HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Train I Ride by Paul Mosier
Loading...

Train I Ride (original 2017; edition 2017)

by Paul Mosier (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1049266,967 (4.11)None
Rydr is on a train heading east, leaving California, where her gramma can't take care of her anymore, and traveling to Chicago to live with an unknown relative. She brings with her a suitcase, memories both happy and sad, and a box containing something very important. As Rydr meets her fellow passengers and learns their stories, her own past begins to emerge. And as much as Rydr may want to forget about her life in California, on the train she finds that maybe her past can help her deal with her present. And maybe hope and forgiveness are all around her and, most important, within her, if she's willing to look for it.… (more)
Member:mandyyates
Title:Train I Ride
Authors:Paul Mosier (Author)
Info:HarperCollins (2017), 192 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work Information

Train I Ride by Paul Mosier (2017)

  1. 00
    13 Little Blue Envelopes by Maureen Johnson (EMS_24)
    EMS_24: I journey by an inexperienced girl, to a destiny she don't know, meeting people on the way.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
When a book makes me cry and think and consider reading beat poetry (which I hate), I have to give it five stars.

This book is not flawless, but it's beautiful. The writing, the characters, the journey. All beautiful. I hate to hear people say this book is too sad, because I think it's actually a very optimistic book. Rydr is so strong in the face of all she's gone through with her mother's addiction and death, not to mention being cared for by a stern grandmother who then also passes away.

This book is about resilience.

I have high hopes for it come Newbery time. ( )
  LibrarianDest | Jan 3, 2024 |
Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.
  fernandie | Sep 15, 2022 |
Anyone with a heart, read this!
A Paul Theroux by a twelve year old girl and a precious coming of age. Lively written. Easily in a good way, every word is meaningful. A smile is never far away. You travel and discover. The train as a set and as a metaphor: changing landscape, a place in between, a safe territory to connect, process and growth. Friendship and more; and the lack of it. You will cry, even if it is only in your heart. It is touching, not sentimental. Closer, Clever, Star

Iedereen met een hart, lees dit!
Een Paul Theroux door een twaalfjarig meisje en een kostbare coming of age. Levendig geschreven. Gemakkelijk op een goede manier, elk zin is betekenisvol. Ook met glimlach. Je reist en ontdekt mee. De trein als decor en als metafoor: veranderend landschap, een plek tussenin, een veilig territorium om te verbinden, te verwerken en te groeien. Vriendschap en meer; en het gebrek daaraan. Je gaat huilen, al is het alleen in je hart. Het is ontroerend, niet sentimenteel. Dichter, Slim, Sterk. ( )
  EMS_24 | Nov 11, 2020 |
This is a beautifully written book and a brilliantly told story. It’s an extraordinary book and I’m putting it on my favorites shelf.

This is a children’s book about an almost 13 year old girl, narrated by her.I was completely invested in her character and her story and also in the stories/lives of some of the other characters in the book. As an eleven or twelve year old this book would have been lifesaving for me and I’d have loved it at ages nine and ten too.

This would have been a one day/one reading session book except that I started reading very late the evening before the day I finished it.

I cried at the end and felt like crying many times throughout the book. It’s a fantastic book for children ages 9-13. Adult alert: sensitive children and young children (under age 11) and the children who could most benefit (with experiences at all similar to the narrator) from reading this story or having it read to them, their adults might want to consider if its power would be helpful or detrimental. I would personally err on the side of recommending this book to most children. It would make a wonderful read aloud, both one to one and with groups.

We eventually learn the girl’s real last name but not her first name and that was fine, even though I wanted to know. I liked how the future is left open ended. I believe that this story is nearly perfectly told. At least I cannot think of anything different that would have improved the book. It is a terribly sad story but one that’s also funny and charming and hopeful and endearing. I love the brief on the train relationships and how meaningful and powerful they are and how they significantly impact everyone involved.

A top notch children’s book that most adults should be able to thoroughly enjoy.

I have positive feelings for trains. I was predisposed to enjoy this book. I loved riding trains when I was young. I rode the California Zephyr several times from Northern California to Chicago and back, a different route than the Southern California to Chicago this girl rides. I also rode other routes. This book inspired me to finally add a “trains” shelf and I don’t know why I hadn’t created a “trains” shelf before now. One of my first ever favorite books was The Little Engine That Could and I’m sure I’ll find plenty of books that belong on my new “trains” shelf.

“The best kind of people are people who feel, and who hold hope in their hearts. Even if it sometimes means being hurt and disappointed. Even if it always means being hurt and disappointed.”

“Lots of things that are worth seeing aren't happy things.” ( )
  Lisa2013 | Feb 8, 2020 |
Rydr is taking the train from California to Chicago, where she will be living with a distant relative that she has never met. This book is the story of that train ride, what happens, and how some of the other passengers and workers become her new support system. Much of her time is spent trying to find ways to get food, as she used up all her food money before even leaving on the trip. ( )
  geraldinefm | Dec 11, 2017 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
for Keri, Eleri and Harmony, I feel home where you are.
First words
The train wherein
i am has sixteen compartments.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Rydr is on a train heading east, leaving California, where her gramma can't take care of her anymore, and traveling to Chicago to live with an unknown relative. She brings with her a suitcase, memories both happy and sad, and a box containing something very important. As Rydr meets her fellow passengers and learns their stories, her own past begins to emerge. And as much as Rydr may want to forget about her life in California, on the train she finds that maybe her past can help her deal with her present. And maybe hope and forgiveness are all around her and, most important, within her, if she's willing to look for it.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.11)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 3
3.5
4 9
4.5 3
5 6

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 208,961,443 books! | Top bar: Always visible