbyes hurt the most when the other person’s already gone.” – pg. 69

“Sometimes you can do everything right and things will still go wrong. The key is to never stop doing right.” – pg. 154

“you don’t kill someone for opening a car door. If you do, you shouldn’t be a cop.” – pg. 252

This book is probably the best and most important book I have ever read, and if you get a chance to read it, I would beg you to do so!

UPDATE: I read this book a few months ago but never published the review, so I wanted to say a few things about the movie too. I was super excited to watch it the day it was released in the UK, and I was not disappointed! I don’t have much to say on top of what I already mentioned in the book review, because the film was extremely similar to the book.

Without completely spoiling the changes, a couple of characters who were pretty major in the book were removed. Angie explained how this was done to keep the focus on the main issue, and I agree it may have been more of a distraction. The other change was something added in, and I can’t really say much without spoiling things because it was pretty close to the end, but it was a shock, and I’m glad it was added in!

I’d say I loved the film as much as I love the book! I will admit that I cried throughout the majority of the movie (and luckily, I was in the cinema alone!). The film was difficult to watch in all of the right ways. I would recommend it to those who have read the book and also those who are just interested in the movie! ( )
  perksofbeingpeculiar | Jan 17, 2019 |
I know this book has gotten a lot of hype this year and let me tell you…

It has earned every last ounce of hype, and then some.

Starr Carter lives two lives. There is the Starr who lives in the gang riddled neighborhood of Garden Heights, whose dad is an ex-con who used to run the streets as a gang lord. And there is the Starr who attends the prestigious, private, predominately white prep school across town. Starr tenuously keeps these two worlds separate, until the day when her best friend is shot and killed by police after a routine traffic stop.

First things first, I listened to this one on audiobook read by the immensely talented Bonnie Turpin (she did Yellow Crocus & Mustard Seed), she is definitely on my short list of favorite audiobook readers!

I can’t really adequately put into words how much I enjoyed this book. It was so relevant and timely; a story that is all too real and heartbreaking and sheds a much needed light on the issues of police brutality, implicit bias, and white privilege. Perpetrators aren’t always the blatant racists, but can be found in even the most well meaning of people. It is an insidious problem within our culture, one that people of color face on a daily basis, and one that we (i.e white people) need to be more cognizant of and willing to work within our communities to address.

Starr straddles this thin line between worlds, always keeping them separate and disconnected from one another; watching her break down these internal partitions around the different versions of her life was both liberating and enlightening. The entire book from beginning to end is addicting. I laughed (Harry Potter houses are actually gangs theory) and cried (no spoilers!) and will be recommending this read to everyone I know. It will also most certainly be on my year end wrap up!

10/10 recommend this one! ( )
  courtneygiraldo | Jan 14, 2019 |
The Hate U Give is the title of a book about a black girl who sees her black friend get shot by a white cop. The title is inspired by Tupac’s THUG LIFE ( The HAte U Give Little Infants F!@#s Everybody.) The book is basically about injustice. Starr, the main character, lives in a ghetto and she is driving back to her house when the cop pulls them over. Khalil (the boy who got shot) is asked to show his registration and stuff. He does. He opens the door to ask if Starr is okay and reaches for a hairbrush. The cop shoots him. Starr is scarred and it takes her awhile to find her voice.

You should read The Hate U Give because it is a good book. I think that the author wrote the book to educate society about the injustice and racism that is still happening. I hate it when people joke about that stuff because it’s real and it’s an issue. It might not be for them, but all the people living in the ghetto are still being shown discrimination. Starr, the main character, lives ina ghetto and that is why her friend got shot. Because the white cop just assumed, because her friend was black and lived in the ghetto, that he was, to put it simply, a threat and a drug dealer, he shot him. The book follows Starr, who must learn to speak up. ( )
  JaynaP.B4 | Jan 13, 2019 |
This book raises awareness, an eye opener, and super powerful. This story left me with so much emotions. ( )
  nu-bibliophile | Jan 10, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 177 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Angie Thomasprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cartwright, DebraCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mutsaers, JasperTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stempel, JennaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Turpin, BahniNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does-or does not-say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0062498533, Hardcover)

Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement, Angie Thomas’s searing debut about an ordinary girl in extraordinary circumstances addresses issues of racism and police violence with intelligence, heart, and unflinching honesty. Soon to be a major motion picture from Fox 2000/Temple Hill Productions.

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

(retrieved from Amazon Tue, 03 Jan 2017 10:50:39 -0500)

(see all 2 descriptions)

After witnessing her friend's death at the hands of a police officer, Starr Carter's life is complicated when the police and a local drug lord try to intimidate her in an effort to learn what happened the night Kahlil died.

» see all 6 descriptions

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