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The stone sky by N. K. Jemisin
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The stone sky (edition 2017)

by N. K. Jemisin

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1,1936810,462 (4.27)125
""Intricate and extraordinary." - New York Times on The Fifth Season THIS IS THE WAY THE WORLD ENDS... FOR THE LAST TIME. The Moon will soon return. Whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women. Essun has inherited the power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every orogene child can grow up safe. For Nassun, her mother's mastery of the Obelisk Gate comes too late. She has seen the evil of the world, and accepted what her mother will not admit: that sometimes what is corrupt cannot be cleansed, only destroyed. The remarkable conclusion to the post-apocalyptic and highly acclaimed trilogy that began with the multi-award-nominated The Fifth Season. The Broken EarthThe Fifth SeasonThe Obelisk GateThe Stone Sky For more from N. K. Jemisin, check out: The Inheritance TrilogyThe Hundred Thousand KingdomsThe Broken KingdomsThe Kingdom of Gods The Inheritance Trilogy (omnibus edition)Shades in Shadow: An Inheritance Triptych (e-only short fiction)The Awakened Kingdom (e-only novella) Dreamblood DuologyThe Killing MoonThe Shadowed Sun The Dreamblood Duology (omnibus)"--"THIS IS THE WAY THE WORLD ENDS... FOR THE LAST TIME. The Moon will soon return. Whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women. Essun has inherited the power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every orogene child can grow up safe. For Nassun, her mother's mastery of the Obelisk Gate comes too late. She has seen the evil of the world, and accepted what her mother will not admit: that sometimes what is corrupt cannot be cleansed, only destroyed. The remarkable conclusion to the post-apocalyptic and highly acclaimed trilogy that began with the multi-award-nominated The Fifth Season"--… (more)
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Title:The stone sky
Authors:N. K. Jemisin
Info:New York Orbit August 2017
Collections:Your library
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Tags:fantasy

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The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin

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» See also 125 mentions

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I'm just not a fan of this trilogy. I hated the present tense and the obtuse writing. Some of the reveals I figured out long before it was revealed in the books, some took so long to be revealed that it was an anticlimax even if I didn't see it coming.

I loved the characters and world building, but I think the story could have been tightened up and told in just one book. I was really disappointed in this series, I really wanted to love it. ( )
  jezebellydancer | Aug 3, 2019 |
This is a deceptively non-fat book, compared both to the general epic fantasy market but also its two preceding volumes. Partly that's because it rests on the immense and satisfying work done on world and scenario setting in those first two books (but not entirely, because this breaks and explores fascinating and new ground of distant history and world exploration) and partly because the epic nature of the final conflict lies in its simplicity and unavoiability: Essun and Nassun are enormous and determined forces, and their natures and needs will not permit of complications. That is part of the strength of the face-off. They are the devil and the deep blue sea, the rock and the hard place, but they are also victims, survivors, rising tall over everything that has been thrown at them. Until the very end I wasn't sure which would win--which I wanted to win--and it was a stupendous journey throughout.

I was chatting with some spec-fic readers the other day about this series, and how it is not light-escapist-romp fantasy. Someone termed it grimdark, but I strongly feel that doesn't apply here. For all the heartbreaking oppression, the violence, the abuse... it is, in the end, a story about surviving that, and about how anger can help you survive, but it cannot help you live, and it cannot help you build something better. That is about love, in all its manifestations (there are so many beautiful friendships in this series) and about hope. So is this series. It just isn't sugar-coated or fairytale about it. And that message of love and hope is all the more beautiful for it. ( )
  cupiscent | Aug 3, 2019 |
Impressive fantasy fiction, made memorable by the insightfulness of the human interactions, and the fictional echo of the real bigotry and racism in our world, played out in a totally different environment.
The third volume recaptures the verve of the first - very enjoyable.
This volume successfully brings all the strands of the 1200+ pages to a satisfactory ending. ( )
  mbmackay | Jul 11, 2019 |
This final book in Jemisin’s trilogy tries to bring together all the threads of narrative and story concepts that have been wielded in the earlier books: family, the unchecked development of technological power, the hubris that comes from that power, building robots through genetic engineering, the existence of Gaia, and more.

We are in Earth’s far future, millions of years from now, and tens of thousands of years after a cataclysmic event that has almost destroyed the planet. Humans share the planet with, and are both fearful of and reliant on, two genetically modified peoples; enigmatic stone eaters, whose purpose we gradually discover over the course of the story, and orogenes who are able to detect and to some level control the increasingly frequent geological disasters affecting the world (volcanoes, earthquakes and other events).

We follow a mother and daughter as they lose their families and each other, find other families to cling to, fight each other over the fate of the world and ultimately make great sacrifices to achieve a resolution to the ages old cycles of destruction across the planet.

That Jemisin has achieved great leaps of imagination cannot be argued. She deftly aligns the technological and societal fears of today into a left-liberal dystopian picture of the far future and we see clear parallels between the woke agenda of the early 21st century and the failings of our descendants.

Would that we sometimes come to praise Caesar and not bury him. ( )
  pierthinker | Jul 3, 2019 |
Remember the way you feel when you read this book. Remember the way you will feel when you finish it. I find it hard to believe you will ever be able to replicate these feelings anywhere else. That's how special this story is.

I am so sad to let it go.

What a perfect ending.

What a perfect story.

( )
  ainjel | Jun 20, 2019 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
N. K. Jemisinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Chan, WendyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miles, RobinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Panepinto, LaurenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paul, TimMap artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To those who've survived: Breathe. That's it. Once more. Good. You're good. Even if you're not, you're alive. That is a victory.
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Time grows short, my love.
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