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A Treatise of Human Nature (1739)

by David Hume

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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2,797154,880 (3.94)10
Philosophy. Nonfiction. HTML:

A Treatise of Human Nature, first published between 1739 and 1740, is a philosophical text by the Scottish philosopher David Hume. The work contains three books: "Of the Understanding", "Of the Passions" and "Of Morals". Written by Hume when he was 26, it is considered by many to be Hume's best work and one of the most important books in philosophy's history.

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English (10)  Spanish (3)  Catalan (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (15)
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Book 1 is genius ( )
  schumacherrr | Feb 21, 2022 |
12/6/21
  laplantelibrary | Dec 6, 2021 |
Tried twice, never got far. Maybe a sensation when first published, but now of only historical interest - for those who have lots of time, which I don't, and who have never come across Oriental philosophies, which I have.. Moreover, language changes, so it's often hard to tell what the author actually meant when using words like 'extension'; and where the words are clear, the argument is sometimes spurious. This time I stopped after reading "We can form no idea of a mountain without a valley". I very well can. ( )
  Stravaiger64 | Feb 5, 2021 |
Pročitao cirke pola knjige za faks.
  NenadN | Sep 6, 2019 |
This book changed my life! At least, when I read it as an undergraduate, it reshaped my worldview. Hume develops a highly approachable idea of philosophical skepticism in the first part of this book. Having argued for this skepticism, however, he proceeds to develop one of the most influential philosophical systems of the enlightenment. Hume shows that, even if we have no clear knowledge of the truth or falsity of most of our ideas, we still retain certain characteristic patterns of belief (cause is an example) that we are not able to escape. Hume prepares the ground for Kant. I would recommend this book for those who feel something of the force of skepticism but who feel that they have not yet seen how far it can be taken or what (surprisingly commonsensical) implications result.

Beware: I had a friend in college who was incensed by Hume's profusion, of commas, in the strangest places. The prose style of the eighteenth century can be a challenge for the uninitiated. (But you learn fast!) ( )
  EthanRogers | Jul 12, 2019 |
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» Add other authors (45 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Hume, Davidprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Blumbergs, IlmārsIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lauzis, AldisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mossner, Ernest CampbellEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nidditch, Peter HaroldEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rītups, ArnisEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Selby-Bigge, L. A.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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SECT. I. OF THE ORIGIN OF OUR IDEAS.
All the perceptions of the human mind resolve themselves into two distinct kinds, which I shall call IMPRESSIONS and IDEAS.
Nothing is more usual and more natural for those, who pretend to discover anything new to the world in philosophy and the sciences, than to insinuate the praises of their own systems, by decrying all those, which have been advanced before them. (Introduction)
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It is evident, that all the sciences have a relation, greater or less, to human nature: and that however wide any of them may seem to run from it, they still return back by one passage or another. Even Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, and Natural Religion, are in some measure dependent on the science of MAN; since they lie under the cognizance of men, and are judged of by their powers and faculties. It is impossible to tell what changes and improvements we might make in these sciences were we thoroughly acquainted with the extent and force of human understanding, and could explain the nature of the ideas we employ, and of the operations we perform in our reasonings.
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Philosophy. Nonfiction. HTML:

A Treatise of Human Nature, first published between 1739 and 1740, is a philosophical text by the Scottish philosopher David Hume. The work contains three books: "Of the Understanding", "Of the Passions" and "Of Morals". Written by Hume when he was 26, it is considered by many to be Hume's best work and one of the most important books in philosophy's history.

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