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Julius Caesar: Man, Soldier, and Tyrant by…
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Julius Caesar: Man, Soldier, and Tyrant

by J. F. C. Fuller

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Good review of Caesar. But a lot is just copied from Caesar, not much in the way of insight. ( )
  jerry-book | Jan 26, 2016 |
999 Julius Caesar: Man, Soldier, and Tyrant, by Major-General J. F. C. Fuller (read 23 Feb 1969) After I read this book and Natthias Gelzer's book on Caesar I said: It is amazing to me how little I actually knew of such a famed man as Caesar. His career was known to me in no sort of order. Now it is clear: consul, pacifier of Gaul, invader of Britain, suppresser of the Gallic Revolt led by Vercingetorix, crossing the Rubicon, his victories in Spain, his defeat of Pompey in Pharsalis in Greece, his following Pompey to Egypt, his Cleopatra phase, his 'veni, vidi, vici' in Asia Minor, his conclusion of the Civil War by victory in Africa over Cato, his victories again in Spain, his short time as dictator in Rome, his assassination on March 15, 44 B.C. An amazing life! ( )
1 vote Schmerguls | Jul 12, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0306804220, Paperback)

Since the Renaissance, Julius Caesar has been idolized as a superman. Classical sources, however, present a far less exalted being. As General Fuller writes, Caesar was "an unscrupulous demagogue whose one aim was power, and a general who could not only win brilliant victories but also commit dismal blunders.... It is reasonable to suspect that, at times, Caesar was not responsible for his actions, and toward the end of his life, not altogether sane." There is not doubt that Caesar was an extraordinary man.” But Fuller points out that he was extraordinary for his reckless ambition, matchless daring, and ruthless tyranny, rather than for his skills as a military comander. Caesar continually had to extricate himself from results of mistakes of judgement. His unnecessary Alexandrian War, his close call at Thapsus, and his seemingly unpremeditated Gallic conquest are just a few of Fuller's many examples.And in telling Caesar's history, Fuller illuminates a century of Roman history as well. Aided by maps of Caesar's principal battles and diagrams of many of his weapons, Fuller brings to life Caesar's wars, his armies, his equipment, and his methods. Brilliant in design and impressive in scope, Julius Caesar clarifies how the military, political, and economic aspects of the Roman Republic worked together to produce a man whose name has come down to us as a synonym for absolute authority.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:14 -0400)

Since the Renaissance, Julius Caesar has been idolized as a superman. While there is no doubt that Caesar was extraordinary, Fuller points out that this was more for his reckless ambition, matchless daring, and ruthless tyranny than for his skills as a military commander. Caesar continually had to extricate himself from the results of mistaken judgment; his unpremeditated Gallic conquest was just one of many examples. In telling Caesar's history, Fuller illuminates a century of Roman history as well, bringing to life Caesar's wars, his armies, his equipment, and his methods. Brilliant in design and impressive in scope, Julius Caesar clarifies how the military, political, and economic aspects of the Roman Republic worked together to produce a man whose name has come down to us as a synonym for absolute authority.… (more)

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