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Into the Water: A Novel by Paula Hawkins
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Into the Water: A Novel (original 2017; edition 2017)

by Paula Hawkins (Author)

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2,6231553,865 (3.36)94
"The author of the #1 New York Times bestseller and global phenomenon The Girl on the Train returns with Into the Water, her addictive new novel of psychological suspense. A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged. Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from--a place to which she vowed she'd never return. With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present. Beware a calm surface--you never know what lies beneath"--… (more)
Member:cinstatelibrary
Title:Into the Water: A Novel
Authors:Paula Hawkins (Author)
Info:Riverhead Books (2017), Edition: First Edition, 400 pages
Collections:Fiction
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Into the Water by Paula Hawkins (2017)

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English (148)  Spanish (3)  Dutch (3)  All languages (154)
Showing 1-5 of 148 (next | show all)
The story is told through the lenses of several different people, some in first-person, some in third. Chapters are named after the characters featured.

Nel Abbott drowns in a spot in the river. Nel had been writing about the many women who had died in that water. She called her story The Drowning Pool, and we also read parts of it as chapters. Jules comes to her sister's funeral and to clear things up, to figure out what happens now with her niece Lena. The primary story is told by Jules, who speaks to her dead sister, asking questions, wondering what happened.

Because it had been a long time since Jules had spoken to Nel. The two had been close sisters, Nel four years older, until an incident in their teenage years. Jules cut Nel off then, and refused to talk about it. Recently, however, Nel had tried to reach Jules, pleading with her in phone messages, but Jules did not relent. Now Nel was dead and Jules held on to her resentment of her older sister.

The police came in to investigate. It seemed a straightforward drowning but they were investigating nevertheless. And the two investigators, Erin Morgan and Sean Townsend, become part of the story, their observations and actions revealing their inner thoughts.

Because of the history of the "drowning pool", the townspeople had constructed myths over the years, dating back to the days of witch hunts. There was said to be some sort of power in the water, something that drew certain women in. Of course this mythology complicated any investigation.

As we get more into the story it unfolds and connections are made, seeking other connections, until some sort of pattern finally emerges.

Reasonably well constructed, the novel did keep me interested, even as I tried to remember which character was which and where we were in the story. I question the police investigation, especially one so in-depth that Erin moves into a vacant house for a while. I didn't especially like any of the characters, but softened toward most of them as time went on. ( )
  slojudy | Sep 8, 2020 |
This is a tough one. Like so many have mentioned the opening chapters are disruptive to the story flow causing confusion and frustration but seemingly adding a necessary element to the writers creativity - in some ways reminding me of my frustrations with some of EL Doctorow's 'experimental' writings. It appears Paula Hawkins is using the initial chapters/character introductions to emphasize the lack of continuity and confusion created by the secrets surrounding a recent suicide, maybe murder, and its possible relationships to past deaths at the so-called Drowning Pool on the river running through the small English town. The characters introduced do have some interrelationship simply because this is a small community and is seems many have lost a loved one at the Drowning Pool.

As the story line evolves we do get to know and starting to piece together the various stories. Sometimes it feels like we are participating in a police investigation other times we are involved with the turmoil of emotions and questions inherent with the survivors. We see grief, anger, hate, confusion, blaming and self-doubt; all of the traumas and underlying repercussions that follow the loss of a loved one. Throughout the story there is nothing definitive only suspicions which are glimpsed as we wander through conversations or thoughts of the individuals. Slowly we are learning what is being hidden and possibly why. The frustrating sworn secrets of teenage girls, the hidden lives of others, the denial of reality by children and supposed and real failure of parents. Each holds part of the answer yet none knows all the stories.

In some ways I found this an interesting book. The writing was very good, the characters were interesting and, while very focused, were nicely developed. Overall it was an intriguing story which was hindered by the somewhat confusing and fractured development of the story line. This sounds like a contradiction but the unique structure chosen by Paula Hawkins created an uncomfortable feeling yet I believe suited her purpose. Would have given this 4 stars as it had all the proper elements of an above average story with the exception of the frustration created by opening chapters disruptive nature which continued throughout the story and created an uncomfortable pace. Yes eventually you more of less get use to it but there is too much need to reference back to prior chapters to be sure you understand the total context of events.

Would like to see how this style of story presentation can be developed. However, when you have a number of characters initially you do not know, understand, with not idea of their relevancy it is like jumping into middle of a conversation on complicated topic with no idea what it is about. Sooner or later it starts to make sense but still you feel you missed something important.

( )
  can44okie | Aug 28, 2020 |
I've become a sucker for this style of mystery and enjoyed Paula Hawkins' Girl on the Train quite a bit. This book delivers as well. It is written from the perspective of several characters, alternating throughout the novel. This approach kept me guessing in a good way. Our perception of reality is not always the reality, of course. This is clear as the story unfolds. Digging into the perceptions and needs of each character mined the complexities of life. I'm now officially a Hawkins fan waiting for the next book. ( )
  jjpseattle | Aug 2, 2020 |
Each character had a secret. Most were unlikeable. Still, the book was an engrossing read. I was surprised by the ending. There were a few loose ends but that makes a book more enjoyable for me... considering different possibilities. I listened to the audio book which I enjoyed because it was performed with a British accent. ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Aug 1, 2020 |
2.5/3 This was a very hard book to follow especially with all of the characters and different POV's. It was also a very slow burn. ( )
  autumnrain87 | Jul 31, 2020 |
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Epigraph
I was very young when I was cracked open.

Some things you should let go of

Others you shouldn't

Views differ as to which

-Emily Berry, "The Numbers Game"
We now know that memories are not fixed or frozen, like Proust's jars of preserves in a larder, but are transformed, disassembled, reassembled, and recategorized with every act of recollection.
-Oliver Sacks, Hallucinations
Dedication
For all the troublemakers
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"Again! Again!" The men bind her again.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"The author of the #1 New York Times bestseller and global phenomenon The Girl on the Train returns with Into the Water, her addictive new novel of psychological suspense. A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged. Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother's sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from--a place to which she vowed she'd never return. With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present. Beware a calm surface--you never know what lies beneath"--

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