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The stone sky by N. K. Jemisin
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The stone sky (edition 2017)

by N. K. Jemisin

Series: The Broken Earth (3)

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2,2921225,131 (4.29)175
The Moon will soon return. Whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women. Essun has inherited the power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every orogene child can grow up safe. For Nassun, her mother's mastery of the Obelisk Gate comes too late. She has seen the evil of the world, and accepted what her mother will not admit: that sometimes what is corrupt cannot be cleansed, only destroyed.… (more)
Member:evareads
Title:The stone sky
Authors:N. K. Jemisin
Info:New York Orbit August 2017
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:fantasy

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The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin

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Showing 1-5 of 120 (next | show all)
Final chapter in the Broken Earth Trilogy. The story is wonderful, but I was again frustrated by how difficult it is to understand what's happening sometimes. I read the start of Inheritance (an extra at the end of the book- but I've already read it) and I was reminded that Jemisin isn't always so opaque- that was easier to follow.
Anyway, Stone Sky finally fills in Hoa's back story and explains how the Stoneaters came to be- it tells the story of how the advanced society attempted to harness magic, never suspecting that the Earth was sentient and fighting back until the catastrophe that created the current conditions.
And primarily the book continues to follow the actions of Essun and Nassun, mother and daughter who are the only two people left on the planet capable of controlling the obelisks now that Alabaster is dead. The moon, released from orbit when the troubles started eons ago, is passing nearby in its independent orbit, and now is the time to recapture it- this is the task that Alabaster gave to Essun, and the reason he created the terrible rift at the start of the trilogy, so that it's energy will be available for its recapture. Essun is traveling with the people of Castrima, trying to make it to the equatorial city that is now deserted after she killed everyone in it defending Castrima by using the obelisks. (The body count in this trilogy is probably record-breaking).
Meanwhile, Nassun eventually confronts her father with cathartic results, and then leaves with Schaffa for Corepoint, on the other side of the world, where more secrets are revealed. Schaffa has been compromised by the Earth, but has been fighting its effects- I found his motives difficult to parse, even now that I've finished the book- he's fighting against the Earth to retain his free will, but nevertheless aids Nassun in doing the bidding of the Earth anyway? The Stoneaters are split into factions too, some allied with Hoa and others opposing him.

I was ready for a lower rating, due to my frustration over not quite understanding some of the action, but the final reunion of Essun and Nassun pays off beautifully and made me cry. An afterward by the author explains that her own mother was dying while she was writing, and Motherhood becomes a theme of the trilogy. ( )
  DanTarlin | Sep 10, 2021 |
“How can we prepare for the future if we won’t acknowledge the past?”

An amazing series comes to an end. It has been fantastic, reading this series; I don’t think I can really write much about it because I can’t do it justice. This book is a perfect conclusion to this series; it answers all the questions that have been going through my mind since I started reading The Fifth Season – how was the world originally like, who sent the Moon away, how did the Shattering occur, what is the origin of orogeny, who are the stone eaters and whose side are they on.

“But for a society built on exploitation, there is no greater threat than having no one left to oppress. Someone must suffer, if the rest are to enjoy luxury.”

This book as well as the series explore so many other themes through the story. A mother will do anything to protect her child, irrespective of how strong or wrong the child is. Oppression can’t go on forever, it will turn into a dangerous bloody cycle. We can’t exploit nature endlessly with no consequences. Ultimately, all everyone wants is a little bit of love – between family, friends or even strangers. Just show a little bit of love and little less of fear towards the person next to you and the world will have less strife.

“There have always been those who use despair and desperation as weapons.”

I think everyone should read this series. It’s extremely well written prose, engaging story, very strongly developed characters, and a world that is very different and similar to ours at the same time. Books that provoke you, make you think and introspect, being enjoyable at the same time, are very hard to come by, especially in Fiction. Don’t let go of this one.

“If you love someone, you don’t get to choose how they love you back.” ( )
  ksahitya1987 | Aug 20, 2021 |
This entire series was outstanding, and the third book a fitting finale. I'm sorry there can't be any more after this. ( )
  Enno23 | Aug 15, 2021 |
Wow.

“I think,” Hoa says slowly, “that if you love someone, you don’t get to choose how they love you back.”

That is quite the conclusion. Everything that made [b:The Fifth Season|19161852|The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth, #1)|N.K. Jemisin|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1386803701l/19161852._SY75_.jpg|26115977] and [b:The Obelisk Gate|26228034|The Obelisk Gate (The Broken Earth, #2)|N.K. Jemisin|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1578523237l/26228034._SY75_.jpg|46213537] wonderful--the terrible, raw, apocalyptic nature of the world; the broken people who still hope, who still do what must be done; the complicated depths of magic and life and Earth. It's all here and and it's somehow... more.

How can we prepare for the future if we won’t acknowledge the past?

As with the previous two books, we get a new point of view that broadens and deepens our understanding of the world, answering questions I didn't even think to ask and letting us all know that perhaps good and evil, the right and wrong choices are perhaps just a bit more complicated than that. Yet all along, people are going to do what needs to be done to survive. To thrive.

You know the end to this. Don't you? How could you be here listening to this tale if you didn't? But sometimes it is the how of a thing, not just the endgame, that matters most.

Let me just say, without reservation, that this is among the best (if not the very best) finale for a series I've ever read.

Well, well well worth the read.
( )
  jpv0 | Jul 21, 2021 |
I am in a small segment who did not like N.K. Jemisin's conclusion to her Broken Earth trilogy. Firstly, I was utterly confused for the first third of the book. I think a brief summary of what's happened in the previous books is needed for this series. Second, the jumping around between characters and time periods was not executed seamlessly, as another reviewer commented. Just the opposite. Finally, the ending seemed anti-climatic to me, like the rest of the air escaping a grounded helium balloon. On the other hand, her descriptive writing is really quite good, and I liked the creativity of the purpose for the plutonic engine. ( )
1 vote skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
N. K. Jemisinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Chan, WendyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meeks, MirandaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miles, RobinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Panepinto, LaurenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paul, TimMap artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Nebula ( [2017]Novel2017)
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To those who've survived: Breathe. That's it. Once more. Good. You're good. Even if you're not, you're alive. That is a victory.
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Time grows short, my love.
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The Moon will soon return. Whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women. Essun has inherited the power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every orogene child can grow up safe. For Nassun, her mother's mastery of the Obelisk Gate comes too late. She has seen the evil of the world, and accepted what her mother will not admit: that sometimes what is corrupt cannot be cleansed, only destroyed.

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Average: (4.29)
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1 6
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2 16
2.5 4
3 60
3.5 41
4 266
4.5 48
5 335

 

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