HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Acid Dreams: The Complete Social History of…
Loading...

Acid Dreams: The Complete Social History of LSD: The CIA, the Sixties, and… (edition 1994)

by Martin A. Lee (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
483438,637 (4.05)2
Acid Dreams is the complete social history of LSD and the counterculture it helped to define in the sixties. Martin Lee and Bruce Shlain's exhaustively researched and astonishing account -- part of it gleaned from secret government files -- tells how the CIA became obsessed with LSD as an espionage weapon during the early 1950s and launched a massive covert research program, in which countless unwitting citizens were used as guinea pigs. Though the CIA was intent on keeping the drug to itself, it ultimately couldn't prevent it from spreading into the popular culture; here LSD had a profound impact and helped spawn a political and social upheaval that changed the face of America. From the clandestine operations of the government to the escapades of Timothy Leary, Abbie Hoffman, Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters, Allen Ginsberg, and many others, Acid Dreams provides an important and entertaining account that goes to the heart of a turbulent period in our history. Book jacket.… (more)
Member:mifoley119
Title:Acid Dreams: The Complete Social History of LSD: The CIA, the Sixties, and Beyond
Authors:Martin A. Lee (Author)
Info:Grove Press (1994), Edition: Revised, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Acid Dreams: The Complete Social History of LSD: The CIA, the Sixties, and Beyond by Martin A. Lee

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 2 mentions

Showing 4 of 4
What a journey! That’s my feeling after having read this book. Published in 1984, here and there some aspects of it accuse its age and time of publication, taking for granted assumptions that were only possible in the eighties. But this is not to be taken as a flaw, for no one can truly think outside of its own time, and the authors (the whole bunch) are no exception. It’s just a quirk of the book, something that now happens to be there (when it was published it was probably not much of an issue).

As for the story itself, what a crazy trip that was! In a way it’s like LSD’s history is in itself as psychedelic as the substance itself. From Albert Hofmann’s bicycle ride home till the 60’s out of this world social upheavels, LSD seemed as if always bound to take its users to unknown and untold extremes, defying any atempt to a rational characterization of the whole ride.

In this sense, this book is an awesome journey onto that now much unknown succession of events that had so much influence on the world that we are still living today. Plus, by being written at a not too distant timeframe from those happenings, it still carries very tangible echoes of those times and expectations, and by this being much more alive than if it was researched and published today. It’s still dealing with [some] living characters, they’re still household names (Hofmann, Leary, Ginsberg, as many others), and their stories and influences are still very much alive in everyone’s imagination. It’s still beating with the beats of those now much more distant and, in a sense, more critically understood and much less revered times.

For all that, for being like a time capsule that takes you back to the heydays of some very weird and hectic (in a psychedelic sense) times, and for being so entertaining (as far as a history book goes), this is definitely worth a reading. And if you happen to wonder how people could be so naive, and oftentimes so out of touch with the real world, this book also offers you, in an implicit lesson on how our times will be perceived and understood for by the generations to come. Maybe that’s LSD’s way, as a history, of still providing its outside the box unique perspective. ( )
  adsicuidade | Sep 8, 2018 |
page 50 bookmarked with white piece of paper
  AnomalyArchive | Aug 11, 2018 |
The history of LSD is full of fascinating characters and episodes, and this book covers it very well. It gives an accessible, comprehensive and well-researched overview of the culture surrounding acid from its discovery and early studies in the 1950s to the psychedelic revolution of the 1960s. It's an enlightening read, and a very fun one – Tim Leary's life, for instance, is much more interesting than I'd have thought. It's just a shame that the book is nearly thirty years old, and thus does not cover recent developments in drug culture. ( )
1 vote clpm | Aug 3, 2011 |
This book is about more than LSD. It's about society and the US Governments reaction to a changing social order. ( )
1 vote npbone | Jan 27, 2007 |
Showing 4 of 4
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Martin A. Leeprimary authorall editionscalculated
Shlain, Brucemain authorall editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
In the spring of 1942 General William "Wild Bill" Donovan, chief of the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the CIA's wartime predecessor, assembled a half-dozen prestigious American scientists and asked them to undertake a top-secret research program.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Acid Dreams is the complete social history of LSD and the counterculture it helped to define in the sixties. Martin Lee and Bruce Shlain's exhaustively researched and astonishing account -- part of it gleaned from secret government files -- tells how the CIA became obsessed with LSD as an espionage weapon during the early 1950s and launched a massive covert research program, in which countless unwitting citizens were used as guinea pigs. Though the CIA was intent on keeping the drug to itself, it ultimately couldn't prevent it from spreading into the popular culture; here LSD had a profound impact and helped spawn a political and social upheaval that changed the face of America. From the clandestine operations of the government to the escapades of Timothy Leary, Abbie Hoffman, Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters, Allen Ginsberg, and many others, Acid Dreams provides an important and entertaining account that goes to the heart of a turbulent period in our history. Book jacket.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.05)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 15
3.5 2
4 28
4.5 5
5 22

GenreThing

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 160,324,444 books! | Top bar: Always visible