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The hate u give by Angie Thomas
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The hate u give (edition 2017)

by Angie Thomas

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3,5082352,319 (4.48)182
"Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life"--… (more)
Member:AC.Belgrade
Title:The hate u give
Authors:Angie Thomas
Info:London : Walker Books, 2017
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:Young adults

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The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

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» See also 182 mentions

English (230)  Spanish (2)  Dutch (1)  Hungarian (1)  German (1)  All languages (235)
Showing 1-5 of 230 (next | show all)
3.5 stars ( )
  Erin-Dagenais | Sep 18, 2019 |
Starr Carter, the 16 year old narrator of Angie Thomas' novel is a black girl attending a white prep school while living in a neighborhood that hosts drug dealers and gangs. It's a caring neighborhood where everyone looks out for you and has some understanding why thug life is a reality. The title of the novel is the explanation of thug life: The Hate U Give Little Infants F.... Everybody. As Khalil explains to Starr, "Meaning what society give us as youth, it bites them in the ass when we wild out. "
Khalil is Starr's forever childhood friend whose murder by a white policeman while performing a traffic stop becomes the catalyst for Starr's transformation. Starr has lived one life as a basketball player for a prep school called Williamson. "Williamson Starr doesn’t use slang—if a rapper would say it, she doesn’t say it, even if her white friends do. Slang makes them cool. Slang makes her “hood.” Williamson Starr holds her tongue when people piss her off so nobody will think she’s the “angry black girl.” Williamson Starr is approachable. No stank-eyes, side-eyes, none of that. Williamson Starr is nonconfrontational. Basically, Williamson Starr doesn’t give anyone a reason to call her ghetto." Her other life is centered around her home where her father runs a local grocery store and her mother is a nurse. When the protesting begins because of the unjust shooting, Starr begins to realize that her voice can be her weapon. Important story of an all too frequent event in our current times. Highly recommend.

Lines:
The ironic thing is though, at Williamson I don’t have to “play it cool”—I’m cool by default because I’m one of the only black kids there. I have to earn coolness in Garden Heights, and that’s more difficult than buying retro Jordans on release day. Funny how it works with white kids though. It’s dope to be black until it’s hard to be black.

“Listen! The Hate U—the letter U—Give Little Infants Fucks Everybody. T-H-U-G L-I-F-E. Meaning what society give us as youth, it bites them in the ass when we wild out. Get it?”

Seven shakes his head. It’s no secret that my big brother is the result of a “for hire” session Daddy had with Iesha after a fight with Momma.

Rose Park occupies a whole block, and a tall chain-link fence surrounds it. I’m not sure what it’s protecting—the graffiti on the basketball court, the rusting playground equipment, the benches that way too many babies have been made on, or the liquor bottles, cigarette butts, and trash that litter the grass.

Daddy once told me there’s a rage passed down to every black man from his ancestors, born the moment they couldn’t stop the slave masters from hurting their families. Daddy also said there’s nothing more dangerous than when that rage is activated.

A pair of gray high-tops dangle by their laces from the utility line in front of the house, telling everybody who can decipher the code that drugs are sold here. ( )
  novelcommentary | Sep 17, 2019 |
I arrived late to the party—The Hate U Give was published a couple of years ago, made a tremendous splash, and has been hailed as one of the greatest YA novels of the past twenty years. It’s garnered praise from such YA icons as John Greene, Jason Reynolds, and Becky Albertalli, and it’s won a truckload of awards. In case you’ve been asleep since 2017, here’s the plot—high school student Starr Carter witnesses a policeman shoot and kill her friend Khalil in cold blood. Together with her friends and her loving, supportive family, she struggles to find her voice and denounce this brazen act of police murder. In the process, she grows into a novice activist and learns first-hand the brutal reality of racial and socioeconomic injustice.

The novel is undeniably powerful. Angie Thomas writes with an authentic voice, and the plot addresses urgent, contemporary issues; she refuses to shy away from the ugly realities that many African American teenagers and their families confront every day, from veiled, microaggressive threats to the outright, unjustifiable violence on persons of color that cops perpetrate with seeming impunity. Her depiction is not, however, biased. Starr’s uncle is a police officer, Khalil was a drug dealer, Starr is dating a white classmate and attends a mostly white suburban high school rather far from her ‘hood. But these facts are not simple in their signification. They complicate easy dichotomies. They make Starr’s life complex and messy. Ambiguity, uncertainty, and—ultimately—fear permeate the plot.

As powerful and as effective as the narrative is, and as popular and noteworthy as the novel itself has been, I’m somewhat skeptical of its staying power. It is a novel very much “of its time”—and time will tell whether the themes it addresses and the truths it tells will endure. One hopes that they won’t—that racial and socioeconomic injustice will somehow fade away as humanity seeks to evolve into its better self and that police injustice against persons of color will become a relic of historical shame, a deplorable legacy of the USA’s greatest historical shame. But that’s unlikely to happen anytime soon, so The Hate U Give will, sadly, continue to resonate. ( )
  jimrgill | Sep 15, 2019 |
5.3, 9-12
  CurrColl | Sep 13, 2019 |
This book is funny, tragic, and heartwarming all at once. An absolutely compelling read. If I could've read it all in one sitting I would have! I have a feeling this will be a mentor text for many writers because Angie Thomas does so many interesting things with her characters and dialogue.
  akbooks | Sep 12, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 230 (next | show all)
Thomas’s debut novel offers an incisive and engrossing perspective of the life of a black teenage girl as Starr’s two worlds converge over questions of police brutality, justice, and activism.
added by g33kgrrl | editThe Atlantic, Anna Diamond (Mar 28, 2017)
 
The story, with so many issues addressed, can feel overwhelming at times, but then again, so can the life of an African American teen. Debut author Thomas is adept at capturing the voices of multiple characters, and she ultimately succeeds in restoring Starr’s true voice.
 
That hope seems slim indeed these days, but ultimately the book emphasizes the need to speak up about injustice, to have injustice be known even if not punished. That’s a message that will resonate with all young people concerned with fairness, and Starr’s experience will speak to readers who know Starr’s life like their own and provide perspective for others.
 
Beautifully written in Starr’s authentic first-person voice, this is a marvel of verisimilitude as it insightfully examines two worlds in collision. An inarguably important book that demands the widest possible readership.
 
With smooth but powerful prose delivered in Starr’s natural, emphatic voice, finely nuanced characters, and intricate and realistic relationship dynamics, this novel will have readers rooting for Starr and opening their hearts to her friends and family.

This story is necessary. This story is important.
 

» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Angie Thomasprimary authorall editionscalculated
Turpin, BahniNarratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Benedek Leila,Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartwright, DebraCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mutsaers, JasperTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stempel, JennaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Verjovsky Paul, SoniaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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I shouldn't have come to this party.
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Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr. But what Starr does-or does not-say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.
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