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The stone sky by N. K. Jemisin
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The stone sky (edition 2017)

by N. K. Jemisin

Series: The Broken Earth (3)

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1,782936,737 (4.28)156
The Moon will soon return. Whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women. Essun has inherited the power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every orogene child can grow up safe. For Nassun, her mother's mastery of the Obelisk Gate comes too late. She has seen the evil of the world, and accepted what her mother will not admit: that sometimes what is corrupt cannot be cleansed, only destroyed.… (more)
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Title:The stone sky
Authors:N. K. Jemisin
Info:New York Orbit August 2017
Collections:Your library
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Tags:fantasy

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The Stone Sky by N. K. Jemisin

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» See also 156 mentions

English (92)  Dutch (1)  All languages (93)
Showing 1-5 of 92 (next | show all)
At the end of the day I found this to be a good ending of an important series but I still find myself most impressed with the first book in the trilogy. That book had more of a human scale than its successors, rather than its characters being caught in a never-ending story of lousy outcomes. With this volume one gets the deep explanation of why the world Essun & Nassun live in is as it is and I'm still processing how impressed I should be at these revelations. This is keeping in mind that I AM impressed with a narrative that examines Humanity's talent for operationalized oppression and takes it to the hilt; be happy you don't get what you deserve. ( )
  Shrike58 | Sep 26, 2020 |
Last but not least, the story of Essun and Nassun comes to an end. Everything I said before still holds. These stories make for great reading at a surface level but are also powerful metaphors in the end. I am anxious to read more by Jemisin to see if and how she applies that same duality to more of her writing. And the pacing of this book is (almost) just as good as its predecessors (see below). Every chapter moves the story along precisely as much as Nemisin wants it to, and each chapter gives we the readers just enough to keep us wanting more (for the most part). All that said, I have two complaints (and I'll try to make them spoiler free):

1. The introduction of Hoa's story feels tacked on. I gave Jemisin a break when I wrote about the second book, The Obelisk Gate, and complained that she added a new major and important character that was completely left out of the first book by saying that I confessed she didn't have much of a choice. But here is Hoa, a major player in all three books, and we finally get his backstory in the final book? Prior to that, we knew nothing about him and very little about his race of Stone Eaters. Suddenly we get a substantial portion of this novel describing their entire backstory and evolution. Frankly I would have liked that spread out across all three novels a little better. This was the first time that I got a little annoyed at Jemisin's pacing. The Hoa chapters didn't interest me. I was 100% onboard with the Essun/Nassun stories. Hoa's felt like speed bumps. I mean, I get it, and I see why that was important. But I would have liked that spread out more across all three books in a way that made each piece relevant to the other parts of the story that were being told at the time.

2. When you have characters who both have access to a power that can immediately (nearly) transport them anywhere on the planet, choosing to travel there the long way feels forced. I think Jemisin had Nassun travel the long way because Essun wasn't ready to go herself, not yet, and she (Nemisin) needed something for Nassun to do in the meantime. So she made her travel by foot and find this tunnel, etc. Just didn't feel organic to me. And look what it did to Schaffa! All of Jemisin's meticulous plotting for the first two novels kind of breaks down with this one plot contrivance here.

So two points against this book? Well, let me put one back and give extra credit for the awesome ending. She seeded the eventual resolve in Essun's condition nicely in the second book. And while it's not the saccharin-sweet ending that some people might have been hoping for, it leaves all (most) of the characters in a good place. If she ever decides to write a fourth book, I will be anxious to read it.

Nicely done. ( )
  invisiblelizard | Aug 15, 2020 |
This is the way the world ends. For the last time.

I love this series so much. The characters are vivid; the world is dark, yet hopeful, the themes are thought-provoking and the writing style is challenging and engaging. I don't want to spoil the ending except to say the Jemisin STUCK THE LANDING! It makes sense and I feel enriched for having read it. ( )
  Rachel_Hultz | Aug 15, 2020 |
Before I started this one, I re-read the first two back to back so I would have everything properly in my brain to finish the series. While re-reading the second book, and reading some of the reviews of it, I started to revise my own thoughts about it a bit. I agree more with many of the reviews that the second was not as good as the first and shared some very slight worries about the third. After having finished the whole series now, I can say it's slightly flawed but mostly I love it. I knew I was going to love it to the end when I read the first book, and based on that I was not at all disappointed. I cried when it ended, partially because of some death I was sad about and partially because the series is over now. N.K. Jemisin has been my favourite new thing of fantasy and sci fi from the last few years and I've never stopped singing her praises and recommending this series to people. It has racial and gender resonance that I can't help but think will continue for far too long. I loved being immersed in the world and the characters, the history and geology and meteorology and lore and science. I hope to find something new soon that will give me the same feelings as this series did! ( )
  katebrarian | Jul 28, 2020 |
5 stars - The conclusion to The Broken Earth Trilogy. Jemisin has built a world both believable, but unlike anything before it. The trilogy perfectly mixes sci-fi and fantasy, gives a hard view of family life in an apocalyptic time, adresses the harshness of hate and bigotry based on key abilities possesed by some people which actually aid and protect the people who hate them. The interpersonal relationships are interesting and well developed. The shifting viewpoints hold your interest and keep you guessing. This book concludes one of the very best trilogies i've ever read in any genre. In fact, if you are like me, you will want to read it again after finishing it. Not because you need to, but because you think there is still so much more you can draw from the 3 books. ( )
  JohnKaess | Jul 23, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 92 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
N. K. Jemisinprimary authorall editionscalculated
Chan, WendyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meeks, MirandaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Miles, RobinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Panepinto, LaurenCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paul, TimMap artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To those who've survived: Breathe. That's it. Once more. Good. You're good. Even if you're not, you're alive. That is a victory.
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Time grows short, my love.
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The Moon will soon return. Whether this heralds the destruction of humankind or something worse will depend on two women. Essun has inherited the power of Alabaster Tenring. With it, she hopes to find her daughter Nassun and forge a world in which every orogene child can grow up safe. For Nassun, her mother's mastery of the Obelisk Gate comes too late. She has seen the evil of the world, and accepted what her mother will not admit: that sometimes what is corrupt cannot be cleansed, only destroyed.

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Average: (4.28)
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